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NEWS
March 9, 2011
In your article regarding light bulbs, ("Law shedding light on bulbs," March 6), many drawbacks to energy-efficient alternatives were listed, but nowhere did it mention that fluorescent lights, compact or tubes, can cause damage to wood furniture, upholstery fabric, draperies, photographs, etc. Our experience has been that they do the same damage as if these items were set outside in direct sunlight. Also, now we have to waste time and gas to take the bulbs to be recycled. What is the ratio of emissions produced by our car to return the bulbs in relation to the emissions saved by the CFL using less electricity?
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FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali, For The Baltimore Sun | September 3, 2014
I'm tired of planting tulip bulbs for voles to eat. What bulbs won't they eat? Squirrels, voles and chipmunks can all be the bane of bulb gardeners, but there are lots of rodent-proof choices - including daffodils, which now come in shades from pink to white with orange highlights, as well as many fascinating forms and fragrances. Other options include hyacinths (Hyacinthus orientalis), grape hyacinth (Muscari spp.), ornamental alliums, snowdrop (Galanthus spp.), summer snowflake (Leucojum spp.)
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NEWS
February 25, 2011
The article "Mercury Ban Puts Freezer on Thermometers" (Feb. 23) includes a listing of other devices containing the substance. But there's a significant omission — the newer lightbulbs coming in as incandescent ones are phased out. The whole situation is absurd. Officials crack down on older thermometers, yet have no problem with forcing CFL bulbs on people, even though they pose a danger if they break or are not discarded of properly. What's more, these mercury retainers are hardly "light bulbs" since they offer virtually no illumination.
NEWS
July 9, 2014
Regarding your recent editorial on Howard County's effort to limit sales of unhealthy foods at county-sponsored events or venues, it's quite apparent that you do not understand our fundamental rights under the Constitution ( "Fireworks in Howard County," July 7). Our Founding Fathers declared independence from tyranny. Might I suggest watching the John Adams series on HBO? It's very educational. The president's ridiculous "executive orders" are simply the government acting as a dictatorship.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer On Gardening | December 3, 2009
I am not sure whether it's gardeners anxious to extend the growing season - or those who market to gardeners - but paperwhite and amaryllis bulb kits are stacked for sale like fruitcakes at this time of year. These are the bulbs that can be "forced" to bloom out of season without the months-long hibernation required by tulips, hyacinths and their kin, and they provide a welcome alternative to the ubiquitous poinsettia. According to the National Garden Association, 4.9 million households purchased bulbs for forcing last year - up from 4.1 million in 2007.
FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali, Special to The Baltimore Sun | January 18, 2012
Should I put dead leaves over the flower bulbs in my yard that are already coming up? Our extremely mild winter has encouraged many plants to flower and leaf unseasonably early. The tips of bulb foliage may yellow a bit, but your spring flower display should be all right. Early spring bulbs and other flowers, such as helleborus, often peek through snow. That said, it wouldn't hurt to cover the bulbs lightly with leaves to moderate temperature swings. What wild animals live in Maryland?
FEATURES
November 1, 1998
Q. Should I fertilize my bulbs when I plant them? Is bone meal really the best thing for them?A.Bone meal is a good source of phosphorus, but bulbs are like all other plants in that they require nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium for good growth. Broadcast and incorporate a balanced fertilizer according to label instructions before planting, broadcast the fertilizer on top of the soil after planting. You can reduce amount of fertilizer if you incorporate compost into the bed.Q.A neighbor gave me some lemon grass and rosemary plants from her herb garden.
NEWS
May 8, 2013
My husband and I recycle everything possible. We use cloth bags rather than paper or plastic, we are organ donors, we compost our kitchen scraps, and we even take The Sun online rather than waste paper ("Don't save the planet" May 3). But we do not - will not - use "screwy" light bulbs. By the government's own admission, they are a severe biohazard if they are broken. That alone ought to give any sensible person reason to question them. They cannot be used in three-way lights, or with a dimmer switch.
FEATURES
By MIKE KLINGAMAN | September 25, 1994
How bright are flower bulbs? Let's find out.Last week, I bought some spring-flowering bulbs and planted them at crazy angles. On purpose. I scooped out some dirt and stuck them in the ground, every which way but up. Some of these bulbs are now lying down. Others are pointed toward Asia. None are planted correctly.Why would I goof up my garden?I want to know if the bulbs are smarter than me.Can tulips survive when planted on their sides? Will daffodils turn themselves around when planted upside down?
