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By Davin Hong | July 18, 2013
The $1.2 billion approved by the Maryland General Assembly for city school construction is a historic opportunity for transformation in Baltimore. But if, after 10 years, the outcome is just new schools, we will have missed a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to affect not only schools but entire neighborhoods. As an architect, I believe in the value of good facilities and their ability to create healthy environments that promote learning. But better buildings alone are not enough to restore communities.
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NEWS
Tim Wheeler and Michael Dresser | January 14, 2014
Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz joined his counterparts from Montgomery and Prince George's counties in Annapolis Tuesday to appeal for more state funding for school construction, saying they need help coping with rising enrollments. Speaking for all three, Kamenetz warned that whatever success Maryland has had in providing quality education to the state's students is in jeopardy unless the state's most populous counties can expand and upgrade their aging, crowded schools.
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NEWS
By Lan Nguyen and Lan Nguyen,Staff Writer | January 28, 1993
County and school officials appealed to the state Board of Public Works yesterday for more money to build schools, after being given only $2.2 million of the $37 million they had requested.Superintendent Michael E. Hickey, along with County Executive Charles I. Ecker and school board Chairman Dana Hanna, asked for more money to help pay for the new western high school and three new elementary school projects.The money Howard County was awarded this year is about $4 million less than they received last year.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | August 26, 2013
When Baltimore school officials lobbied state lawmakers to fund an ambitious $1 billion, 10-year plan this year to modernize facilities, no one understood having a decade-long vision more than Sen. Catherine Pugh. It was about 10 years ago that Pugh felt a spark on a New York City street corner as she watched the hustle and bustle of students heading into the High School of Fashion Industries. But when she spoke of replicating such a school in Baltimore, her idea was met with veiled skepticism.
NEWS
By Erik Nelson and Erik Nelson,Staff writer | September 25, 1991
County schools, which have enjoyed steadfast financing for school construction over the last six years, could face delays in building because of state and county economic crunches.School Superintendent Michael E. Hickey proposed yesterday a $40.7 million 1993 capital budget, which includes building a middle school and elementary school toopen in summer 1993 and a high school and elementary school to open in summer 1994. The plan depends on $21.4 million from the county and$16 million from the state.
NEWS
The Baltimore Sun | November 8, 2011
Polls open 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. Polling places : Nearly 300 around city. For detailed information, contact the Board of Elections online or (410) 396-5550 Races : Mayor, Comptroller, City Council President, City Council members Other votes : Charter amendments to put aside money for repairing and building schools, and to lower the age for serving on the City Council from 21 to 18.
NEWS
October 23, 2006
Could last week's announcement by Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. that he'll commit at least $338 million to school construction next year have anything to do with the upcoming election? The total is the same as Mr. Ehrlich put in his budget for the current fiscal year, but, arguably, if he wants to stay in office, a maintenance of effort for something that affects a lot of voters, such as school buildings, is the least he could do. And big money for building schools is necessary now because Mr. Ehrlich was so stingy when he first took office.
NEWS
September 6, 1993
Year-round schools could probably save money, but don't appear to be worth the trouble. There are no clear educational benefits. Before Maryland tries a year-round calendar -- as Gov. William Donald Schaefer has urged -- costs and benefits need to be weighed much more carefully.Experts say it takes 18 months to talk through a year-round calendar with the community and develop a plan for smooth implementation. The impatient governor's desire to start an experiment before he leaves office is a recipe for failure.
NEWS
By M. WILLIAM SALGANIK | May 28, 1994
In budgeting, everything is a trade-off. Hire more police or buy new fire equipment. Hold down tuition at public colleges or give professors a raise. Build a space station or enlarge Head Start. Maryland may be seeing the beginnings of an unusual budget trade-off: building schools over running schools.The state pays about 40 percent of the cost of operating public elementary and secondary schools, with local governments paying most of the rest. For years, there has been concern over the disparity between rich and poor school districts.
