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Building In Baltimore

NEWS
March 10, 1997
IS THERE A new life for antiquated downtown office buildings? Legg Mason Realty Group, in a study commissioned by Downtown Partnership, thinks so. It suggests that Baltimore set a goal of converting vacant office buildings to 1,000 apartment units in the next five years.Cities across America -- from New York and Denver to Clevelandand New Orleans -- are in the midst of converting vacant office buildings to apartments.This seldom can be done without creative financing or, at the very least, without substantial tax abatements or relaxed zoning requirements.
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BUSINESS
March 9, 1997
Luxury homebuilder Toll Brothers Inc., which last built in Baltimore and Howard counties five years ago, announced it will return to the area and has hired a former executive with Ryland Homes to head its expansion.John Flaherty will serve as regional manager. Flaherty worked the last three years with Regency Homes as its regional manager. Before that he spent six years with Ryland as division president for the Baltimore area. He also worked 12 years with Ryan Homes."This is somewhat of a return for us after establishing ourselves in the Washington area.
NEWS
By Mary Maushard and Mary Maushard,SUN STAFF | September 24, 1996
The Waldorf School of Baltimore will be a nomad no more.After 25 years of holding classes in borrowed buildings, the growing independent school in Coldspring New Town is about to build its own home.A home for not only eight classrooms, but also the art, music, handwork and movement classes that are an integral part of Waldorf education.At Waldorf schools -- there are more than 100 in North America -- students learn to knit before they learn to read and paint before they print. Students, ideally, stay with the same teacher from first through eighth grade.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | August 25, 1996
By any standard, the French Renaissance-style office building at 26 South St. would have to be considered one of the safest places in Baltimore.Behind the building's limestone and granite facade are three walk-in vaults, one safe and eight "lock boxes" -- remnants from the days when it housed one of the city's leading commercial banks.They were too heavy to remove when partners of the law firm Scanlan & Rosen P.A. bought the building in 1994. So the new owners just converted them to alternative uses, including a law library and a sauna.
NEWS
By John M. Biers and John M. Biers,STATES NEWS SERVICE | August 2, 1996
WASHINGTON -- She won the war but could lose the monument.The plan to designate a new federal building in Baltimore County the Helen Delich Bentley Building has hit a snag. U.S. Rep. Elijah E. Cummings is blocking an effort led by Rep. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. and supported by the other six Maryland House members to '' name the new Health Care Financing Administration building after the fiery former congresswoman.Late Wednesday, Cummings, a 7th District Democrat, asked Rep. Wayne T. Gilchrest, a 1st District Republican, to put on hold the effort to name the building, which is in Woodlawn, in Cummings' district.
NEWS
By ANDREW RATNER | July 20, 1996
AFTER A FAMILY outing this summer to Fallingwater, the exquisite home designed by Frank Lloyd Wright that's been rTC called the ''best American building of the last 125 years,'' I left with mixed emotions.Perched atop a waterfall in southwest Pennsylvania, the structure is a masterpiece. It inspires awe, especially when one considers that Mr. Wright composed its modern lines back in the 1930s. The historic landmark is well worth the four-hour trip for Baltimoreans.But Fallingwater wasn't built for living.
BUSINESS
By Jana Sanchez-Klein and Jana Sanchez-Klein,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 9, 1996
Say "historic house" to many people, and they might conjure up an image of an antebellum mansion with graceful staircases and marble-floored ballrooms -- something out of "Gone With the Wind," perhaps.Glamorous images aside, historical homes are not always mansions. Basically, they are just old.Among them are houses in need of major renovations and houses located in older neighborhoods -- for good or bad."I read mostly Victorian-era novels. A lot of times what I read I can imagine taking place in this house," says Meredith Clark, 29, who lives with her husband, Vincent Liu, 32, and their extended family in an 1880s-era house in Reservoir Hill.
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Sun Staff Writer | October 21, 1994
Bucking the trend of manufacturers cutting back or closing city factories, W. R. Grace & Co. is constructing a $38.5 million chemical plant in the Curtis Bay area of Baltimore.Dignitaries from Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke to Gov. William Donald Schaefer, at yesterday's groundbreaking, praised the company's decision to build the 150,000-square-foot plant, which is expected to provide 50 new jobs when completed by the end of next year.The building of the plant was welcome in the city, where a number of manufacturing plants have either cutback or closed in recent years.
FEATURES
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Sun Staff Writer | August 21, 1994
Before NationsBank removed the giant "mn" letters last April from atop the former Maryland National Bank Building in Baltimore, its executives vowed to make the "bonnet" underneath look as good as new.Now that the $300,000 project is complete -- including repairs to the copper shingles and a new coat of gold leaf on the "ribs" and cornice -- it is apparent the bankers weren't exactly true to their word. They made it look even better.The restored tower at 10 Light St. -- now renamed the NationsBank Building -- never before looked the way it does today.
NEWS
By Sascha Segan and Sascha Segan,Contributing Writer | June 9, 1994
Peregrine falcons Felicity and Beauregard are taking care of two new hatchlings on a 33rd-floor ledge of the USF&G building in Baltimore.The 52nd and 53rd eyases born at the USF&G site are a week old. Two other eggs did not hatch.This is the third successful mating season for Felicity and Beauregard, whose offspring have been have been identified as far away as Dayton, Ohio, said John Barber, a USF&G employee and former Smithsonian ornithologist.Endangered 20 years ago, peregrines are returning to thriving numbers.
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