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BUSINESS
By Tom Belden and Tom Belden,Knight-Ridder News Service | November 12, 1990
PHILADELPHIA -- When William D. West got bumped from a Northwest Airlines flight in 1986, he not only got mad. The Helena, Mont., lawyer set out to get even as well.Now, a federal appeals court has ruled that he had the right to turn down free tickets and sue Northwest for damages. The airline has asked the appeals court to reconsider its decision.The decision in the West case was the only victory for airline passengers in three recent court rulings. Federal appeals courts ruled in favor of airlines in two other cases, giving the carriers the right to control sale of their frequent-flier tickets and affirming the federal government's power over the states' in air-fare advertising.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
September 4, 2014
The air of seeming inevitability that had developed around the idea of a successful constitutional challenge to state bans on gay marriage was punctured Wednesday by a federal judge in Louisiana. After 21 consecutive decisions favoring marriage equality in federal district and appellate courts since the Supreme Court struck down part of the Defense of Marriage Act, federal District Judge Martin L. C. Feldman upheld the ban on same-sex marriage that Louisiana voters overwhelmingly supported in 2004.
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BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,Sun Staff Writer | February 23, 1994
The next time you're left standing at the gate watching your overbooked flight take off, here's a small bit of consolation: You can still sue.The U.S. Supreme Court denied an appeal by Northwest Airlines Inc. yesterday and left intact a ruling saying that air travelers who get "bumped" against their will may sue in state courts for compensatory damages.The Minneapolis-based airline had argued that federal regulation of the airline industry prevents the 50,000 passengers who are involuntarily bumped from flights each year from suing under state laws.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | September 2, 2014
After taking a beating from a handful of critical constituents, members of the Anne Arundel County Council voted Tuesday night not to give a pay raise to the next set of councilmen. The measure to gradually increase the annual salary for the part-time, elected position from $36,000 to $40,518 failed on a 2-5 vote. The votes in favor came from Councilmen Jamie Benoit, a Crownsville Democrat who sponsored the bill, and Dick Ladd, a Broadneck Republican. Neither will return to the council after the election, after Ladd lost his primary and Benoit hit term limits.
SPORTS
By Joe Christensen and Joe Christensen,SUN STAFF | October 5, 2002
Orioles pitchers Calvin Maduro and Kris Foster cleared waivers this week, bumping them off the 40-man roster, and the club assigned them to Triple-A Ottawa. They have 10 days to either accept the assignment or become free agents. Maduro went 2-5 with a 5.56 ERA after being named the Orioles' No. 5 starter coming out of spring training. He underwent surgery in June to remove a fractured bone spur from his right elbow and missed the rest of the season. The Orioles acquired Foster from the Los Angeles Dodgers at the 2001 trade deadline, along with starting catcher Geronimo Gil, for reliever Mike Trombley.
TRAVEL
By Susan Stellin and Susan Stellin,New York Times News Service | August 10, 2003
With summer travel in full swing and many airplanes once again crowded, passengers waiting at their gates to board may be more likely to hear an agent announce: "This flight is overbooked. If anyone is willing to take a later flight in exchange for a travel voucher, please come to the ticket counter." But before you leap out of your seat and volunteer to be "bumped" -- the industry term for shifting passengers from an oversold flight -- make sure you know what you're getting in exchange for agreeing to take a later flight.
TRAVEL
By Tom Parsons and Tom Parsons,Dallas Morning News | June 18, 2000
Within the past three years, I have been bumped off my scheduled flight more than 25 times. More than 1 million passengers were bumped (voluntarily and involuntarily) from the top 10 U.S. airlines in 1999. That's about 1 in every 488 passengers. Those odds can pay off big for travelers. Each time I volunteered to give up my seat on oversold flights, I received compensation and was protected with a guaranteed flight on the same carrier or sometimes even on a competing carrier. The compensation has varied from airline to airline, but has included first-class tickets, coach tickets and up to $700 in airline vouchers for future flights.
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,SUN STAFF | August 25, 1996
Bumped. It's a dreaded word for most airline passengers. But, for savvy travelers with a little extra time on their hands, getting bumped can be a bonanza.With record numbers of people flying on fewer planes, ticketed passengers are more likely to get bumped since airlines routinely overbook. Before they involuntarily bump passengers, airlines must seek volunteers, however.To entice passengers to trade their seat on a plane for one in the airport waiting lounge, carriers offer sometimes irresistible incentives: free tickets, frequent flier points, even cash.
TRAVEL
April 4, 1999
BargainsTime, as the saying goes, is money.And if you are an airline passenger with extra time, you could get a free flight or big money off your next flight.This is perfect for laid-back folks who don't absolutely, positively have to get somewhere by a certain hour, and don't mind waiting for a later flight.This is the art of getting bumped. More than 1 million people got free or discounted air travel in 1997 just because they volunteered to get bumped, according Bestfares.com, a discount travel magazine that has outlined the strategy.
