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Building In Baltimore

BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,Staff Writer | September 13, 1992
Just two years ago, developers were scrambling to line up banks and other big companies as anchor tenants for beautiful new office buildings. Little did they know that the zenith of the early 1990s market would be established by government bureaucracies such as Medicare.Hurt by the recession, companies aren't spending money on new offices as they did five, or even three, years ago.That has left the federal government as the biggest player in Baltimore's office market this year. And with construction of speculative private office space virtually halted, the government could be the biggest force in building for several years.
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NEWS
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,Staff Writer | March 25, 1992
It was not a wave of historic appreciation that kept the General Assembly from deleting Maryland Day as a paid holiday this year. It was a wave of state employees that did the trick.History "had nothing to do with it," observed Bill Bolander, executive director of Council 92 of the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees, which represents 10,000 state employees. "It's just another benefit state employees have had for many years," one they would not give up without punishing legislators at the ballot box in the fall.
NEWS
May 28, 1991
Fifty tenants and more than 100 employees have been displaced as a result of a six-alarm fire that extensively damaged the Hillendale Square building in the 1000 block of Taylor Ave. in Baltimore County.The fire, believed started by an electrical malfunction in a third-floor office, was discovered at 5:30 a.m. yesterday by a passing cab driver who called the fire department, police said.No civilians were injured, but five firefighters were treated at hospitals for minor injuries, smoke inhalation or heat exhaustion, police said.
NEWS
By James Bock and Roger Twigg David Michael Ettlin of The Sun's metropolitan staff contributed to this article | May 28, 1991
A six-alarm fire early yesterday caused an estimated $3 million damage to a Baltimore County office building and resulted in minor injuries to five firefighters, fire officials said.Fifty tenants, including the National Multiple Sclerosis Society's Maryland branch, Pinkerton Security and the National Voluntary Health Agencies of Maryland, were displaced by the blaze in the 1000 block of Taylor Avenue."The third floor was completely gone, and the structure was pretty shaky. There is a big crack down one side," said Dori DiVenti, executive director of the National Multiple Sclerosis Society's Maryland chapter, which has offices on the second floor.
BUSINESS
February 18, 1991
D. R. Brasher, an architecture, planning and development consulting company, moved to the Equitable Bank Center, 10320 Little Patuxent Parkway, Suite 400, in Columbia.Richard N. Pridgeon and Leonard C. Nardone, an accounting and consulting practice in Baltimore, changed its name to Nardone, Pridgeon & Co. The firm is located at 600 Baltimore Ave., Suite 205, in Baltimore.Jane Bryant Quinn, a newspaper columnist, is to give the 1991 Frank R. Kent Memorial Lecture at the Johns Hopkins University on March 5. Ms. Quinn's lecture, "Staying Afloat: Your Money and the Economy After Iraq," begins at 8 p.m. in Shriver Hall on the Homewood Campus.
FEATURES
By Edward Gunts | December 30, 1990
We've seen it time and again -- so often, in fact, that it seems there ought to be a formula to explain it:The architectural quality of a new building is inversely proportional to the amount of good intentions behind it.Over the past year, there certainly was no shortage of building projects that were launched with the best of intentions -- yet turned out to have the worst of designs. If one theme could sum up the architectural activity in Baltimore during 1990, it might be the Year They Made a Good Thing Worse.
NEWS
November 26, 1990
Services for Henry C. Evans, a retired superintendent at the state office building in Baltimore, will be at 1 p.m. tomorrow at Immanuel Episcopal Church on Glencoe Road in Glencoe.Mr. Evans, a longtime resident of Lutherville, died Saturday of emphysema at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. He was 76.Born in Ebbw Vale, in Wales, Mr. Evans came to the United States with his family at the age of 8 and lived in Kingston, Pa. He received an engineering degree from Syracuse University and moved to Baltimore after World War II.A mechanical engineer, Mr. Evans oversaw operations at the state office building at 301 W. Preston St. from the time of its initial occupation in 1958 until his retirement in 1976.
NEWS
November 26, 1990
Henry C. Evans, 76, a retired superintendent at the state office building in Baltimore, died Saturday of emphysema at Greater Baltimore Medical Center.Funeral services will be at 1 p.m. tomorrow at Immanuel Episcopal Church on Glencoe Road in Glencoe.A long-time resident of Lutherville, Mr. Evans was born in Ebbw Vale, Wales. He came to the United States with his family at the age of 8 and lived in Kingston, Pa. He received an engineering degree from Syracuse University and moved to Baltimore after World War II.A mechanical engineer, Mr. Evans oversaw operations at the state office building at 301 W. Preston St. from its opening in 1958 until his retirement in 1976.
BUSINESS
September 24, 1990
One on One is a weekly feature offering excerpts of interviews conducted by The Evening Sun with newsworthy business leaders. Otis Warren is a local real estate broker and developer whose City Crescent project recently was chosen by the U.S. General Services Administration to be the new site for its offices. The project will mark the first time a minority-led development team has built a downtown office building in Baltimore.Your Crescent City project recently was chosen by the GSA to be the site of its new federal offices.
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