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By Tony Glaros | June 10, 2014
Kingdon Gould, Jr., 90, is a noted businessman, real estate developer and former U.S. ambassador under two presidents. He is a great-grandson of railroad tycoon Jay Gould. Over the course of his more than six decades as a resident of Howard County, Gould's diverse business interests have included partial or complete ownership of the Mayflower Hotel in Washington, D.C., PMI Parking, The Kings Contrivance restaurant in Columbia, and a portion of the Capital Crescent Trail between Georgetown and Silver Spring.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | July 29, 2011
Alger Zapf Jr., former president of the George H. Wahmann Manufacturing Co., died July 22 from complications of Alzheimer's disease at his home in Sarasota, Fla. The former North Baltimore resident was 86. Mr. Zapf was born and raised in Royal Oak, Mich., and graduated in 1942 from Dondero High School. He enlisted in the Army after high school, and part of his military training was at Western Maryland College, now McDaniel College, where he met his future wife, Frances Virginia Wahmann.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | September 30, 2011
Edwin F. "Eddie" Hauser, a decorated World War II veteran who landed at Normandy on D-Day, died Sept. 24 of kidney failure at his Ellicott City home. He was 94. Mr. Hauser was born and raised in Baltimore. His mother was a baker, and his father died when he was 3. After graduating from Polytechnic Institute, he worked at Bethlehem Steel Corp. at Sparrows Point. Mr. Hauser enlisted in the Army in 1941 and served in Europe with the fabled 29th Division. A technical sergeant assigned to an artillery unit, he landed at Omaha Beach on the morning of June 6, 1944, with the 29th Division.
NEWS
December 23, 1994
Fifty years ago tomorrow, Americans were suffering through what was surely the worst American Christmas Eve ever. After six months of military victories in Europe, following the successful invasion on D-Day the previous sixth of June, the momentum and the narrative had changed. The Germans had launched a counter-offensive in the Ardennes forest region of Belgium and Luxembourg on Dec. 16. Greatly out-numbered American soldiers were pushed back. A westward "bulge" in the north-south line of Allied advancement eastward was created that would reach over 50 miles.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | May 26, 2011
Paul J. Wiedorfer, who was Maryland's last surviving World War II recipient of the Congressional Medal of Honor, died Wednesday of heart failure at Loch Raven Community Living and Rehabilitation Center. The former Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. director of safety and training, who lived in Parkville, was 90. Wiedorfer, who was decorated with the nation's highest military honor for bravery, had dashed some 150 yards across a field and singlehandedly knocked out two German machine gun nests during the Battle of the Bulge.
NEWS
By DAN RODRICKS | December 16, 1994
Many years later, when Bill Arrington finally talked about the Battle of the Bulge, he told two stories -- one about the screaming Belgian woman, the other about Christmas Eve in a rancid box car filled with light from the sky.So haunted was he by the woman's screams that he would tell that story only after years of prodding by his son, Jeff, and then he would speak of it only in brief. He more willingly told the second story, writing it down when someone asked him to share a "Christmas memory."
NEWS
March 31, 2012
I find it very hard to believe the hatred of Sgt. Robert Bales in William Smith's recent letter ("Don't pity Sgt. Bales," March 29). Yes, the killing of innocent men, women and children was wrong, and my prayers go out to them. But what about the thousands of innocents who were killed on9/11? What about the thousands of our military service members who have been killed or injured fighting those who would kill us without thinking twice? It takes great strength and conviction to don a uniform in order to protect this country.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,sun reporter | May 16, 2007
William King Pound, a decorated World War II tank commander who fought at the Battle of the Bulge and later established an advertising agency, died of primary lateral sclerosis May 8 at his Catonsville home. He was 82. Born in Baltimore and raised in the Ten Hills neighborhood, Mr. Pound was a 1942 graduate of Mount St. Joseph High School. After briefly attending Loyola College, he enlisted in the Army in 1943. He was a gunner on an M5 light tank assigned to the 4th Armored Division of Gen. George S. Patton Jr.'s 3rd Army when he landed on Utah Beach in June 1944, two weeks after the D-Day Normandy invasion.
EXPLORE
By Lauren Rosenberg, lbrosenberg@patuxent.com | August 16, 2011
As teachers at the Renaissance Institute, retirees Sidney Leibovitz and Gregory Halpin fascinate their adult students with history courses ranging from the Chinese Revolution to French Connections. Their own histories are fascinating, too. Leibovitz's love of history dates to his service in the Army's 99th Infantry Division, where he fought in the Battle of the Bulge. Halpin is also a former longtime director of what is now the Maryland Port Administration - and he's was a radio newscaster in the late 1940s, when television was in its infancy.
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