NEWS
April 27, 1993
Incident in elevator leads to battery chargeA Gaithersburg man was charged with battery Friday after a woman complained to police that he grabbed her in the elevator at North Arundel Hospital.According to the police report, the 32-year-old woman was getting into an elevator about 1 p.m. when two men held the door open for her. The woman accidentally bumped into one of the men and apologized. The man said he didn't mind "pretty girls bumping into" him, then allegedly grabbed the woman, put his arm around her and pushed his body up against hers.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Nitkin, For The Baltimore Sun and By Karen Nitkin, For The Baltimore Sun | July 30, 2014
When Edward Bosco and Marianne Kresevich decided to open a pizza restaurant, they didn't choose his hometown of Brooklyn, N.Y. And they didn't pick Chicago, where they were living at the time. Instead, the husband and wife moved to Baltimore and opened Verde in Canton. "We felt differentiating ourselves would be easier in Baltimore," says Bosco. Their rustic-chic restaurant, which opened in 2012, is among a handful of places that are bringing higher-quality pizza to the region. Without a pizza shop on every corner, entrepreneurs in Baltimore see room to carve out their own slice of the action, offering pies that meet a growing pizza sophistication.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | July 15, 2014
Johns Hopkins, for decades ranked the best hospital in the country, has been through this before. Two years ago, it fell to No. 2 in the annual U.S. News and World Report rankings, regaining the top spot last year. But No. 3? "What a disaster!" said Dr. Ashish K. Jha, professor of health policy at Harvard School of Public Health, before quickly adding: "Just kidding. While these rankings are interesting, the bottom line is that Hopkins remains one of the very best hospitals in the world.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | March 21, 2014
As the deadline approaches to sign up for health coverage under the Affordable Care Act, Maryland's exchange saw a bump on enrollment in private plans. In the week ending March 15, 4,143 people bought private plans through the exchange website, bringing the total to 44,836. Another 9,769 signed up for Medicaid, bringing that total to 107,550. Combined with adults automatically moved to Medicaid from a state program, a total of 248,230 have obtained new coverage that began this year.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | March 17, 2014
The Rawlings-Blake administration's efforts to slash Baltimore's long-term deficit has run into a bump - more than $100 million in new police, education and other expenses now expected over the next decade. The school system is billing the city for more students than expected - at a cost of several million dollars a year. The enrollment figures are wrong, school and city officials agree, but under state law, the city still has to pay a bill that could come to $43 million. Settlements of lawsuits against the Police Department and increased landfill costs are among other expenses that were not anticipated in the fiscal plan.
NEWS
December 29, 2013
Let me start off by saying that I am not opposed to speed cameras by themselves. I am only opposed to speed cameras that do not accurately measure speed and/or do not provide sufficient information in their documentation to violators to prove that the speed limit was exceeded by the amount specified by law. Baltimore officials insist that the city's speed camera program is intended to protect the safety of schoolchildren and not to make money....
SPORTS
By Don Markus, The Baltimore Sun | October 18, 2013
COLLEGE PARK - A nearly 60-year-old basketball arena called Cole Field House was transformed into a hot, crowded, ear-deafening time capsule Friday night. It could have been 1969, the year Lefty Driesell arrived from Davidson filled with bluster and bravado and determined to make Maryland into "the UCLA of the East. " It could have been 1989, the year Gary Williams returned to his alma mater from Ohio State, vowing to rebuild a scandal-ridden, down-on-its-luck program. It could have been 2002, when the Terps won their first national championship a few weeks after closing the building with an unbeaten home season.
BUSINESS
By Tom Belden and Tom Belden,Knight-Ridder News Service | November 19, 1990
The unhappy experience of a group of harried airline travelers a few years ago has led to the creation of a useful videotape about the legal rights of business travelers.Mark Pestronk, a Washington lawyer specializing in travel-industry law, and Ivan Michael Schaeffer, a lawyer and president of a travel-agency consortium, were traveling together and saw two dozen people get bumped from a flight at an East Coast airport.The airline that had overbooked did not ask for volunteers to take a later flight in exchange for cash or a free ticket on a future flight, the standard practice most carriers use in such situations, Mr. Schaeffer recalled.
SPORTS
By KEN ROSENTHAL | January 16, 1995
SAN FRANCISCO -- Let's start with the official. Jimmy never bumped an official. Never took a 15-yard penalty to thwart a drive with his team trailing by 10 points in the fourth quarter of the NFC championship game.Barry did that yesterday.That, and a whole lot more.Barry's team committed three turnovers in the first five minutes. Barry's team trailed 21-0 before the first quarter was half over. Barry's team ran when it should have thrown, and threw when it should have run, but you know what?
BUSINESS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | October 14, 2013
Amtrak saw record ridership in fiscal year 2013, including tens of thousands of additional riders out of Baltimore's Penn Station, the company said Monday. Total national ridership reached 31.6 million, about 400,000 more than in 2012, the company said. The system has seen ridership growth in 10 out of the last 11 years, the exception being 2009. The system logged slight ridership bumps along its northeast corridor and in Maryland, with more than 2 million riders at the state's five largest stations, the company said.
SPORTS
By Matt Vensel | October 9, 2013
During the first quarter of Sunday's win over the Dolphins, safety James Ihedigbo displayed great awareness when he raced to the sideline to pick off a pass from Miami quarterback Ryan Tannehill. But after the interception, which would later be overturned by a video review, Ihedigbo had tunnel vision. As he raced to celebrate with teammates, he didn't see coach John Harbaugh coming in for a chest bump. The end result was a hilarious video being posted to YouTube entitled “ John Harbaugh Chest Bump Fail .” Harbaugh has a sense of humor, though.
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