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Bull Durham

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By Ron Shelton and Ron Shelton,Special to Tribune Newspapers | July 21, 2009
Writer-director Ron Shelton (Bull Durham, White Men Can't Jump, Tin Cup) spent five years playing infield in the Orioles' minor league system. He was a little guy, which was shocking at first, with short arms, thick glasses and an easy smile. They called him "Dalko" and guys liked to hang with him and women wanted to take care of him and if he walked into a room in those days he was probably drunk. He had a record 14 feet long inside the Bakersfield, Calif., police station, all barroom brawls, nothing serious, the cops said.
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By Michael Sragow, The Baltimore Sun | March 30, 2012
Kevin Costner, a superstar for two dozen years, hasn't had a big film hit in years. But overseas and out of camera sight, he's been renewing connections with international fans — as a singer. Releasing CDs in Europe while performing on three continents, he's won a global following as a country-tinged rocker, punching out songs that fit his native-Californian, rambling-child-of-the-'60s spirit. And now he's bringing it all back home. Costner and his band, Modern West, are putting the final touches on a concept album inspired by the History Channel miniseries, "Hatfields & McCoys," a three-night dramatization of the epochal feud starring Costner as "Devil" Anse Hatfield, airing Memorial Day weekend.
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By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | April 6, 2008
Bull Durham contains so much pungent dialogue you'd never guess its greatest speech wound up on the cutting-room floor. In the script to the first film written and directed by Ron Shelton, a former second baseman in the Baltimore Orioles' farm system, veteran minor-league catcher Crash Davis (Kevin Costner) asks baseball muse and groupie Annie Savoy (Susan Sarandon), "Why baseball?" Annie explains: "If you know where home plate is, then you know where first base is, and second, and everything else - 'cause they're always in the same place in relation to home.
SPORTS
By Ron Shelton and Ron Shelton,Special to Tribune Newspapers | July 21, 2009
Writer-director Ron Shelton (Bull Durham, White Men Can't Jump, Tin Cup) spent five years playing infield in the Orioles' minor league system. He was a little guy, which was shocking at first, with short arms, thick glasses and an easy smile. They called him "Dalko" and guys liked to hang with him and women wanted to take care of him and if he walked into a room in those days he was probably drunk. He had a record 14 feet long inside the Bakersfield, Calif., police station, all barroom brawls, nothing serious, the cops said.
SPORTS
By DAN CONNOLLY | September 19, 2008
My favorite of all time is Annie Savoy, Susan Sarandon's groupie literature professor in Bull Durham. She's sexy, smart, knows literature and baseball, and even references the Frank Robinson-Milt Pappas trade. I mean, come on. Groupie or not, that's a perfect woman. (For more, go to baltimoresun.com/cornersportsbar)
NEWS
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | April 1, 2007
It's a long season, and you got to trust it. I've tried 'em all -- I really have -- and the only church that truly feeds the soul, day in, day out, is the Church of Baseball. SO SAYS ANNIE SAVOY, THE hyper-literate and earthy muse of the minor league Durham Bulls, played by Susan Sarandon in Bull Durham, writer / director Ron Shelton's classic baseball film. Beginning this week, millions will join Annie's congregation, as they do each year, in cathedrals from Camden Yards to Fenway Park.
SPORTS
By MILTON KENT NNTC | June 26, 1994
So, let's assume there really is a baseball strike on the horizon. True fans of the National Pasttime will need to turn somewhere, anywhere, for a baseball fix. You could watch the World Cup (yawn) or find solace from the cinema, which has produced no shortage of diamond-related flicks. "Winners and Losers" turns Siskel and Ebert to guide your baseball movie selections.2(MOVIES.. .. .. .. .. .. .. .. ..COMMENT"Pastime" ... ..Winner .. .. .. .Little known gem about older.. .. .. .. .. ... .. .. .. .. ..white minor-leaguer befriending.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Susan King and Susan King,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 4, 2005
Baseball movies have been very good to Kevin Costner. Well, two anyway: 1988's Bull Durham and 1989's Field of Dreams. It is doubtful Costner includes the dreadful 1982 obscurity Chasing Dreams on his resume, and 1999's For Love of the Game did not exactly hit a home run. Although his latest film, The Upside of Anger (New Line, $28) is not a baseball film, the dramedy casts Costner as a former baseball player turned sports radio host. And he gives one of his most casual, engaging performances as the charming, hard-living, hard-drinking Denny - sort of a close relative to his Crash Davis of Bull Durham - who sets his romantic sights on his neighbor (Joan Allen, in fine form)
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | January 21, 2000
"Play It to the Bone" is Ron Shelton on autopilot. Shelton, the gifted writer-director of such sports-as-life mainstays as "Bull Durham," "White Men Can't Jump" and "Tin Cup," loves making films where the jocks do battle with words as much as with their muscles. At his best -- and films don't come much better than 1988's "Bull Durham," where Kevin Costner and Susan Sarandon made baseball seem exciting, intellectual and sexy -- the results are lighthearted, character-driven valentines to the ethos of sport, propelled by literate scripts that reveal as much about the people who engage in sports as about the sports themselves.
FEATURES
By Frank Bruni and Frank Bruni,Knight-Ridder News Service | July 20, 1994
Back in 1987, when "Bull Durham" was being cast, Susan Sarandon had to pay for her own flight from Europe, where she happened to be staying, to America for an audition.In 1991, when "Lorenzo's Oil" came around, she got tapped to play the female lead only after Michelle Pfeiffer took a pass.But last year, when "The Client" was being decided, Ms. Sarandon was the first choice. She hadn't even expressed interest.Director Joel Schumacher envisioned her and no one else in the plum part of Reggie Love, a scrappy attorney with a big but bruised heart.
