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NEWS
By TOMAS ALEX TIZON | October 23, 2005
BEND, Ore. -- Half an hour west of this mountain town in central Oregon, in an area covered by forest, is a growing bulge in the terrain that eager scientists say could be the beginnings of a volcano. The bulge covers 100 square miles and is rising at a rate of 1.4 inches a year. The shape resembles a dome, with the highest point about 3 miles west of the South Sister volcano in the Cascade Range. Geologists say the bulge represents a unique opportunity to study what could be a volcanic formation in its earliest stages, but officials in this town of 65,000 worry more about the potential hazards, such as lava and ash or flying rocks.
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NEWS
By Tony Glaros | June 10, 2014
Kingdon Gould, Jr., 90, is a noted businessman, real estate developer and former U.S. ambassador under two presidents. He is a great-grandson of railroad tycoon Jay Gould. Over the course of his more than six decades as a resident of Howard County, Gould's diverse business interests have included partial or complete ownership of the Mayflower Hotel in Washington, D.C., PMI Parking, The Kings Contrivance restaurant in Columbia, and a portion of the Capital Crescent Trail between Georgetown and Silver Spring.
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NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,fred.rasmussen@baltsun.com | November 20, 2008
John Joseph Curry Jr., a retired accountant and World War II veteran who fought at the Battle of the Bulge and later guarded high Nazi officials before the Nuremberg trials, died of heart failure Friday at Oak Crest Village. He was 84. Mr. Curry was born in Baltimore and raised on West Saratoga Street. He was a 1942 graduate of Mount St. Joseph High School in Irvington and attended the Maryland Institute College of Art before being drafted into the Army in 1943. The Army sent Mr. Curry to the University of Oregon in Eugene, where he studied basic engineering, before assigning him to the 11th Armored Division in Europe.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 7, 2014
Richard A. Hartman, former president and CEO of the Automobile Club of Maryland who fought at the Battle of the Bulge, died Feb. 28 of complications from cancer and renal failure at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. The former longtime Cedarcroft resident was 91. "Dick was the most ethical person I have ever known. He did everything that was right, and he demanded that out of the people who worked with him. He was truly a wonderful person," said William U. "Bill" Bass, who succeeded Mr. Hartman as president of the Automobile Club of Maryland when he retired in 1987.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | February 12, 2002
JERUSALEM - In almost any other city, it would be just a wall with a bulge. Almost anywhere else, the wall would be repaired without people taking notice. This wall, however, is part of Jerusalem's most disputed religious site, may be in danger of collapse and has sparked another argument between Palestinians and Israelis. A bulge 35 feet long has appeared in the southern retaining wall built 2,000 years ago during the reign of King Herod at the base of the Temple Mount, known to Muslims as the Noble Sanctuary.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | January 24, 2013
John Morgan "Nemo" Robinson, a retired operator of a Chesapeake Bay summer resort and decorated World War II veteran, died Saturday of a heart attack at Anne Arundel Medical Center after undergoing brain surgery a week earlier. The Severna Park resident was 90. Born and raised in Catonsville, he was a 1938 graduate of Catonsville High School and spent another year at Polytechnic Institute. He gained the nickname Nemo as a child because he had long blond curls like a lion in the "Little Nemo" comic strip.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | March 7, 2014
Richard A. Hartman, former president and CEO of the Automobile Club of Maryland who fought at the Battle of the Bulge, died Feb. 28 of complications from cancer and renal failure at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. The former longtime Cedarcroft resident was 91. "Dick was the most ethical person I have ever known. He did everything that was right, and he demanded that out of the people who worked with him. He was truly a wonderful person," said William U. "Bill" Bass, who succeeded Mr. Hartman as president of the Automobile Club of Maryland when he retired in 1987.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | July 19, 2013
James B. Culp Sr., a retired mechanical engineer and World War II combat veteran who was present for the liberation of the Buchenwald concentration camp, died of congestive heart failure July 13 at his home in the Charlestown Retirement Community. The former Catonsville resident was 92. Born in Baltimore and raised on West Mulberry Street, he was the son of Harry G. Culp, a Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. employee, and Elizabeth Dorsey Culp, a homemaker. Mr. Culp was a 1939 Polytechnic Institute graduate and earned a bachelor's degree at the Maryland Institute College of Art . He joined the Army in 1942 and was assigned to the 6th Armored Division, known as the Fighting Turtles.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 26, 2013
Ralph K. "Ken" Barnes, a retired Koppers Co. manager who was a prisoner of war during the twilight months of World War II, died Saturday from complications of a stroke at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. The longtime Cockeysville resident was 89. The son of farmers, Ralph Kenneth Barnes was born in Gist, in Carroll County, and after his family lost their farm during the Depression, they moved to Waverly. He was a 1941 graduate of Polytechnic Institute, where he was an outstanding baseball pitcher, and later earned a degree from the Johns Hopkins University.
