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NEWS
By STACY KAPER and STACY KAPER,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 6, 2005
Some farmers scale back visitors as required agricultural building permits debated Fall harvest season has drawn children on school field trips to farms in Harford County for decades. In the 1950s, the advent of milk parlors - a labor-saving method where cows come to a central place to be fed and milked - led to school groups flocking to dairy farms, recalls Gene Umbarger, who has spent most of his life as a dairy farmer. "Farmers are sort of unique since there are fewer of us now. It tends to generate some interest," said Umbarger, who hosted school trips over the years at his Woolsey Farm in Churchville, where he now raises sheep and grows hay, straw and grains.
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NEWS
By Larry Carson | larry.carson@baltsun.com | January 31, 2010
An increase in the number of building permits issued last year is giving Howard County officials hope that the economy will improve, even as they consider the first year-to-year drop in the number of jobs in the county in three decades. The key indicators, presented Thursday morning at a citizens committee meeting on government spending, show both the depth of the recession and the hope that it might be starting to fade. The jump from 1,066 residential building permits issued in 2008 - the lowest number in more than 30 years - to 1,480 last year signals that a recovery may be coming, said county planning research director Jeff Bronow.
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NEWS
By Frank Lynch and Frank Lynch,Staff Writer | June 13, 1993
Although a late spring buying season stimulated the rea estate market, the number of building permits issued for Harford County homes continued to drop.County officials issued 124 permits last month for the construction of single homes, townhouses, condominiums, apartments and mobile homes. That is 116 fewer than in May 1992.The total of 608 for the year to date represents a drop of 30 percent from the 1992 figure of 863 and a 40 percent dip from the 997 permits issued as of May 1991.There is no significant change in the number of commercial and industrial building permits issued.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,mary.gail.hare@baltsun.com | August 20, 2009
After years of delays in getting Fort Howard redeveloped as a retirement community for veterans, the Department of Veterans Affairs on Wednesday scrapped those plans and said it will seek a new partner for the project. Fort Howard Senior Housing Association had signed a 75-year lease with the VA in 2004 to build what would have been the nation's largest continuing-care community for veterans. But the project, Bayside at Fort Howard, had become enmeshed in disputes over building permits, zoning regulations and taxes.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney | March 10, 1991
In January, residential building permits in metropolitan Baltimore fell to their lowest level since the recession year of 1982, according to a report by the Baltimore Regional Council of Governments.Building permits for single-family homes fell 34 percent, the council reported.The number of permits for apartment and condominium construction fell even more -- by 98 percent. But the council said that dip was a statistical blip because an exceptionally high number of those permits were issued in January 1990.
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,Staff Writer | December 29, 1992
About 3,000 Howard County building permits will expire jTC Thursday because the work was either never done or never inspected.Most of the permits have been sitting around for years, says David M. Hammerman, director of the Department of Licenses, Inspections, and Permits.Holders of old permits can keep them active by asking for an inspection or seeking an extension before the Thursday deadline, Mr. Hammerman said.County Auditor Ronald S. Weinstein had recommended the mass cancellation after discovering that the work authorized in 3,003 building permits had not been inspected within the past six months.
NEWS
By Steven Stanek and Steven Stanek,Sun Reporter | June 25, 2008
A panel investigating erroneously issued building permits is expected to release its findings to Anne Arundel County Executive John R. Leopold today, including a recommendation that applicants bear more responsibility for ensuring their project proposals are clear. The Task Force for the Study of Erroneous Permit Approvals also asks Leopold to require applicants with revisions to submit original and changed drawings of their project, go through a second review by zoning officials and get a signature from the contractor.
NEWS
By Joe Mathews and Joe Mathews,Sun Staff Writer | July 15, 1994
A proposed moratorium on building permits in Manchester, suggested by a council member as a way to combat a current water shortage, would do little to ease water problems there, officials from around the county say.At a Manchester Town Council meeting Tuesday night, Christopher D'Amario suggested the moratorium, which would effectively halt development in the town at least until the current ban on outdoor use of water can be lifted."
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN STAFF | May 21, 2002
Fearing that the Carroll commissioners soon might impose stricter growth limits, developers have been bombarding the county's offices with requests for building permits to secure their rights under current law. The permit rush followed a meeting last week at which county staffers told the commissioners that projected growth will far exceed the goal of 6,000 new houses in six years set by the county in 1997. Faced with the news, the board has discussed ways to change the 6,000-home limit from a goal to a rule but is not close to approving new policies.
