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Bulworth

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By J.D. Considine CLASSICAL Kirov Opera conducted by Valery Gergiev | April 30, 1998
'Bulworth'The Soundtrack (Interscope 90160)They're boastful, verbose, self-aggrandizing, contentious - when you think about it, there are a lot of traits that politicians and rap stars have in common. So it shouldn't seem too strange to find a rap soundtrack behind "Bulworth," Warren Beatty's new Washington-based political comedy.Don't get the wrong idea, though. Despite a photo inside the CD booklet that shows a sweat-suited Beatty getting down with a group of gold-chain-wearing rappers, "Bulworth: The Soundtrack" doesn't waste time with fake, Hollywood-style hip-hop.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | November 19, 2004
Don Cheadle jolted audiences in the best moments of Warren Beatty's 1998 political burlesque Bulworth (screening Monday night in the Maryland Film Festival's fall series at the Maryland Institute College of Art). As drug overlord "L.D.," he told an unhinged white liberal senator (Beatty) that the gangsta life gave young blacks better moneymaking opportunities than the bankrupt public school system. In D.C. on Wednesday to promote his terrific movie about courage in the face of genocide, Hotel Rwanda (due here in January)
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NEWS
By Peter W. Bardaglio | June 14, 1998
Surrounded by reporters pushing and shoving each other, the nationally known politician says to hell with it and in the glare of television lights and flash bulbs, passionately kisses the young woman who is not his wife. His advisers look at each other in dismay, knowing that their careers have just been flushed down the toilet.President Clinton and Monica Lewinsky? No, it's Warren Beatty, playing Sen. Jay Bulworth and Halle Berry, playing his lover, Nina, who is African-American. Fed up with reciting the worn-out nostrums necessary to get re-elected, Bulworth starts saying exactly what he thinks about the state of race and politics in America.
NEWS
March 30, 2000
Helen Martin, 90, a character actress who played an elderly neighbor in the mid-1980s television series "227" and Halle Berry's matriarch in the political comedy movie "Bulworth," died Saturday in Monterey, Calif. An original member of Harlem's American Negro Theater, Ms. Martin was one of the first black actresses to appear on Broadway, when Orson Welles cast her
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | November 19, 2004
Don Cheadle jolted audiences in the best moments of Warren Beatty's 1998 political burlesque Bulworth (screening Monday night in the Maryland Film Festival's fall series at the Maryland Institute College of Art). As drug overlord "L.D.," he told an unhinged white liberal senator (Beatty) that the gangsta life gave young blacks better moneymaking opportunities than the bankrupt public school system. In D.C. on Wednesday to promote his terrific movie about courage in the face of genocide, Hotel Rwanda (due here in January)
NEWS
March 30, 2000
Helen Martin, 90, a character actress who played an elderly neighbor in the mid-1980s television series "227" and Halle Berry's matriarch in the political comedy movie "Bulworth," died Saturday in Monterey, Calif. An original member of Harlem's American Negro Theater, Ms. Martin was one of the first black actresses to appear on Broadway, when Orson Welles cast her
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | May 7, 1998
IN "Bulworth," Warren Beatty's a politician speaking inconvenient truths in public. Naturally, the movie's a farce. Everybody knows, a truly honest politician is one who, once bought, stays bought. So Beatty's truths are spoken only in the course of a nervous breakdown.He tells a black church congregation to forget getting any help from him - blacks can't afford enough campaign payoffs. He tells a gathering of rich show-biz types that they make crummy movies - while openly wondering where he's misplaced his newest anti-Farrakhan joke, which he always inserts in speeches to patronize any nervous Jews in attendance.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,SUN STAFF | August 27, 1999
