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NEWS
December 3, 1990
Bulgarians are finally shaking off rule by Communists. Last spring, after 45 years of communism, they did not realize they could. But the resignation of Prime Minister Andrei Lukanov in favor of a national coalition caretaker regime guarantees it. The people freely voted-in the Communists, renamed as Socialists, in June. But they voted anti-Communist with their feet in the general strike that has brought down the regime. A new election next spring is promised.What just happened was a relatively benign revolution.
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NEWS
August 4, 2012
The drumbeat for war with Iran is getting scarier and scarier ("No good options for Iran," Aug. 2). The situation has escalated now that Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu has concluded that the recent suicide attack that killed five Israelis in Bulgaria was the doing of Hezbollah, backed by Iran. If Mr. Netanyahu has any evidence to that effect, he is not forthcoming with it. Boyko Borisov, Bulgaria's prime minister, doesn't know the identity of the killer or who was behind this bloody handiwork.
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NEWS
By Georgie Anne Geyer | October 27, 1992
SOFIA, Bulgaria -- WHEN analysts and diplomats point with horror to the expanded war that could come next in the Balkans, they always point first to this little country that was for centuries the wellspring of the Balkan wars.Only recently, and still imperfectly, "de-communized," Bulgaria could easily divert the people's attention to nationalism today by asserting historic claims to Macedonia, which has declared independence from Yugoslavia but which has not yet been recognized by most of the world.
SPORTS
By Diane Pucin and Diane Pucin,Tribune Newspapers | September 2, 2009
NEW YORK - - Maria Sharapova came armed with her nerve and her serve Tuesday night at Arthur Ashe Stadium. Dressed asymmetrically in gauzy black, gray and white, and showing no evidence of an uncertain serve that has plagued her this summer, Sharapova dispatched Bulgaria's Tsvetana Pironkova, 6-3, 6-0, in 73 minutes. Because Sharapova missed the first five months of this season while recovering from shoulder surgery last fall, the 22-year-old Russian is seeded only 29th. It is an unaccustomed place in the draw for Sharapova, who was once ranked No. 1. Sharapova said she was particularly happy with how she attacked the match by moving forward.
NEWS
By CARL SCHOETTLER | July 31, 1994
Sofia, Bulgaria. -- If the United Colors of Bennetton, Kentucky Fried Chicken and Honda have all reached Bulgaria, can McDonald's be far behind?"No," says Brad Trask, a McDonald's media spokesman. "We plan to open in Sofia by the end of the year."In post-Communist Bulgaria, the avant garde of free enterprise appears as fast food, fast cars and colorful clothes.And in this country where the collapse of communism meant the wilting of industrial production, money changers, those inevitable pioneers of the free market, abound as in the Temple at Jerusalem.
SPORTS
By JOHN EISENBERG | July 11, 1994
EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. -- If you can locate Bulgaria on a map, raise your hand.C'mon, be honest. Your social studies teacher isn't watching.No, I didn't think you could.OK, let's try again. Can you name the monetary unit of Bulgaria? The largest city? The form of government? The national food and drink?Helloooo, anyone out there?Can you name a Bulgarian athlete who has made a major mark on the global stage?Sorry, Nadia Comaneci was Romanian. Good try, though.OK, one more question: How much sense does it make that Germany, Argentina, England, France, the Netherlands, Ireland and 158 other soccer-playing countries no longer have a chance to win the 1994 World Cup, but Bulgaria, which had never won a Cup game until two weeks ago, is one of the four that still can win?
TRAVEL
By Tim Jones and Tim Jones,Chicago Tribune | July 13, 2008
VELIKO TURNOVO, Bulgaria - Up and down the twisting, cobblestone streets of this charming ancient city, hundreds of photocopied leaflets with grainy black-and-white images of the dead are tacked onto trees, utility poles and the sides of buildings. Most of these people are long dead. Some passed on more than a dozen years ago, yet relatives in this so-called "city of the czars" and other towns across Bulgaria keep the crinkled, yellowing death notices on public display, as if to remind friends and neighbors not to forget the people.
NEWS
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,Sun Staff Correspondent | July 30, 1994
SOFIA, Bulgaria -- The frail and aged cantor leads the Sabbath service in the last Bulgarian synagogue in the rhythms and accents of the Jews expelled from medieval Spain.Haim Meshullam is 87 years old and the last cantor in Bulgaria. His voice is strong and firm but has a faint quaver. He stands erect on the bimah, the dais before the lectern, an unwavering figure enrobed in black. He wears a cantorial headdress that rests like a great black dome on his head."Then were finished the heavens and earth and all their host," he chants in Sephardic Hebrew.
SPORTS
By Brad Snyder and Brad Snyder,Sun Staff Writer | July 14, 1994
EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. -- After a fast and furious first half, Italy's Roberto Baggio and Bulgaria's Hristo Stoitchkov sat out much of the anticlimactic second stanza.But Baggio's two first-half goals did enough early damage to give Italy a 2-1 semifinal victory over upstart Bulgaria before an almost entirely pro-Italian crowd of 77,094, the largest of the seven World Cup games at Giants Stadium.Italy moved into Sunday's final against Brazil, with the champion assured of securing a record-breaking fourth World Cup. Italy will be making its fifth appearance in the final, suffering its lone loss in the 1970 final to a Pele-led Brazil.
SPORTS
By Bill Plaschke and Bill Plaschke,Los Angeles Times | July 13, 1994
EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. -- The Italians realize it is no longer luck.Forget the short-handed victory over Norway, the last-minute escapes against Nigeria and Spain.When Roberto Baggio performed his goal-celebrating somersault Saturday and landed on his feet, they knew."We now feel we have a duty to take this thing all the way to the end," said Italy's goalkeeper, Gianluca Pagliuca.But look what just wandered into their path for today's World Cup semifinal at Giants Stadium.What did they say their name was?