NEWS
By Michael J. Clark and Michael J. Clark,Howard County Bureau of The Sun | January 23, 1991
The Howard County Council voted 4-1 early today to lift immediately a controversial cap on new home building permits and to wipe out a permit allocation system that builders had charged resulted in the hoarding of permits.In a separate 4-1 vote, the council defeated a bill that would have extended the cap on new housing permits through Sept. 15.The 18-month cap was to have expired March 15.Council Chairman C. Vernon Gray's bill lifting the cap extends until Oct. 31 bans on subdivision rezoning and on new subdivisions in western Howard County.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,mary.gail.hare@baltsun.com | August 3, 2009
To clarify residential construction standards, prevent unnecessary disturbance of land and ease the present financial burden on the beleaguered housing industry, the Baltimore County Council is considering a bill that would make a building permit viable for nine years. If the landowner has not invested money in the property within that time frame, the permit becomes void and the project would have to go through the building review process again. The bill, which the council is to consider Monday, would eliminate the "forever" status for an approved development plan in which the property owner has invested even minimally within four years of receiving a permit.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,larry.carson@baltsun.com | February 22, 2009
Howard County issued its fewest number of building permits last year since officials began collecting data three decades ago, according to new figures that planners say don't include the steepest part of the recession. In an annual development report, planning director Marsha S. McLaughlin said 1,157 building permits were issued during the year that ended Sept. 30, down from 1,899 the year before - a 39 percent decline. "This is the smallest annual amount since 1979, the earliest year for which the Department of Planning and Zoning has permit data," McLaughlin wrote in the report, noting that development is expected to drop even more next year.
NEWS
By Steven Stanek and Steven Stanek,Sun Reporter | June 25, 2008
A panel investigating erroneously issued building permits is expected to release its findings to Anne Arundel County Executive John R. Leopold today, including a recommendation that applicants bear more responsibility for ensuring their project proposals are clear. The Task Force for the Study of Erroneous Permit Approvals also asks Leopold to require applicants with revisions to submit original and changed drawings of their project, go through a second review by zoning officials and get a signature from the contractor.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN REPORTER | June 10, 2007
A Florida developer intends to build the contested 23-story condominium tower in Columbia's Town Center, according to a top official of the firm. William Rowe, vice president of WCI Communities, would not predict when construction might begin, but after watching the Howard County Planning Board decisively turn back two zoning amendments Thursday night that might have blocked the project, he vowed that the building would go up. "We ultimately are going...
NEWS
By Laura McCandlish and Laura McCandlish,[Sun Reporter] | January 7, 2007
The water crisis affecting Westminster and much of Carroll County goes beyond the concerns of pumping water from well to tap and could drastically alter growth plans in the county for decades to come, according to local officials and water experts. To brainstorm solutions to water deficits and the new state requirement that a water system meet its demand during the worst droughts on record, officials from Carroll's eight municipalities will gather for a countywide water summit Feb. 3. If the Maryland Department of the Environment continues to enforce water restrictions in those municipalities, that could undermine overall county efforts to contain sprawl, said Jesse Richardson Jr., an expert in water-rights law at Virginia Tech.
NEWS
By GERALD P. MERRELL and GERALD P. MERRELL,SUN REPORTER | August 11, 2006
Even as the green light nears for construction of a planned residential and retail tower in downtown Columbia, several issues swirl around the multimillion-dollar project, among the most critical in the short-term: Will opponents to the 23-story luxury development pursue legal challenges to block the project? Can common ground be found to settle the dispute? The opponents have rejected two overtures for a quick accord. Will the sharp downturn in the nation's housing market, particularly in the luxury segment, result in a delay of the project?
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,Sun Staff Writer | July 12, 1994
The value of building permits for new nonresidential construction in metropolitan Baltimore fell 85 percent in May, but the chief economist for the Baltimore Metropolitan Council said the figure was a statistical aberration in an industry that has been seeing a slow recovery.The Baltimore Metropolitan Council said developers took out permits for $3.3 million on new construction in May, well below the $21 million of permits issued in May 1993.But construction industry figures indicated conditions are better than that.
NEWS
BY A SUN REPORTER | May 21, 2006
Jo Ann Stolley has two visions as she relaxes on her third-floor deck. One is of the kaleidoscope sky as the sun sets. The other is a vision of things to come: a 23-story tower peering down on her and obliterating both her view and privacy. "It's a nightmare," she says almost in a whisper of the prospect. But plans for the multimillion-dollar residential and retail tower in downtown Columbia are progressing, even as opponents try desperately to block it. The project would be the signature building in the county, both in height and accoutrements and, more than any other structure, perhaps permanently transform the lakefront into a center for taller buildings and higher density.
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