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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,sun reporter | May 16, 2007
William King Pound, a decorated World War II tank commander who fought at the Battle of the Bulge and later established an advertising agency, died of primary lateral sclerosis May 8 at his Catonsville home. He was 82. Born in Baltimore and raised in the Ten Hills neighborhood, Mr. Pound was a 1942 graduate of Mount St. Joseph High School. After briefly attending Loyola College, he enlisted in the Army in 1943. He was a gunner on an M5 light tank assigned to the 4th Armored Division of Gen. George S. Patton Jr.'s 3rd Army when he landed on Utah Beach in June 1944, two weeks after the D-Day Normandy invasion.
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NEWS
By Josh Mitchell and Josh Mitchell,Sun reporter | April 28, 2007
Henry J. Roth cheated fate in 1944 when severely swollen feet earned him a coveted seat on a train to an English hospital, weeks before his Army division was pounded by advancing Germans in the Battle of the Bulge. Sixty-three years later, a faded relic from his foxhole arrived at Roth's home in Catonsville. Roth, an 85-year-old retired accountant, received the package this week from Belgium. As his mailman and wife looked on, Roth opened the box and pulled out a dark green canvas duffel bag, emblazoned with stenciled lettering: "Henry J. Roth 33383648" It didn't take long for Roth to recognize the bag. It had once contained some of his Army gear and a picture of his wife.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN REPORTER | October 30, 2006
August T. McColgan Sr., a decorated World War II veteran who went on to handle one of the Army's toughest public relations assignments, died of cancer Thursday at Stella Maris Hospice. The longtime Towson resident was 86. Born in Baltimore, he graduated in 1938 from Mount St. Joseph High School. He joined the 5th Regiment of the Maryland National Guard in 1935 while still in school. When the Guard was called into federal service in 1941, he was assigned to train soldiers at Fort A.P. Hill in Virginia.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | August 27, 2006
STERLING, Va. -- About 55 million youngsters are enrolling for classes in the nation's schools this fall, making this the largest group of students in America's history and, in ethnic terms, the most dazzlingly diverse since waves of European immigrants washed through the public schools a century ago. Millions of baby boomers and foreign-born parents are enrolling their children, sending a demographic bulge through the schools that is driving a surge...
NEWS
By JOHN-JOHN WILLIAMS IV and JOHN-JOHN WILLIAMS IV,SUN REPORTER | February 3, 2006
Stung by criticism from parents about a plan that would ban fatty, sugary snacks at after-school concession stands, the school board is planning to revise its proposed nutrition and wellness policy, deemed one of the most strict in the country. Several booster club members and parents of students in other after-school activities had complained that the policy - being drafted to meet a state mandate - would hurt fundraising, sending school officials back to the drawing board. "They were concerned that we went a little too far by regulating what is sold after the school day is over," Raymond Brown, the school system's chief operating officer, said of the public response.
FEATURES
By CARL SCHOETTLER and CARL SCHOETTLER,SUN REPORTER | December 15, 2005
John Trovato is a familiar figure on the benches and in the bars and restaurants of Little Italy, where he likes to end his days with a dram of Grand Marnier and a cappuccino at Da Mimmo. He lives next door, just a half-block from the corner store on High Street where he was born 91 years ago yesterday. He's spent most of his life here in the 200 block of High St., where about 100 years ago, his father, Orazio, an immigrant from Sicily, started the store where Apicella's deli is now. Trovato has hardly ever left Little Italy, or even his block.
NEWS
By TOMAS ALEX TIZON | October 23, 2005
BEND, Ore. -- Half an hour west of this mountain town in central Oregon, in an area covered by forest, is a growing bulge in the terrain that eager scientists say could be the beginnings of a volcano. The bulge covers 100 square miles and is rising at a rate of 1.4 inches a year. The shape resembles a dome, with the highest point about 3 miles west of the South Sister volcano in the Cascade Range. Geologists say the bulge represents a unique opportunity to study what could be a volcanic formation in its earliest stages, but officials in this town of 65,000 worry more about the potential hazards, such as lava and ash or flying rocks.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,SUN STAFF | March 16, 2005
BOWIE - The vibrations were bad for Bowie State even before the opening tip-off. The Bulldogs were hit with a technical foul for dunking in warm-ups, Luqman Jaaber made both free throws, and then Duan Crockett scored off the jump ball to give Virginia Union a hasty 4-0 lead. Matters only turned worse for Bowie in the first half and Virginia Union parlayed its early momentum into a 70-64 victory and the Division II South Atlantic Regional championship before an overflow crowd at A.C. Jordan Arena.
TRAVEL
By Jody Jaffe and John Muncie and Jody Jaffe and John Muncie,Special to the Sun | September 12, 2004
We went to Dixon's Furniture Auction on the Eastern Shore looking for a garden bench. Eight hours, $298, four lime snowballs and one sunburn later, we left with: Two garden benches ($20) Three stained-glass windows ($230) Two nightstands ($40) One wrought iron table ($5) Two blue plates (free) One glass cream and sugar set (free) Half a roasted chicken ($3) If we'd found a partridge in a pear tree, we probably would have bought that, too. That's the way it is at Dixon's, the weekly junk / furniture / whatever auction that dealers say is the best on the East Coast.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | April 5, 2004
JUDGING BY RECENT headlines, it's safe to say that the War on Obesity is not going real well so far. Oh, things got off to a rousing start when McDonald's, the Evil Empire of the fast-food industry, announced it was getting rid of its super-size portions. This was considered a good thing, because if we could just get people to stop eating 200 fries at a sitting and washing them down with beach-pail-sized soft drinks, it would surely jump-start the slimming of America. And from there, the thinking went, Burger King and Wendy's and the other chains would follow suit, and then portions of junk food would get smaller and smaller until people kicked the habit altogether and started eating healthy: small garden salad, low-fat yogurt, 20-ounce bottled water.
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