NEWS
By Kris Antonelli and Kris Antonelli,SUN STAFF | April 5, 1998
So why must Anne Arundel County spend $14.4 million to build a new Davidsonville Elementary School, when other counties are building schools for about half the price?Some of the extra cost is in the site.Building the 600-student school at Central Avenue and Queen Anne Bridge Road would require major road improvements to allow separate bus and car lanes as well as a traffic signal. Total cost: $200,000.Because public water is not available, the builder would have to dig a well and install water treatment, septic and underground sprinkler systems.
NEWS
By Davin Hong | July 18, 2013
The $1.2 billion approved by the Maryland General Assembly for city school construction is a historic opportunity for transformation in Baltimore. But if, after 10 years, the outcome is just new schools, we will have missed a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to affect not only schools but entire neighborhoods. As an architect, I believe in the value of good facilities and their ability to create healthy environments that promote learning. But better buildings alone are not enough to restore communities.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich, The Baltimore Sun | December 19, 2012
The state has reversed the Baltimore County school board's decision to build a 700-student elementary school at Mays Chapel Park because it did not give proper notice of a public hearing. In a legal opinion released this week, the state school board said local officials must schedule a new hearing and properly publicize it to correct the mistake. "We find that the local board violated the notice requirements of [state law] because it failed to publish notice of the March 19, 2012 site selection hearing at least once in a newspaper of general circulation in Baltimore County," the state board wrote.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | October 17, 2012
When developers promised to build a $38 million, 700-seat elementary school in Odenton, Anne Arundel County officials embraced the proposal as a way to ease overcrowding in other area schools. They even tentatively gave the school a name: Evergreen Elementary. But plans for the school have met an obstacle. The Forks of the Patuxent, the community in which the proposed development is located, refuses to lift a covenant that the land be reserved for adult communities. Forks resident Patrick Padilla, 42, said residents who declined to lift the covenant requiring 55-and-older properties were concerned that a new housing development around the school would generate more traffic and crime without the age restriction.
NEWS
Liz Bowie | April 11, 2012
In a meeting with the editorial board of The Baltimore Sun , the next Baltimore County schools chief, S. Dallas Dance, said he supports the controversial decision to build a new school in Mays Chapel. The school, he said, is needed to relieve overcrowding.  He said he will never shy away from making unpopular decisions, but that no matter how difficult the decision "it does not give you the right not to listen to people. "   Dance will take over on July 1, but he plans to visit the county several times between now and then.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2012
For the second time in four years, there's a fight brewing in northern Baltimore County that raises questions about the scarcity of county-owned land for parks and schools. The school system is poised to approve building an elementary school on land it has owned for decades in Mays Chapel, currently the site of a park. But residents in the community, largely made up of retirees, say they don't want to give up the green, open space near their residences. With trailers lined up outside elementary schools in the area and enrollment projected to continue growing in the next five years, the system needs to build a school that can accommodate 700 students.
NEWS
The Baltimore Sun | November 8, 2011
Polls open 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. Polling places : Nearly 300 around city. For detailed information, contact the Board of Elections online or (410) 396-5550 Races : Mayor, Comptroller, City Council President, City Council members Other votes : Charter amendments to put aside money for repairing and building schools, and to lower the age for serving on the City Council from 21 to 18.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | April 7, 1996
When local homebuilders said last week that they would consider building schools to help offset the effect of development, people listened.County Commissioners have grappled for years with the problem of school crowding, but the issue has come to a head as the county faces a $5 million budget deficit and a rapidly growing school population, driven by residential development.But don't expect a magic bullet.Local homebuilders say they want to share their expertise, not their money. Among their suggestions: adding modular units to schools, which can be done within months with no heavy construction on site.
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | April 7, 2011
Anne Arundel County Council members have received a copy of the lease agreement between the Imagine Global Village Academy and the developer who is offering to build a school in exchange for zoning approval to build a 1,000-home development in Laurel, ending a potential standoff between the developer who balked at providing it and the council member representing the area. The council started to review the Severna Park-based Polm Cos.' thick document last week. The proposed RiverWood project and K-8 school — a public school that would alleviate crowding and be privately operated — are included in the comprehensive zoning bill pending before the council.
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