Advertisement
HomeCollectionsBuilding In Baltimore
IN THE NEWS

Building In Baltimore

ENTERTAINMENT
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Sun Architecture Critic | May 18, 2003
Why are local preservationists so adamant about saving the Odorite building in Baltimore's Mount Vernon historic district? Do they prize its Elizabethan Tudor-style detailing? Its history as an early car showroom? Its connection to noted architects Wilson Smith and Howard May? Those are certainly valid reasons for preserving the two-story building at Maryland and Mount Royal avenues. But another strong reason for wanting to hold onto it has been the fear of the unknown -- uncertainty about what might take its place.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | October 22, 1997
In an age when most banks are gearing up for the electronic future as it's likely to unfold in Bill Gates' cyberspace, Baltimore's newest financial institution looks more like a scene out of Charles Dickens' London.When Chevy Chase Bank opens its first Baltimore-area branch Nov. 12, tellers will greet customers from inside an old-time banking cage, while managers toil by lamplight at roll-top desks.The building has the sort of grandeur that hasn't been seen in decades: Floors of marble from the same Italian quarry where Michelangelo got his stone.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | August 25, 1996
By any standard, the French Renaissance-style office building at 26 South St. would have to be considered one of the safest places in Baltimore.Behind the building's limestone and granite facade are three walk-in vaults, one safe and eight "lock boxes" -- remnants from the days when it housed one of the city's leading commercial banks.They were too heavy to remove when partners of the law firm Scanlan & Rosen P.A. bought the building in 1994. So the new owners just converted them to alternative uses, including a law library and a sauna.
FEATURES
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Sun architecture critic | February 13, 2008
Last year, Dr. Gavin Hamilton lived on the 17th floor of a new building in Baltimore's trendy Harbor East community. This year, the 32-year-old specialist in internal medicine found an apartment he likes even more -- a converted loft in the Station North Arts and Entertainment District. He's so pleased with it, he's throwing an Oscar party to show it off to his friends. "I like the layout and the high ceilings and the way they preserved the industrial feel of the building," he said. Plus, "it's on the route of the Hopkins shuttle and an easy walk to the train station and Tapas Teatro and the Charles Theatre.
FEATURES
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Sun Staff Writer | August 21, 1994
Before NationsBank removed the giant "mn" letters last April from atop the former Maryland National Bank Building in Baltimore, its executives vowed to make the "bonnet" underneath look as good as new.Now that the $300,000 project is complete -- including repairs to the copper shingles and a new coat of gold leaf on the "ribs" and cornice -- it is apparent the bankers weren't exactly true to their word. They made it look even better.The restored tower at 10 Light St. -- now renamed the NationsBank Building -- never before looked the way it does today.
BUSINESS
February 18, 1991
D. R. Brasher, an architecture, planning and development consulting company, moved to the Equitable Bank Center, 10320 Little Patuxent Parkway, Suite 400, in Columbia.Richard N. Pridgeon and Leonard C. Nardone, an accounting and consulting practice in Baltimore, changed its name to Nardone, Pridgeon & Co. The firm is located at 600 Baltimore Ave., Suite 205, in Baltimore.Jane Bryant Quinn, a newspaper columnist, is to give the 1991 Frank R. Kent Memorial Lecture at the Johns Hopkins University on March 5. Ms. Quinn's lecture, "Staying Afloat: Your Money and the Economy After Iraq," begins at 8 p.m. in Shriver Hall on the Homewood Campus.
BUSINESS
By Ross Hetrick and Ross Hetrick,Sun Staff Writer | October 21, 1994
Bucking the trend of manufacturers cutting back or closing city factories, W. R. Grace & Co. is constructing a $38.5 million chemical plant in the Curtis Bay area of Baltimore.Dignitaries from Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke to Gov. William Donald Schaefer, at yesterday's groundbreaking, praised the company's decision to build the 150,000-square-foot plant, which is expected to provide 50 new jobs when completed by the end of next year.The building of the plant was welcome in the city, where a number of manufacturing plants have either cutback or closed in recent years.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | December 6, 2010
The call echoed across Blue Mirrors just after 3:30 in the afternoon: "Smoke!" Within seconds, dark clouds choked the bar on The Block, the city's storied red-light district in the heart of downtown. Young women clad in slivers of lingerie grabbed coats and dashed outside, as the first firefighters streamed water onto the blaze that would grow to engulf four buildings on East Baltimore Street. "We were trying to get the girls out as soon as possible without getting any indecent exposure charges," said Jeff Jones, the owner of Blue Mirrors.
HEALTH
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | April 11, 2013
A large section of brick facade fell off a National Institutes of Health research facility on the Southeast Baltimore campus of Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center, reviving concerns about a building that opened two years late because of other problems. The incident, in which no one was injured, also has raised questions about safety in a city with many large buildings - but no laws requiring their exterior walls to be inspected as they age. Experts say such problems are relatively rare, but could become more common as building standards change.
BUSINESS
March 9, 1997
Luxury homebuilder Toll Brothers Inc., which last built in Baltimore and Howard counties five years ago, announced it will return to the area and has hired a former executive with Ryland Homes to head its expansion.John Flaherty will serve as regional manager. Flaherty worked the last three years with Regency Homes as its regional manager. Before that he spent six years with Ryland as division president for the Baltimore area. He also worked 12 years with Ryan Homes."This is somewhat of a return for us after establishing ourselves in the Washington area.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.