They talked for three hours over Chinese take-out. The hosts' children romped about, with no hired help in sight. Ad man Bill Hillsman, "just some schmo from Minneapolis," hung out last week in Los Angeles "talking about some stuff" with none other than actor Warren Beatty.Beatty, a telegenic 62 years of age, has become the celebrity wild card in the 2000 presidential race by hinting he might run for the White House."After 35 years of liberal activism as a Democrat, I am being urged by some people to spend 40 years of fame on a presidential campaign," Beatty wrote Aug. 22 in the New York Times.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,sun film critic | September 6, 1998
The title character of "Simon Birch," which opens in theaters Friday, is a new kind of hero. A pint-sized youngster born with a heart ailment resulting in severe dwarfism, Simon is an acerbic lad, as given to vinegary asides and the occasional vulgarity as to talk of God and transcendent values.Aware that he most likely won't see his 16th birthday, Simon feels he can call things exactly as he sees them (a source of considerable consternation in his tiny New England hometown). And as he sees it, God has a grand, heroic plan for his life, however abbreviated.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | May 30, 1998
HOLLYWOOD'S efforts to deliberately rankle conservatives continue unabated. The latest attempt is Warren Beatty's "Bulworth," which opened nationwide earlier this month.The film has a number of things going for it. Beatty's movie -- he's the co-writer, director and star -- is screamingly funny. In some parts, it is brutally honest.Beatty plays California U.S. Sen. Jay Bulworth, who suddenly loses his mind and, during his re-election campaign, starts uttering truth instead of drivel. He tells a Jewish group that he includes all "the big Jews" on his speaking tours and includes an obligatory derogatory remark about Louis Farrakhan in his speeches.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,SUN STAFF | October 9, 1999
"I hate false modesty," says presidential candidate Milton Armitage. "How can I lose this election? I'm handsome, cultured, debonair, attractive, and I'm manly."Manly Milton from TV's "The Many Lives of Dobie Gillis" was played 40 years ago by none other than the equally handsome and manly Warren Beatty, whose flirtation with a presidential candidacy continues. Beatty, as is often the case with public figures, has a sitcom skeleton in his closet.TV Land, a cable channel dedicated to vintage re-runs, will broadcast the 1959 "Smoke Filled Room" episode at 9 p.m. Sunday, part of a Beatty-inspired "Dobie" mini-marathon from 8 p.m. to 10 p.m. (Check your TV listings for channel information.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,SUN STAFF | August 27, 1999
They talked for three hours over Chinese take-out. The hosts' children romped about, with no hired help in sight. Ad man Bill Hillsman, "just some schmo from Minneapolis," hung out last week in Los Angeles "talking about some stuff" with none other than actor Warren Beatty.Beatty, a telegenic 62 years of age, has become the celebrity wild card in the 2000 presidential race by hinting he might run for the White House."After 35 years of liberal activism as a Democrat, I am being urged by some people to spend 40 years of fame on a presidential campaign," Beatty wrote Aug. 22 in the New York Times.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,sun film critic | September 6, 1998
The title character of "Simon Birch," which opens in theaters Friday, is a new kind of hero. A pint-sized youngster born with a heart ailment resulting in severe dwarfism, Simon is an acerbic lad, as given to vinegary asides and the occasional vulgarity as to talk of God and transcendent values.Aware that he most likely won't see his 16th birthday, Simon feels he can call things exactly as he sees them (a source of considerable consternation in his tiny New England hometown). And as he sees it, God has a grand, heroic plan for his life, however abbreviated.
NEWS
By Peter W. Bardaglio | June 14, 1998
Surrounded by reporters pushing and shoving each other, the nationally known politician says to hell with it and in the glare of television lights and flash bulbs, passionately kisses the young woman who is not his wife. His advisers look at each other in dismay, knowing that their careers have just been flushed down the toilet.President Clinton and Monica Lewinsky? No, it's Warren Beatty, playing Sen. Jay Bulworth and Halle Berry, playing his lover, Nina, who is African-American. Fed up with reciting the worn-out nostrums necessary to get re-elected, Bulworth starts saying exactly what he thinks about the state of race and politics in America.
NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | May 30, 1998
HOLLYWOOD'S efforts to deliberately rankle conservatives continue unabated. The latest attempt is Warren Beatty's "Bulworth," which opened nationwide earlier this month.The film has a number of things going for it. Beatty's movie -- he's the co-writer, director and star -- is screamingly funny. In some parts, it is brutally honest.Beatty plays California U.S. Sen. Jay Bulworth, who suddenly loses his mind and, during his re-election campaign, starts uttering truth instead of drivel. He tells a Jewish group that he includes all "the big Jews" on his speaking tours and includes an obligatory derogatory remark about Louis Farrakhan in his speeches.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | May 22, 1998
In the scorchingly funny political satire "Bulworth," Warren Beatty is a man possessed, a holy fool tilting at the windmills of contemporary political culture, an idiot worthy of Dostoevsky, whose compulsive, vulgar pronouncements take on the proportions of greatness the more he blathers on.Love "Bulworth" or hate it. Laugh at it or moan out loud. But by all means see it, and celebrate the fact that a mainstream movie has been made in which something of real meaning is at stake.Beatty -- who wrote, directed and produced -- also stars in the title role of Jay Bulworth, a Democratic senator from California who is just days away from a shoo-in re-election.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | May 22, 1998
In the scorchingly funny political satire "Bulworth," Warren Beatty is a man possessed, a holy fool tilting at the windmills of contemporary political culture, an idiot worthy of Dostoevsky, whose compulsive, vulgar pronouncements take on the proportions of greatness the more he blathers on.Love "Bulworth" or hate it. Laugh at it or moan out loud. But by all means see it, and celebrate the fact that a mainstream movie has been made in which something of real meaning is at stake.Beatty -- who wrote, directed and produced -- also stars in the title role of Jay Bulworth, a Democratic senator from California who is just days away from a shoo-in re-election.
FEATURES
By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,SUN STAFF | October 9, 1999
"I hate false modesty," says presidential candidate Milton Armitage. "How can I lose this election? I'm handsome, cultured, debonair, attractive, and I'm manly."Manly Milton from TV's "The Many Lives of Dobie Gillis" was played 40 years ago by none other than the equally handsome and manly Warren Beatty, whose flirtation with a presidential candidacy continues. Beatty, as is often the case with public figures, has a sitcom skeleton in his closet.TV Land, a cable channel dedicated to vintage re-runs, will broadcast the 1959 "Smoke Filled Room" episode at 9 p.m. Sunday, part of a Beatty-inspired "Dobie" mini-marathon from 8 p.m. to 10 p.m. (Check your TV listings for channel information.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | May 7, 1998
IN "Bulworth," Warren Beatty's a politician speaking inconvenient truths in public. Naturally, the movie's a farce. Everybody knows, a truly honest politician is one who, once bought, stays bought. So Beatty's truths are spoken only in the course of a nervous breakdown.He tells a black church congregation to forget getting any help from him - blacks can't afford enough campaign payoffs. He tells a gathering of rich show-biz types that they make crummy movies - while openly wondering where he's misplaced his newest anti-Farrakhan joke, which he always inserts in speeches to patronize any nervous Jews in attendance.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J.D. Considine CLASSICAL Kirov Opera conducted by Valery Gergiev | April 30, 1998
'Bulworth'The Soundtrack (Interscope 90160)They're boastful, verbose, self-aggrandizing, contentious - when you think about it, there are a lot of traits that politicians and rap stars have in common. So it shouldn't seem too strange to find a rap soundtrack behind "Bulworth," Warren Beatty's new Washington-based political comedy.Don't get the wrong idea, though. Despite a photo inside the CD booklet that shows a sweat-suited Beatty getting down with a group of gold-chain-wearing rappers, "Bulworth: The Soundtrack" doesn't waste time with fake, Hollywood-style hip-hop.
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