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Building In Baltimore

NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | May 28, 1998
Neighbors are raising fire safety concerns about the newest housing development proposed for Baltimore's Canton waterfront -- 80 apartments that would be built above a boat storage and repair facility.Developer Selvin Passen maintains that the project would be "the safest building in Baltimore."Baltimore's Fire Department and Planning Commission haven't ruled on the final design, and construction can't begin until they do.Lighthouse Landing at Lighthouse Point is an $8 million to $9 million development that is drawing questions from residents of the Canton Cove condominiums at 2901 Boston St.What makes Lighthouse Landing different from other area developments is that the 80 apartments would be constructed on top of the 50-foot-high "boatel" at 2701 Boston St.Plans by Levin Brown & Associates call for three levels of residences above the boatel, which is designed to provide storage and repair space for up to 200 pleasure boats.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | May 11, 1998
A second growth of tiny new industries turning out goods you'll never see in a suburban mall is sprouting from the stubble of Baltimore's sooty old factories and foundries.A stone building at 330 W. 23rd St., off Howard Street, has become a banging and humming beehive dedicated to the work of artisans. It is a prime example of the creative reuse of buildings in Baltimore's smoke-stained industrial districts, where the rent is cheap and studios are large.The specialized customer list of the inhabitants is often downright amazing.
NEWS
By Mary Maushard and Mary Maushard,SUN STAFF | September 24, 1996
The Waldorf School of Baltimore will be a nomad no more.After 25 years of holding classes in borrowed buildings, the growing independent school in Coldspring New Town is about to build its own home.A home for not only eight classrooms, but also the art, music, handwork and movement classes that are an integral part of Waldorf education.At Waldorf schools -- there are more than 100 in North America -- students learn to knit before they learn to read and paint before they print. Students, ideally, stay with the same teacher from first through eighth grade.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | May 20, 1997
Fifty-five Baltimore County schools will get badly needed repairs faster after the County Council voted informally last night to recycle $1.8 million in proposed budget cuts.The county funds will supplement a similar amount of state money already promised to help aging county schools, and will be added to another $1.6 million the council trimmed from the proposed budget.Last week, the council decided to recycle the $1.6 million by spending it on major repair projects at five other aging schools.
NEWS
March 10, 1997
IS THERE A new life for antiquated downtown office buildings? Legg Mason Realty Group, in a study commissioned by Downtown Partnership, thinks so. It suggests that Baltimore set a goal of converting vacant office buildings to 1,000 apartment units in the next five years.Cities across America -- from New York and Denver to Clevelandand New Orleans -- are in the midst of converting vacant office buildings to apartments.This seldom can be done without creative financing or, at the very least, without substantial tax abatements or relaxed zoning requirements.
NEWS
By ERIC SIEGEL and ERIC SIEGEL,SUN REPORTER | December 1, 2005
City officials have selected a group that includes well-known developer Struever Bros., Eccles & Rouse to transform the long-vacant American Brewery building in a blighted corner of East Baltimore into the headquarters of a nonprofit social services provider. American Brewery LLC plans a $17 million conversion of the towering 19th-century brewhouse, a historic landmark, into the headquarters of Humanim Inc., a Columbia-based provider of mental health and other services. Humanim, which is part of the development team along with minority developer Gotham Development, plans to move 250 employees to the brewery once the project is completed and add 60 new jobs, according to documents submitted to the city.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,jacques.kelly@baltsun.com | May 11, 2009
It has the look of a classic urban parochial school: no-frills architecture, granite walls and stairs pounded by saddle shoes. And now, nearly four decades after the last pupil at what was then St. Ann's School closed a composition notebook, the three-story building at Greenmount Avenue and 22nd Street is being readied to accept a new school. Some of Baltimore's best-known philanthropists and charities - led by Ravens owner Steve Bisciotti and his wife, Renee - have donated $7 million to renovate the building to accommodate Mother Seton Academy, a 15-year-old school now housed in a Fells Point convent.
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts | ed.gunts@baltsun.com | March 31, 2010
Johns Hopkins has completed its purchase of the former Zurich Insurance Co. property in North Baltimore for $15 million and plans to take possession today. Brian Dembeck, executive director of Johns Hopkins Real Estate, said Hopkins plans to begin this spring to modify 415,000 square feet of office space on the property for use by more than 900 Hopkins employees who will move there in phases. He said the renovation would be a multimillion-dollar project, but he didn't give a specific figure.
BUSINESS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,SUN STAFF | March 8, 2005
James J. White, who left the port of Baltimore because of political tension with his new bosses in the Ehrlich administration, began a new job yesterday in New Jersey with a company that does business with about a dozen U.S. ports, including Baltimore's. White became senior vice president and chief operating officer of the Weehawken, N.J.-based stevedoring and terminal operating company Ceres Terminals Inc. The move eases the fears of some in Baltimore's maritime industry who thought White might take his reputation and contacts to a competing port.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2011
The doors of Baltimore's new Union Station, now Pennsylvania Station, swung open a century ago this week to welcome enthusiastic crowds of Baltimoreans, travelers and gawkers alike. Its completion was considered a great civic triumph after years of agitation from Baltimoreans, both prominent and humble, and newspapers calling for a new station that was worthy of the city. The present station, the third on the site, was constructed of granite, terra cotta and built on a structural steel frame.
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