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NEWS
By Hal Piper and Hal Piper,SUN STAFF | December 6, 2000
Singing mock Christmas carols and chanting through bullhorns, about 100 Towson office workers demanded yesterday that they be relocated from the Investment Building, which they say is undermining their health. They unfurled a "Christmas card" to Gov. Parris N. Glendening, a banner that said, "All we want for Christmas is our health," and said they would send it to Annapolis with a petition signed by 363 people who work in the building. Most work for either Baltimore County or the state.
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NEWS
By ANDREW RATNER | July 20, 1996
AFTER A FAMILY outing this summer to Fallingwater, the exquisite home designed by Frank Lloyd Wright that's been rTC called the ''best American building of the last 125 years,'' I left with mixed emotions.Perched atop a waterfall in southwest Pennsylvania, the structure is a masterpiece. It inspires awe, especially when one considers that Mr. Wright composed its modern lines back in the 1930s. The historic landmark is well worth the four-hour trip for Baltimoreans.But Fallingwater wasn't built for living.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | September 11, 1997
The former Mercantile-Safe Deposit and Trust Co. building at Calvert and Redwood streets -- the oldest building in Baltimore's central business district to survive the Great Fire of 1904 -- will receive a face lift next year from a new owner aiming to revitalize it and find tenants.Brad Tavel, vice president for development of the company that owns the 1886 building, told members of Baltimore's Architectural Review Board last week that he recently sought proposals from contractors for the job of cleaning and repairing the exterior.
NEWS
By John M. Biers and John M. Biers,STATES NEWS SERVICE | August 2, 1996
WASHINGTON -- She won the war but could lose the monument.The plan to designate a new federal building in Baltimore County the Helen Delich Bentley Building has hit a snag. U.S. Rep. Elijah E. Cummings is blocking an effort led by Rep. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. and supported by the other six Maryland House members to '' name the new Health Care Financing Administration building after the fiery former congresswoman.Late Wednesday, Cummings, a 7th District Democrat, asked Rep. Wayne T. Gilchrest, a 1st District Republican, to put on hold the effort to name the building, which is in Woodlawn, in Cummings' district.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,Staff Writer | September 13, 1992
Just two years ago, developers were scrambling to line up banks and other big companies as anchor tenants for beautiful new office buildings. Little did they know that the zenith of the early 1990s market would be established by government bureaucracies such as Medicare.Hurt by the recession, companies aren't spending money on new offices as they did five, or even three, years ago.That has left the federal government as the biggest player in Baltimore's office market this year. And with construction of speculative private office space virtually halted, the government could be the biggest force in building for several years.
NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | January 23, 2002
In Baltimore County Funeral services set for officer killed in crash TOWSON - Funeral arrangements for Baltimore County police Sgt. Mark F. Parry, who died Monday of injuries suffered when his patrol car was hit Dec. 27 by a man accused of driving drunk, were announced yesterday. Sergeant Parry, 42, was a Bel Air resident and father of three. He was a 16-year veteran of the department, and the seventh in its 128-year history to be killed while on duty. Viewings and services will be in Bel Air, with visiting hours of 2 p.m. to 4 p.m. and 7 p.m. to 9 p.m. today and tomorrow at the Schimunek Funeral Home, 610 MacPhail Road, and a Mass will be offered at 10:30 a.m. Friday at St. Margaret Roman Catholic Church, 141 N. Hickory Ave. Burial will be in Dulaney Valley Memorial Gardens, 200 E. Padonia Road, Timonium.
NEWS
By Michael Ollove and Michael Ollove,Staff Writer | March 25, 1992
It was not a wave of historic appreciation that kept the General Assembly from deleting Maryland Day as a paid holiday this year. It was a wave of state employees that did the trick.History "had nothing to do with it," observed Bill Bolander, executive director of Council 92 of the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees, which represents 10,000 state employees. "It's just another benefit state employees have had for many years," one they would not give up without punishing legislators at the ballot box in the fall.
FEATURES
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | September 21, 1997
On the rear wall of a just-renovated apartment building in Baltimore's Mount Vernon historic district, an unusually theatrical detail hints at the property's new use.High above the alley are bas-reliefs of the masks of Comedy and Tragedy.Projecting from a flat stucco wall like gargoyles, the masks provide a clue that the apartments inside have been created for interns and artists affiliated with Center Stage, two blocks away."No one told the contractor to do it," marveled project manager Del Risberg.
BUSINESS
September 24, 1990
One on One is a weekly feature offering excerpts of interviews conducted by The Evening Sun with newsworthy business leaders. Otis Warren is a local real estate broker and developer whose City Crescent project recently was chosen by the U.S. General Services Administration to be the new site for its offices. The project will mark the first time a minority-led development team has built a downtown office building in Baltimore.Your Crescent City project recently was chosen by the GSA to be the site of its new federal offices.
NEWS
By Dana Klosner-Wehner and Dana Klosner-Wehner,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 4, 2003
HOLLYWOOD HAS come to Baltimore, and Frank Hazzard had a chance to be part of it last week. Touchstone Pictures is shooting Ladder 49, a film starring Joaquin Phoenix, John Travolta, Jacinda Barrett and Morris Chestnut on location in and around Baltimore until next month. The film is about firefighters, and the Baltimore City Fire Department is taking a "co-starring" role. Hazzard, who is captain of Baltimore's Engine 58 and lives in Hickory Ridge, will go down in movie-making history as the fourth guy from the left in the front row in the Medals Day Ceremony scene.
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