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Building In Baltimore

BUSINESS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,SUN STAFF | October 21, 2000
RewardsPlus.com, a Baltimore Web-based manager of employee benefits that has grown rapidly since its founding in 1996, is heading to the suburbs for more room - a disappointment to city officials seeking to stem the flow of companies out of downtown. The company will give up about 20,000 square feet it sublets in the Bank of America building on South Charles Street. Employees expect to begin moving in January to the former AAI Corp. building in Baltimore County, where RewardsPlus will occupy about four times that space.
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NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | October 5, 1999
Plans for a 35-story hotel and office building in Baltimore's downtown received a boost last night when a bill providing a second tax break for the project was introduced in City Council.Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke requested the payment in lieu of taxes, or PILOT, for the skyscraper that would be built at 1 Light St.The city granted $6.1 million in tax breaks for the project in June, but the developers have been seeking another PILOT that would save them an additional $9.5 million over 10 years.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | May 28, 1998
Neighbors are raising fire safety concerns about the newest housing development proposed for Baltimore's Canton waterfront -- 80 apartments that would be built above a boat storage and repair facility.Developer Selvin Passen maintains that the project would be "the safest building in Baltimore."Baltimore's Fire Department and Planning Commission haven't ruled on the final design, and construction can't begin until they do.Lighthouse Landing at Lighthouse Point is an $8 million to $9 million development that is drawing questions from residents of the Canton Cove condominiums at 2901 Boston St.What makes Lighthouse Landing different from other area developments is that the 80 apartments would be constructed on top of the 50-foot-high "boatel" at 2701 Boston St.Plans by Levin Brown & Associates call for three levels of residences above the boatel, which is designed to provide storage and repair space for up to 200 pleasure boats.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | May 11, 1998
A second growth of tiny new industries turning out goods you'll never see in a suburban mall is sprouting from the stubble of Baltimore's sooty old factories and foundries.A stone building at 330 W. 23rd St., off Howard Street, has become a banging and humming beehive dedicated to the work of artisans. It is a prime example of the creative reuse of buildings in Baltimore's smoke-stained industrial districts, where the rent is cheap and studios are large.The specialized customer list of the inhabitants is often downright amazing.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | October 22, 1997
In an age when most banks are gearing up for the electronic future as it's likely to unfold in Bill Gates' cyberspace, Baltimore's newest financial institution looks more like a scene out of Charles Dickens' London.When Chevy Chase Bank opens its first Baltimore-area branch Nov. 12, tellers will greet customers from inside an old-time banking cage, while managers toil by lamplight at roll-top desks.The building has the sort of grandeur that hasn't been seen in decades: Floors of marble from the same Italian quarry where Michelangelo got his stone.
FEATURES
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | September 21, 1997
On the rear wall of a just-renovated apartment building in Baltimore's Mount Vernon historic district, an unusually theatrical detail hints at the property's new use.High above the alley are bas-reliefs of the masks of Comedy and Tragedy.Projecting from a flat stucco wall like gargoyles, the masks provide a clue that the apartments inside have been created for interns and artists affiliated with Center Stage, two blocks away."No one told the contractor to do it," marveled project manager Del Risberg.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | September 11, 1997
The former Mercantile-Safe Deposit and Trust Co. building at Calvert and Redwood streets -- the oldest building in Baltimore's central business district to survive the Great Fire of 1904 -- will receive a face lift next year from a new owner aiming to revitalize it and find tenants.Brad Tavel, vice president for development of the company that owns the 1886 building, told members of Baltimore's Architectural Review Board last week that he recently sought proposals from contractors for the job of cleaning and repairing the exterior.
NEWS
August 14, 1997
IT IS EASY to understand why a Washington developer is eager to build the first high-rise apartment building in Baltimore's central business district in more than a decade. The corner of Howard and Lombard streets -- near an expanding University of Maryland campus, Camden Yards and the Baltimore-Washington Parkway -- is in an area where most existing rental complexes are fully occupied with long waiting lists.This project by Quadrangle Development Corp., a big Washington player that has not been previously active in Baltimore, is of bellwether significance for two reasons.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | August 8, 1997
A Washington developer wants to build the first high-rise apartment building in Baltimore's central business district in more than a decade -- a 16-story, 271-unit tower near the $H University of Maryland's rapidly expanding Baltimore campus.Quadrangle Development Corp. of Washington, builder of the Grand Hyatt Hotel at Washington Center, is seeking to acquire city-owned property at the northwest corner of Howard and Lombard streets for the project.Estimated to cost $20 million or more, the building would be Quadrangle's first in Baltimore and reflects the growing strength of the city's apartment market, especially on the west side of downtown.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | May 20, 1997
Fifty-five Baltimore County schools will get badly needed repairs faster after the County Council voted informally last night to recycle $1.8 million in proposed budget cuts.The county funds will supplement a similar amount of state money already promised to help aging county schools, and will be added to another $1.6 million the council trimmed from the proposed budget.Last week, the council decided to recycle the $1.6 million by spending it on major repair projects at five other aging schools.
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