Advertisement
HomeCollectionsBull Shark
IN THE NEWS

Bull Shark

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | July 22, 2014
A sighting of a bull shark off Sandy Point State Park Monday prompted a brief closure of one of the swimming areas, but the park's manager said the popular Chesapeake Bay beach returned to "business as usual" on Tuesday after seeing no more of the wide-ranging predator. Ranger Steve McCoy, Sandy Point's manager, said a fisherman reported seeing a small bull shark around 5:30 p.m. Monday near the east beach. A ranger walked out on the rock jetty jutting into the water and confirmed seeing some type of shark, McCoy said, so park personnel moved "a handful of people" to the lifeguard-monitored main beach in another area of the park and kept a close watch on the shark.
ARTICLES BY DATE
TRAVEL
By Sean Welsh, The Baltimore Sun | August 4, 2014
A 12-foot tiger shark may have slipped past locals, but it made an appearance in Ocean City over the weekend according to a non-profit that studies sharks. Septima a 1,000-pound, 12-foot-8-inch female shark tagged by researchers at Ocearch surfaced twice in the Isle of Wight Bay, which empties into the Atlantic at the inlet, between 2:29 and 3:10 p.m. on Aug. 1, according to tracking equipment managed by the non-profit. Ocearch tagged the mature shark on May 30 this year and has tracked its movements since, with pings along the Atlantic Coast from the Carolinas to the New Jersey area, where it was last recorded on Monday afternoon.
Advertisement
SPORTS
By Don Markus and The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2013
Greg Dean was away in college at Salisbury University when his father, Willy Dean, caught a bull shark in 2010. Greg shared the experience, but only vicariously. The younger Dean, who returned to the family's Southern Maryland home in Scotland after graduating this year and joined the family's commercial fishing business, got the same experience firsthand last week. Fishing off Point Lookout State Park early Tuesday, the Deans and friend Rich Riche pulled in two bull sharks that had become entangled in the 20-foot nets they use mostly to catch menhaden.
FEATURES
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | July 22, 2014
A sighting of a bull shark off Sandy Point State Park Monday prompted a brief closure of one of the swimming areas, but the park's manager said the popular Chesapeake Bay beach returned to "business as usual" on Tuesday after seeing no more of the wide-ranging predator. Ranger Steve McCoy, Sandy Point's manager, said a fisherman reported seeing a small bull shark around 5:30 p.m. Monday near the east beach. A ranger walked out on the rock jetty jutting into the water and confirmed seeing some type of shark, McCoy said, so park personnel moved "a handful of people" to the lifeguard-monitored main beach in another area of the park and kept a close watch on the shark.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | July 29, 2011
Nick Caloyianis has cheated death by shark at least twice in his career as an award-winning underwater videographer. Somewhere in his basement are the jaws of a bull shark that almost tore off his foot in 1993. And sitting in his neatly manicured backyard is a shark cage that was battered off the Cape Cod coast last summer by the largest great white shark ever captured on film in New England. Caloyianis, on assignment for Discovery Channel's Shark Week, was holding the camera.
TRAVEL
By Sean Welsh, The Baltimore Sun | August 4, 2014
A 12-foot tiger shark may have slipped past locals, but it made an appearance in Ocean City over the weekend according to a non-profit that studies sharks. Septima a 1,000-pound, 12-foot-8-inch female shark tagged by researchers at Ocearch surfaced twice in the Isle of Wight Bay, which empties into the Atlantic at the inlet, between 2:29 and 3:10 p.m. on Aug. 1, according to tracking equipment managed by the non-profit. Ocearch tagged the mature shark on May 30 this year and has tracked its movements since, with pings along the Atlantic Coast from the Carolinas to the New Jersey area, where it was last recorded on Monday afternoon.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Staff writer | August 21, 1993
Nick Caloyianis thinks sharks have irresistible charisma -- and he knows they have sharp teeth.The Catonsville-based underwater filmmaker, one of a half-dozen or so in the world who specialize in filming sharks, has a red and purple scar on his right leg to remind him -- a wound that looks a lot like a shark's swept-fin body.While filming an agitated bull shark off Mexico's Isla Mujeres last year for National Geographic, Mr. Caloyianis nearly lost his foot and suffered severe hand lacerations when the animal attacked.
NEWS
By Janet Gilbert | August 27, 2010
There was a time when I could easily lure my three young children in from their summer-night street games with the bait of the Discovery Channel's "Shark Week. " We would all gather on the family room couch to watch the frighteningly close-up, spectacular shots of feeding frenzies — fins and teeth chopping the water into a Bass-o-matic froth filmed by a brave diver in an underwater cage. A narrator — with all the inflection and dynamism of Dick Cheney — would relate key facts about the class Chondrichthyes as well as salient environmental and habitat issues.