FEATURES
By CARL SCHOETTLER and CARL SCHOETTLER,SUN REPORTER | December 15, 2005
John Trovato is a familiar figure on the benches and in the bars and restaurants of Little Italy, where he likes to end his days with a dram of Grand Marnier and a cappuccino at Da Mimmo. He lives next door, just a half-block from the corner store on High Street where he was born 91 years ago yesterday. He's spent most of his life here in the 200 block of High St., where about 100 years ago, his father, Orazio, an immigrant from Sicily, started the store where Apicella's deli is now. Trovato has hardly ever left Little Italy, or even his block.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | February 27, 2014
Growing up, when Alex Pownall watched his father, he saw a man who loved his job. John Pownall has served 20 years in the military, the last 12 as a recruiter for the Maryland National Guard. He was sent to defend Andrews Air Force Base after the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, and advised the Afghan National Army in 2011 and 2012. "He looked forward to drill, and he came home happy," Alex Pownall said. So when Alex turned 17 last year, he needed no convincing. He joined the Maryland National Guard in October and is waiting to finish high school so he can go to boot camp.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | January 2, 2014
Katherine E. Rafalko, a retired Stella Maris nursing supervisor who had been a World War II Army nurse and treated Battle of the Bulge casualties, died of heart disease Monday at her Timonium home. She was 91. Born Katherine Kinney in Rochester, N.Y., she attended Mercy High School and St. Mary's Hospital School of Nursing, where she earned a diploma in 1943. "She was in her second year of nursing school when Pearl Harbor was attacked. After seeing a movie sponsored by the Red Cross, 'So Proudly We Hail,' she was inspired to volunteer for the U.S. Army Nurse Corps," said her daughter, Virginia Rafalko Canter of Bethesda.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | July 19, 2013
James B. Culp Sr., a retired mechanical engineer and World War II combat veteran who was present for the liberation of the Buchenwald concentration camp, died of congestive heart failure July 13 at his home in the Charlestown Retirement Community. The former Catonsville resident was 92. Born in Baltimore and raised on West Mulberry Street, he was the son of Harry G. Culp, a Baltimore Gas and Electric Co. employee, and Elizabeth Dorsey Culp, a homemaker. Mr. Culp was a 1939 Polytechnic Institute graduate and earned a bachelor's degree at the Maryland Institute College of Art . He joined the Army in 1942 and was assigned to the 6th Armored Division, known as the Fighting Turtles.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | February 26, 2013
Ralph K. "Ken" Barnes, a retired Koppers Co. manager who was a prisoner of war during the twilight months of World War II, died Saturday from complications of a stroke at Gilchrist Hospice Care in Towson. The longtime Cockeysville resident was 89. The son of farmers, Ralph Kenneth Barnes was born in Gist, in Carroll County, and after his family lost their farm during the Depression, they moved to Waverly. He was a 1941 graduate of Polytechnic Institute, where he was an outstanding baseball pitcher, and later earned a degree from the Johns Hopkins University.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | January 24, 2013
John Morgan "Nemo" Robinson, a retired operator of a Chesapeake Bay summer resort and decorated World War II veteran, died Saturday of a heart attack at Anne Arundel Medical Center after undergoing brain surgery a week earlier. The Severna Park resident was 90. Born and raised in Catonsville, he was a 1938 graduate of Catonsville High School and spent another year at Polytechnic Institute. He gained the nickname Nemo as a child because he had long blond curls like a lion in the "Little Nemo" comic strip.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | January 5, 2013
J. Dennis Carper, a Baltimore County marina owner and yacht builder who was a decorated World War II veteran, died of stroke and dementia complications Dec. 25 at his Essex home. He was 91. Born near New Castle, Va., he worked on the family farm at Meadow Creek outside Roanoke. While at a church function, he met Gertrude Esther Hanks, a girl from nearby Covington who was a minister's daughter. They married in 1942. The couple lived in Virginia while he attended a school for aircraft mechanics.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | January 22, 2011
One harsh winter long ago, as he led an encampment of soldiers near a European forest, it never occurred to Alfred H.M. Shehab, then a brash young Army lieutenant, that he and his 30-man unit were a part of military history. "A platoon leader is so busy thinking about what might happen and how to make things go right" that it's hard to grasp much of a broader perspective, says Shehab, a 91-year-old retired lieutenant colonel who lives near Fort Meade. As it was, the 3rd Platoon of B Troop in the 38th Cavalry Reconnaissance Squadron (Mechanized)
NEWS
By Chris Emery and Allison Connolly and Chris Emery and Allison Connolly,Sun reporters | February 25, 2008
Norbert L. Grunwald, an Austrian-born U.S. Army veteran who was taken prisoner by the Nazis during the Battle of the Bulge and later worked in American intelligence and for a brokerage in Baltimore, died of complications of prostate cancer Friday at his Baltimore home. He was 83 years old. Mr. Grunwald was born in Vienna, Austria. When he was 13, Nazi forces took over his country, and he fled alone and on foot to Poland. On the first night of his journey he was picked up by the Nazis, said his wife, Louise.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | September 10, 2012
It's a common refrain in Gia D'Anna's office: Extra inches that childbirth or time left around the middle are resisting diet and exercise. D'Anna is the office manager for a Lutherville plastic surgeon, and, as a mother, she sympathizes with the patients. She just got her own flat tummy back last year. Her boss, Dr. Ronald H. Schuster, had bought a machine that aimed to zap muffin tops and love handles via low temperatures. He was looking for volunteers on the staff before he rolled out the service to patients.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2012
James F. Barlow, a retired masonry contractor who drove a weapon carrier at Omaha Beach during the World War II Allied invasion, died Sept. 1 at St. Agnes Medical Center after suffering a fractured hip at his Academy Heights home. He was 87. Mr. Barlow was co-grand marshal of this year's Catonsville July 4th parade and was the commander of two veterans posts. He also led the parade in 1994 for the 50th anniversary of D-Day. Born in Baltimore and raised near Union Square, he attended 14 Holy Martyrs School and was a 1942 graduate of St. Martin's High School, where he was the center on the school's basketball team.
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