TRAVEL
By Carol Pucci and Carol Pucci,McClatchy-Tribune | June 14, 2009
Question: : What destinations are you seeing as the emerging "new Prague" as we come into a new economic climate for travel? Any new cities in Eastern Europe, or perhaps Southeast Asia that are on your radar as the "next place to be"? Answer: : Prague, as beautiful and interesting a city as it is, has become crowded and expensive compared to other Central and Eastern European cities. I wouldn't skip it, but I'd also spend time visiting some other cities in the Czech Republic, such as Cesky Krumlov and Budejovice.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,liz.bowie@baltsun.com | May 25, 2009
When James De Vinne was in nursery school, he became interested in all the flags of the world. Then came a fascination with skyscrapers from cities as far away as Dubai. In elementary school, that passion for learning about countries was cemented through a geography club. This year, the Dumbarton Middle School sixth-grader beat out middle school students from across the state to represent Maryland in the National Geographic Bee held last week in Washington. James got six out of nine questions right, making it to the top 20 of the 55 entrants but not to the final group of 10 participants.
TRAVEL
By Tim Jones and Tim Jones,Chicago Tribune | July 13, 2008
VELIKO TURNOVO, Bulgaria - Up and down the twisting, cobblestone streets of this charming ancient city, hundreds of photocopied leaflets with grainy black-and-white images of the dead are tacked onto trees, utility poles and the sides of buildings. Most of these people are long dead. Some passed on more than a dozen years ago, yet relatives in this so-called "city of the czars" and other towns across Bulgaria keep the crinkled, yellowing death notices on public display, as if to remind friends and neighbors not to forget the people.
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | June 29, 2008
News item: Trade rumors continue to swirl around Cleveland Indians pitcher C.C. Sabathia, though general manager Mark Shapiro insists that he wants to re-sign the club's veteran ace. My take: It's OK for Orioles fans to dream, but Sabathia probably isn't going to be wearing Baltimore on his road jersey next year. News item: Big Brown trainer Rick Dutrow, who already had a checkered past, was suspended recently by Kentucky racing officials after one of his other horses tested positive for an excessive amount of Clenbuterol.
SPORTS
By Candus Thomson and Candus Thomson,Sun Reporter | January 11, 2007
World champion figure skater Kimmie Meissner will skate an exhibition at the University of Delaware on Sunday - not Saturday, as previously reported - as part of a send-off show for athletes competing at U.S. Nationals. Meissner, 17, of Bel Air, who was the runner-up at nationals last year and finished sixth at the Olympics, will perform to "Keep Holding On" from the soundtrack of Eragon. The show also will include appearances by U.S. ice dance silver medalists Melissa Gregory and Denis Petukhov and 2006 Junior World bronze medalist Christine Zukowski.
SPORTS
By CANDUS THOMSON | January 9, 2007
World champion figure skater Kimmie Meissner will skate an exhibition Saturday at the University of Delaware as part of a send-off show for athletes competing at U.S. Nationals. The Bel Air teen, the runner-up at Nationals last year who finished sixth at the Olympics, will perform to "Keep Holding On" from the soundtrack of Eragon. The show also will include appearances by U.S. ice dance silver medalists Melissa Gregory and Denis Petukhov and 2006 Junior World bronze medalist Christine Zukowski.
NEWS
By Dusko Doder and Dusko Doder,Sun Contributing Writer | December 8, 1994
SOFIA, Bulgaria -- The car of the Japanese ambassador was stolen while he walked from the car to his residence. Thieves hijacked the car of the papal nuncio on a busy highway, leaving the nuncio on the side of the road as they drove away.So pervasive is crime in Bulgaria that the former government minister responsible for the police has suggested that citizens acquire guns."It is better for ordinary citizens to have a gun to protect themselves," said Viktor Mihailov, the former interior minister, "since the state cannot fully defend them."
BUSINESS
By Lester A. Picker | October 25, 1993
We may have all felt it, but my colleague Richard Cook said it best. "Participatory democracy starts with each one of us as an ** individual. Each of us has to want to change something and at the same time feel capable of doing it. And, the change has to be for us, not just for me."What Cook, a former Peace Corps volunteer, was referring to was our individual views of the democratic process. As trainers for the emerging nonprofit sector in Eastern Europe -- in this case Bulgaria -- we each had an opportunity to reflect on the role of non-profits in a democracy.
NEWS
By PAUL RICHTER and PAUL RICHTER,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 28, 2006
SOFIA, Bulgaria -- On the eve of a United Nations deadline for Iran to halt uranium enrichment, Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice called yesterday for diplomatic action against Tehran, warning that the Security Council cannot permit the regime to "simply ignore its will and its word." Rice, appearing at a NATO meeting, said it was "pretty clear" that Iran will ignore the deadline set for today by the U.N. nuclear watchdog agency for a halt to enrichment. When the International Atomic Energy Agency reports this failure, she said, the Security Council must ask itself whether it will remain credible if it allows Iran to "simply flout the will of the international community" without penalty.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 28, 2005
WASHINGTON -- The U.S.-led international military coalition in Iraq shrank further yesterday after Bulgaria and Ukraine completed troop withdrawals and Poland announced it was reducing its contingent by 40 percent and switching to a non-combat role. Responding to appeals from U.S. officials, the Polish government reversed an earlier plan to remove all troops by the end of this year. But Polish officials said the 900 remaining soldiers of its 1,500-troop force will focus almost exclusively on training Iraqis while they wind down their mission over the course of 2006.
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