FEATURES
August 22, 2001
Not since a Great White stormed across movie screens in the 1975 summer thriller Jaws has the shark in its many toothy varieties set beach-goers so on edge - or at least gotten them talking. This summer's scare began with the attack of 8-year-old Jessie Arbogast, whose arm was torn off by a bull shark July 8 in shallow waters off Pensacola, Fla. The boy's uncle pried open the shark's mouth to free the child, whose severed arm later was reattached. Other shark sightings and scares followed.
NEWS
By Jon Glass and Jon Glass,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | December 16, 2001
VIRGINIA BEACH, Va. - Despite two high-profile, fatal shark attacks in September, the chance of being attacked by a shark along Virginia's shoreline remains extremely slim, according to a state task force investigating the incidents. There was no "rogue" shark involved in the two fatal shark attacks over Labor Day weekend at Sandbridge and Hatteras Island, N.C., task force members said. Sharks have plenty of food to eat and have not begun preying on humans. And, while shark populations remain severely distressed because of past overfishing, they are not suddenly lurking in larger numbers off the beach, the task force believes.
SPORTS
By Don Markus and The Baltimore Sun | August 25, 2013
Greg Dean was away in college at Salisbury University when his father, Willy Dean, caught a bull shark in 2010. Greg shared the experience, but only vicariously. The younger Dean, who returned to the family's Southern Maryland home in Scotland after graduating this year and joined the family's commercial fishing business, got the same experience firsthand last week. Fishing off Point Lookout State Park early Tuesday, the Deans and friend Rich Riche pulled in two bull sharks that had become entangled in the 20-foot nets they use mostly to catch menhaden.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson, The Baltimore Sun | July 29, 2011
Nick Caloyianis has cheated death by shark at least twice in his career as an award-winning underwater videographer. Somewhere in his basement are the jaws of a bull shark that almost tore off his foot in 1993. And sitting in his neatly manicured backyard is a shark cage that was battered off the Cape Cod coast last summer by the largest great white shark ever captured on film in New England. Caloyianis, on assignment for Discovery Channel's Shark Week, was holding the camera.
NEWS
By Janet Gilbert | August 29, 2010
There was a time when I could easily lure my three young children in from their summer-night street games with the bait of the Discovery Channel's "Shark Week. " We would all gather on the family room couch to watch the frighteningly close-up, spectacular shots of feeding frenzies — fins and teeth chopping the water into a Bass-o-matic froth filmed by a brave diver in an underwater cage. A narrator — with all the inflection and dynamism of Dick Cheney — would relate key facts about the class Chondrichthyes as well as salient environmental and habitat issues.
NEWS
By Jon Glass and Jon Glass,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | December 16, 2001
VIRGINIA BEACH, Va. - Despite two high-profile, fatal shark attacks in September, the chance of being attacked by a shark along Virginia's shoreline remains extremely slim, according to a state task force investigating the incidents. There was no "rogue" shark involved in the two fatal shark attacks over Labor Day weekend at Sandbridge and Hatteras Island, N.C., task force members said. Sharks have plenty of food to eat and have not begun preying on humans. And, while shark populations remain severely distressed because of past overfishing, they are not suddenly lurking in larger numbers off the beach, the task force believes.
FEATURES
August 22, 2001
Not since a Great White stormed across movie screens in the 1975 summer thriller Jaws has the shark in its many toothy varieties set beach-goers so on edge - or at least gotten them talking. This summer's scare began with the attack of 8-year-old Jessie Arbogast, whose arm was torn off by a bull shark July 8 in shallow waters off Pensacola, Fla. The boy's uncle pried open the shark's mouth to free the child, whose severed arm later was reattached. Other shark sightings and scares followed.
FEATURES
By Steve McKerrow and Steve McKerrow,Staff writer | August 21, 1993
Nick Caloyianis thinks sharks have irresistible charisma -- and he knows they have sharp teeth.The Catonsville-based underwater filmmaker, one of a half-dozen or so in the world who specialize in filming sharks, has a red and purple scar on his right leg to remind him -- a wound that looks a lot like a shark's swept-fin body.While filming an agitated bull shark off Mexico's Isla Mujeres last year for National Geographic, Mr. Caloyianis nearly lost his foot and suffered severe hand lacerations when the animal attacked.
SPORTS
By PETER BAKER | July 30, 1995
The mere mention of it brought laughter from my children and a quizzical look from my wife. A neighbor agreed to go along, but he, too, was skeptical."
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.