SPORTS
By NEWS SERVICE AND WEB REPORTS | October 6, 2008
If Tampa Bay Rays third baseman Evan Longoria can keep his career on the same trajectory, someday people might be asking Eva Longoria whether she is related to him. But, for now, the questions still lean toward the Desperate Housewives actress' direction. As in part of this interview with the Big League Stew blog: Why does every picture of you on the Internet look like the woman who's married to Tony Parker? We're not going to go through the whole interview talking about this, are we?
SPORTS
By DAN CONNOLLY | September 19, 2008
My favorite of all time is Annie Savoy, Susan Sarandon's groupie literature professor in Bull Durham. She's sexy, smart, knows literature and baseball, and even references the Frank Robinson-Milt Pappas trade. I mean, come on. Groupie or not, that's a perfect woman. (For more, go to baltimoresun.com/cornersportsbar)
NEWS
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | April 6, 2008
Bull Durham contains so much pungent dialogue you'd never guess its greatest speech wound up on the cutting-room floor. In the script to the first film written and directed by Ron Shelton, a former second baseman in the Baltimore Orioles' farm system, veteran minor-league catcher Crash Davis (Kevin Costner) asks baseball muse and groupie Annie Savoy (Susan Sarandon), "Why baseball?" Annie explains: "If you know where home plate is, then you know where first base is, and second, and everything else - 'cause they're always in the same place in relation to home.
NEWS
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | April 1, 2007
It's a long season, and you got to trust it. I've tried 'em all -- I really have -- and the only church that truly feeds the soul, day in, day out, is the Church of Baseball. SO SAYS ANNIE SAVOY, THE hyper-literate and earthy muse of the minor league Durham Bulls, played by Susan Sarandon in Bull Durham, writer / director Ron Shelton's classic baseball film. Beginning this week, millions will join Annie's congregation, as they do each year, in cathedrals from Camden Yards to Fenway Park.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Susan King and Susan King,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 4, 2005
Baseball movies have been very good to Kevin Costner. Well, two anyway: 1988's Bull Durham and 1989's Field of Dreams. It is doubtful Costner includes the dreadful 1982 obscurity Chasing Dreams on his resume, and 1999's For Love of the Game did not exactly hit a home run. Although his latest film, The Upside of Anger (New Line, $28) is not a baseball film, the dramedy casts Costner as a former baseball player turned sports radio host. And he gives one of his most casual, engaging performances as the charming, hard-living, hard-drinking Denny - sort of a close relative to his Crash Davis of Bull Durham - who sets his romantic sights on his neighbor (Joan Allen, in fine form)
FEATURES
By Jonathan Pitts and Jonathan Pitts,SUN STAFF | March 30, 2002
Any sports movie has a dual task: to simulate the game of choice (football, hockey, golf) and to unfurl its characters' journeys against that backdrop. Ex-ballplayer and first-time director Ron Shelton pulled it off in Bull Durham (1988), a film whose world was so steeped in authentic detail we could care about the characters. But hockey fans cringed at the sight of Rob Lowe's efforts to skate in Youngblood (1986), and seamheads winced at the double debacle of William Bendix (1948) and John Goodman (1992)
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | February 20, 1995
Career tip: If you ever become a film critic and you get an interview with Ron Shelton, writer-director of "Cobb" and before that "Bull Durham," do not say to him, "Oh, weren't you a semi-pro ballplayer?"No, sir. No semi about it, not a bit. Shelton will have you know, in long and tedious detail, that he was an authentic professional baseball player, in the farm system of no less than the Baltimore Orioles. Never made it to the bigs, though."Low and away slider," he says with a laugh. But Shelton therefore brings to his sports films -- he also did "White Men Can't Jump" and "Blaze," about Huey Long and Blaze Starr -- an awareness of what an athlete's life is truly like, as opposed to the sentimentalized version that has appeared in so many other movies.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | August 13, 1996
Happy 97th, Mr. Hitchcock, wherever you are."Days of Thunder" (8 p.m.-10 p.m., WJZ, Channel 13) -- Tom Cruise races cars around a track, with help from Robert Duvall as his legendary crew chief, Harry Hogge. Ho hum, you say. True, but this is also the movie where Cruise met his eventual leading-lady-for-life (or at least, life for now) Nicole Kidman, who would soon become Mrs. Tom. Here, she plays a neurosurgeon who likes Tom just fine, but isn't crazy about his choice of profession. CBS."
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | September 9, 2001
Whether she was calling Nashville "the funniest epic vision of America ever to reach the screen" or the 1978 Invasion of the Body Snatchers "the best movie of its kind ever made," Pauline Kael always meant exactly what she said. When I think of her critical vocabulary, I recall slang she used so distinctively that she might as well have patented it -- like "zizzy." Or words she used in combina-tions that were uniquely hers, like "rotten-rich." She was too wary of theory and repetition to rely on critical catchphrases or inject her words with inflated meaning.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | January 21, 2000
"Play It to the Bone" is Ron Shelton on autopilot. Shelton, the gifted writer-director of such sports-as-life mainstays as "Bull Durham," "White Men Can't Jump" and "Tin Cup," loves making films where the jocks do battle with words as much as with their muscles. At his best -- and films don't come much better than 1988's "Bull Durham," where Kevin Costner and Susan Sarandon made baseball seem exciting, intellectual and sexy -- the results are lighthearted, character-driven valentines to the ethos of sport, propelled by literate scripts that reveal as much about the people who engage in sports as about the sports themselves.
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