FEATURES
By Susan McGrath and Susan McGrath,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | December 12, 1990
Hit the switch. A pause. A hum . . . a flicker . . . then an explosion of eerie white light that casts a greenish pallor on all within its range.No. It's not a description of the detonation of the first atomic bomb. It's just a description of what most people expect when they switch on a fluorescent light.You are familiar with fluorescents, I'm sure: long skinny tubes that fit into inverted trays on the ceilings of schools, office buildings and even department store dressing rooms (where only the stout of heart dare try on a swimsuit under their relentless cool glare)
BUSINESS
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | December 28, 2013
Nanotechnology developed in Baltimore could help brighten household LED light bulbs or touch screens in the new year as startup Pixelligent prepares to ramp up manufacturing. The Dundalk-based company is searching the region for space for a manufacturing facility capable of increasing its capacity to make nanocrystal coatings for electronics and semiconductors by 10 times or more. It has been making small quantities of the products at its Holabird Business Park offices since moving from College Park in 2011 but foresees demand growing dramatically next year as devices that use the nanocrystals make it into consumers' hands for the first time.
NEWS
May 8, 2013
My husband and I recycle everything possible. We use cloth bags rather than paper or plastic, we are organ donors, we compost our kitchen scraps, and we even take The Sun online rather than waste paper ("Don't save the planet" May 3). But we do not - will not - use "screwy" light bulbs. By the government's own admission, they are a severe biohazard if they are broken. That alone ought to give any sensible person reason to question them. They cannot be used in three-way lights, or with a dimmer switch.
NEWS
May 8, 2013
I had to respond to Peter Jensen 's vituperative diatribe "Don't Save the Planet" about conservatives supposedly going out of their way to avoid protecting the planet (May 3). Since when did a question limited to specially marked light bulbs measure anyone's environmental consciousness? Based on our voting record, I guess you could label us conservatives. Like most people I know, we use both tubular and CFL fluorescent bulbs (where practical - show me one that works in freezers, variable intensity lamps, outdoor flood lights, desk lamps that take small bulbs, garage trouble light, etc.)
NEWS
May 3, 2013
To the age-old question of how many conservatives does it take to screw in a light bulb, we now have a definitive answer: Just one, but it will take him weeks to chase down a vintage incandescent bulb because he won't touch an energy-efficient one. At least that's the obvious conclusion to draw from a new study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. The study, put together by researchers from Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania and Duke University's Fuqua School of Business, asked hundreds of people to pass judgment on light bulb options.
FEATURES
By Ellen Nibali, Special to The Baltimore Sun | January 18, 2012
Should I put dead leaves over the flower bulbs in my yard that are already coming up? Our extremely mild winter has encouraged many plants to flower and leaf unseasonably early. The tips of bulb foliage may yellow a bit, but your spring flower display should be all right. Early spring bulbs and other flowers, such as helleborus, often peek through snow. That said, it wouldn't hurt to cover the bulbs lightly with leaves to moderate temperature swings. What wild animals live in Maryland?
NEWS
By Ellen Nibali, Special to The Baltimore Sun | December 13, 2011
Moths have ruined all the wool clothes in my closet. They aren't the kind that fly around lights at night. They're tiny, and sometimes I only see larvae. I used a trap, which killed some. I also tried cedar balls, blocks and hangers. I bought a bomb, too, but it's so toxic I'm afraid to use it. I saw a commercial for something that plugs into an outlet and sends out a frequency to drive them away. What should I do next? Using mothballs and cedar are preventive measures against clothes moths.
NEWS
By Cindy Parr and Cindy Parr,Contributing writer | November 3, 1991
Energy-saving light bulbs were the last thing Janet Lemmon thought she would get when she applied to participate in the county's weatherization program.The 50-year-old Westminster resident said she found out shortly after she moved into her house on Aug. 1 that the uninsulated windows would let in a draft in winter."I was on the list to have storm windows replaced," she said. "But when they called and asked if I would be willing to try these lights, I said I would."Lemmon lives in one of 10 Carroll homes that will use a new fluorescent bulb the next six months as part of a pilotenergy-conservation program offered by the county Bureau of Housing and Development in cooperation with the State Energy Administration and the State Weatherization Office.
NEWS
By Ed McDonough and Ed McDonough,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 18, 1997
TWO WORDS CAN turn me from jolly to Scrooge-like in the blink of a bulb -- miniature lights.I hate dealing with those confounded devices. It started with an aunt with an upside-down tree (that's a story for another column), and then through eight years of marriage.While I certainly wasn't happy about the end of the marriage, it has one benefit -- I've all but eliminated those pesky little lights from the household holiday scene.I've always been a fan of the larger, screw-in bulbs. It's easier to replace bulbs and the wiring lasts longer.
NEWS
by Carson Porter | August 12, 2011
This looks like a fun little party trick. Or maybe it just caught my eye because I went to an awesome black light party a few weeks ago. Either way for $12 it's worth a look.
NEWS
July 12, 2011
"We are taking away a choice that continues to let people waste their own money. " With that comment, Energy Secretary Steven Chu demonstrates his elitist arrogance concerning the pending Energy Independence and Security Act's incandescent light bulb ban. Citizens should take great exception to the nanny state telling us what to do with our own money. If the cost-savings of new-tech lights are real, the market will move to them with no interference from the government. This however, is another "we know best" strong-arm attempt to dictate personal choices.
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