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By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2014
You've seen the photos and the crazy video . Maybe you even caught a glimpse of that poor, doomed steer prancing through the streets of Baltimore. Now the iconic image of a steer* walking under a sign for "Lake Trout Fried Chicken" can live on in your home. Former Baltimore resident Maya Livio posted the image to the indie designer site Society6 this afternoon. You can order wall hangings , tshirts , iPhone cases and even a shower curtain with the image.
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FEATURES
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2014
You've seen the photos and the crazy video . Maybe you even caught a glimpse of that poor, doomed steer prancing through the streets of Baltimore. Now the iconic image of a steer* walking under a sign for "Lake Trout Fried Chicken" can live on in your home. Former Baltimore resident Maya Livio posted the image to the indie designer site Society6 this afternoon. You can order wall hangings , tshirts , iPhone cases and even a shower curtain with the image.
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NEWS
February 15, 1991
The Dow Jones average has been surging this month for reasons that cannot be immediately explained by market analysts.But we suspect we know what was behind the intermittent booms: There has been a land office business in the stock of 4-cent stamps, which have to be used with the many 25-cent stamps that are still left over.Judging from our own desperation to avoid spending 50 cents to send a letter, we wouldn't be surprised if the sought-after commodity has been going for as much as a dime!
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | August 10, 2013
During the depth of the 2008 financial crisis when Bill Miller's funds were in free fall, a colleague advised him to get a dog. "I needed to change my luck," said the Legg Mason money manager, famous for beating the market 15 years in a row. "I reasoned that to have a bull market, you need a 'bull' dog of some sort. " Miller, 63, settled on an English bulldog he named after boxer Jake "Raging Bull" LaMotta. "The bulldog was the reason the market recovered," Miller said during a recent interview at Legg's headquarters in Baltimore's Harbor East.
BUSINESS
By Herb Greenberg and Herb Greenberg,Chronicle Features | February 1, 1991
The market's recent strength is causing some growls in the bear cave, and for good reason: The rally seems unstoppable.Gurus who were neutral or negative just a few weeks ago, such as Martin Zweig of Zweig Forecast, now marvel at how the technical indicators -- such as charts and moving averages -- are at their most-bullish levels in years. The market rise is causing carnage among some short-sellers, especially the amateurs who don't have the financial staying power (or the stomach) to remain bearish.
NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | March 13, 2013
Last Friday, the Labor Department reported that 236,000 new jobs were created in February. That's good news -- but not nearly good enough. Even if this rate were to continue, which seems unlikely, the United States wouldn't be back to pre-recession levels of unemployment for another four years. American workers remain in a bear market. More than 12 million Americans are still without work. Another 8 million are working part time but would rather be working full time. Many have given up looking.
BUSINESS
By Bill Atkinson and Bill Atkinson,Sun Staff | January 24, 1999
The bull market may be aging, but it still has plenty of kick.Not even a spate of disasters last year, including the White House sex scandal and Russia's crumbling ruble, could put an end to it. And experts are betting that the longest-running bull market in financial history will climb higher this year."
BUSINESS
By David Conn and David Conn,Staff Writer | November 12, 1992
Get out your checkbooks, sit back and enjoy the bulls' run for another year. That's the gospel according to Garzarelli.Elaine Garzarelli, Shearson Lehman Bros.' acclaimed quantitative analyst, brought her sunny message of continued stock gains to Baltimore's Center Club yesterday, and included a specific prediction: The Dow Jones industrial average would reach 3,650 or above by the end of next year -- more than 12.5 percent above yesterday's close of 3240.33"Any correction, as far as I'm concerned, is a gift [to prospective investors]
NEWS
By William Pfaff | January 26, 1999
PARIS -- The proposition that the stock market will keep going up because the U.S. government cannot afford to let it go down is a new aspect of the American version of corporate socialism: public support for investors, justified by the fact that if things go badly for them they will go worse for everyone else.The rest of the world is included in this since the amount of foreign money invested on Wall Street is the largest in history, and because as the economist David Hale writes, the world economy depends "on a robust U.S. equity market to sustain America's role as the world economy's spender of last resort."
NEWS
By Robert Reno | September 19, 1999
BEFORE HE was arrested this past week, Martin A. Armstrong was scheduled to address the Canadian Society of Technical Analysts next month.A sought-after speaker and self-proclaimed investment genius whose conferences featured celebrities like Margaret Thatcher, Mr. Armstrong owned an economic model -- or so his firm, Princeton Economics International, boasted -- that had correctly forecast the stock market crash of 1987, the bond market collapse of 1994...
NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | August 7, 2013
Job growth is sputtering. So why aren't the captains of American industry and finance -- the nation's top CEOs, the titans of Wall Street, the corporate movers and shakers -- demanding that more be done to revive the economy? They have the political clout to make it happen. It can't be they don't know that job growth is sputtering. The data are indisputable. July's job growth of 162,000 jobs was the weakest in four months. The average workweek was the shortest in six months. The Bureau of Labor Statistics has also lowered its estimates of hiring during May and June.
NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | March 13, 2013
Last Friday, the Labor Department reported that 236,000 new jobs were created in February. That's good news -- but not nearly good enough. Even if this rate were to continue, which seems unlikely, the United States wouldn't be back to pre-recession levels of unemployment for another four years. American workers remain in a bear market. More than 12 million Americans are still without work. Another 8 million are working part time but would rather be working full time. Many have given up looking.
NEWS
March 6, 2013
Economist John Kenneth Galbraith once observed that there are two kinds of market forecasters, those who don't know and those who don't know they don't know. That is well illustrated by the current disconnect between Wall Street and Main Street, as the market's leading indicator, the Dow Jones Industrial Average, continues to surge forward while the overall outlook for the U.S. economy appears mixed at best. The Dow closed Tuesday at an all-time peak of 14,253.77, and many believe that the bullish trend will continue even if there is some profit-taking in the short term.
BUSINESS
July 14, 2009
Investors of all ages have seen their portfolios take a hit in this bear market. But will losses have a greater effect on younger investors, making them less likely to buy stocks in the future? Some academics think so. With little investing experience under their belt, young investors might conclude they should avoid stocks after last year's market plunge. Yet, if history is any guide, young investors could become big winners if they invest in stocks during a bear market and reap the rewards when those shares appreciate later in a bull market.
BUSINESS
By MARY UMBERGER and MARY UMBERGER,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | November 6, 2005
SAN FRANCISCO -- America's historic real estate boom is cresting, and the rate at which home prices appreciate should begin to slow significantly next year, according to the chief economic forecaster for the National Association of Realtors. It was the closest statement yet to an admission by the real estate industry that the bull market for housing may have run its course. "It's the peak of the boom," David Lereah said at the Chicago-based trade group's annual meeting here, which concluded last week.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Leckey | July 10, 2005
Stuart, a puckish young man, was once the unlikely symbol of stock investing in America. His Ameritrade TV commercials of several years ago included one in which he photocopied his face for a party invitation, showed his boss how to trade online and then invited the boss to a party. Stuart explained to an older generation that online trading was easy and loads of fun. But that fun part of buying stocks is missing in 2005, a year of lackluster returns and aftershocks from regulatory investigations, settlements and fines.
NEWS
By Robert Reno | November 8, 1999
NEW YORK More than 48 percent of American households now own stocks, up from only 19 percent in 1983.This glorious news comes from a survey of 4,843 households conducted by the Securities Industries Association and the Investment Company Institute and may well represent one of the most spectacular expansions of the stock-holding class in recorded history.But it also tells us a lot of other things, among them that more than half of households don't own a dime in stocks, still haven't even a pauper's share in the greatest bull market in history.
BUSINESS
By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,New York Bureau | September 7, 1993
NEW YORK -- As Wall Street types return from the Hamptons today to do battle in the nation's financial markets, they can look back over the summer and take some satisfaction that the stock market managed a modest rally.Or at least some of them can.That's because the summer rally took many on the Street by surprise, with several leading market strategists having predicted a "correction" (a Wall Street euphemism for a moderate crash followed by more good times) for the past few months. Stocks were overpriced, the argument went and money couldn't continue to pour into the market.
TOPIC
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | December 12, 2004
THE IDEA that the Maryland Department of Natural Resources is considering the sale of pieces of state-owned land totaling 3,000 acres has enflamed environmental advocates who fear that the Ehrlich administration is endangering treasured public spaces in a period of relentless development sprawl. But some experts say that private ownership of land is not necessarily incompatible with preserving Maryland's rural landscape. These free-market environmentalists point to tools such as conservation easements and the proliferation of land trusts as proof that a robust market exists for preservation.
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose and Eileen Ambrose,SUN STAFF | April 3, 2003
Positive news on the war front, including the rescue of an American prisoner of war, lifted Wall Street spirits and stock prices yesterday. The Dow Jones industrial average gained 215 points. "The market the last four or five weeks has just been trading on the war news, and so spirits kind of ebb and flow as the news over them comes in better or worse," said David Straus, a senior portfolio manager with Johnston Lemon Asset Management in Washington. The Dow closed up 215.20 at 8,285.06, a gain of 2.67 percent.
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