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Building Bridges

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NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | November 18, 1999
In an effort to foster greater collaboration among Anne Arundel County schools and businesses, a local foundation has created an Internet-based clearinghouse intended to make it easier to form partnerships.The centerpiece of the initiative, called Building Bridges, is a Web site intended to meet the needs of educators, students and employers. It could be used for such diverse purposes as finding guest speakers, creating student internships or starting a mentoring program.Sponsored by the 21st Century Education Foundation, a group of area business leaders, the Building Bridges Web site is scheduled to be unveiled today by school officials and local business people.
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NEWS
By Jonah Goldberg | September 6, 2012
A few years ago, it was fashionable for Democratsto describe themselves as "members of the reality-based community. " These days, it seems the foreclosure crisis has hit them so hard they've been forced to move to another neighborhood. Metaphorically, at least, they've set up a refugee camp in Charlotte this week. In this political Brigadoon, things are going well in America, so well in fact that President Barack Obama obviously deserves a second term because Americans are better off than they were four years ago, and that the Republican Party is little more than a haven for old-fashioned robber barons who think like Klansmen but dress like Mr. Monopoly.
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NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | November 18, 1999
In an effort to foster greater collaboration among county schools and businesses, a local foundation has created an Internet-based clearinghouse intended to make it easier to form partnerships.The centerpiece of the initiative, called Building Bridges, is a Web site intended to meet the needs of educators, students and employers. It could be used for such diverse purposes as finding guest speakers, creating student internships or starting a mentoring program.Sponsored by the 21st Century Education Foundation, a group of area business leaders, the Building Bridges Web site is scheduled to be unveiled today by school officials and local business people.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | August 7, 2011
Residents and vendors from the many corners and cultures of Baltimore descended on the campus of Polytechnic Institute/Western High this weekend for the annual Baltimore International Festival. "I just believe that people need to meet other people," said Maritza Smith, who traveled from Anne Arundel County to spread a blanket, sit under an umbrella and listen to ethnic bands perform. "It shows that, believe it or not, while we're all different, we all have something in common. Too many people don't know that.
NEWS
By Jean Leslie and Jean Leslie,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 5, 2002
"In 1995, I was 41 years old and I thought I was living the way I wanted - no children, never married. I wondered, `Why wasn't I happy?' "Then a young, very sincere, dedicated teacher of Buddhism came to Hampden in Baltimore City. It was quite amazing, and I was very inspired. What inspired me was his integrity, the way that he had actualized Buddhist teaching into his own behavior. I fell in love with Buddhist teachings. "I had been raised a Catholic and attended parochial school. Although we didn't go to church every Sunday, we held certain values.
NEWS
August 6, 2010
Your editorial about freedom and religion (Aug. 5) misses several points. You state the following, "The mosque's sponsors described their purpose as one of building bridges between Muslims and the West, with the aim of fostering greater understanding and tolerance among the world's religions and a recognition of our common humanity. The mosque and cultural center near ground zero would be a visible symbol of reconciliation and ecumenical cooperation .... " I am sure that there are many other building sites available in New York that are not adjacent to ground zero and where it would not be thumbing its nose at those who died there.
NEWS
By Kelly Brewington and Kelly Brewington,Sun reporter | November 18, 2006
When Juan Carlos Ruiz suggested to fellow organizers that tens of thousands of immigrants would descend on Washington to protest restrictive immigration reform legislation, they laughed at him. But on March 7, immigrants and their supporters flocked to the steps of the Capitol. And they swept into the streets again on April 10 for large rallies in Washington and other cities nationwide. The demonstrations were effective only because organizers reached beyond racial and ethnic barriers to build allies and tap into common bonds, Ruiz said yesterday to an audience of academics, activists and social service providers at Baltimore's third Immigration Summit sponsored by Towson University and the city.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,SUN STAFF | December 5, 2000
Teisha Leak and Pierre Kapange might be performing the experiments, but they are also the guinea pigs in a laboratory at Goucher College. The two Baltimore City Community College students are the first participants in a program designed to help minority community college students make the transition to a four-year college science curriculum. Alerted to small number of minorities in the sciences at meetings of the American Society for Microbiology, Goucher professor LeLeng To came up with the idea of bringing the best science students at BCCC - where the majority of students are African-American - up to speed in the laboratory.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | June 27, 2003
They converged from all over town yesterday to stand on the new Charles Street bridge, drinking white wine, swaying to live jazz music and watching a Korean dance troupe kick off a long-anticipated event -- the official reopening of Baltimore's main thoroughfare. "We're ready," said Dan Gilbert, a Midtown neighborhood leader, as he stood on the bridge during a lively block party last night. "I think the area will really pop now." The new bridge opens today after an oft-delayed construction project detoured traffic from one of the city's most crucial passages for three years, splitting the street in two. After a ribbon-cutting ceremony today, Charles Street will become whole again and traffic will be able to navigate north past Pennsylvania Station.
NEWS
By Jeff Zeleny and Jeff Zeleny,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | November 19, 2004
LITTLE ROCK, Ark. - The sun did not shine upon Bill Clinton at the dedication of his library here yesterday, but a cold, persistent rain seemed to wash away any stain of controversy or discord as his fellow presidents showered him with praise and recognized his place in history. A rare chapter in American politics unfolded in this Southern capital as President Bush and two former presidents, Jimmy Carter and George H.W. Bush, played the role of cordial statesmen as they positively reflected on the 42nd president.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | August 16, 2010
The device that Mehdi Kalantari hopes will revolutionize monitoring of the structural integrity of bridges around the world is about as small and flat as a credit card and is powered by the sun, by ambient light or even by stray radio waves it can pick out of the atmosphere. An Iranian immigrant and electrical engineer at the University of Maryland, College Park, Kalantari has devised what he calls a lightweight, low-power, wireless sensor that he hopes will detect weaknesses in bridges and other infrastructure before they can turn into calamities such as the collapse of the Interstate 35W bridge that killed 13 people in Minneapolis in 2007.
NEWS
August 6, 2010
Your editorial about freedom and religion (Aug. 5) misses several points. You state the following, "The mosque's sponsors described their purpose as one of building bridges between Muslims and the West, with the aim of fostering greater understanding and tolerance among the world's religions and a recognition of our common humanity. The mosque and cultural center near ground zero would be a visible symbol of reconciliation and ecumenical cooperation .... " I am sure that there are many other building sites available in New York that are not adjacent to ground zero and where it would not be thumbing its nose at those who died there.
NEWS
By JANENE HOLABERG | June 27, 2008
No public monument defines a city any better than a distinctive bridge. Think of the Brooklyn Bridge in New York or the Golden Gate Bridge in San Francisco. Then there are bridges that go largely unnoticed because they're just not visually memorable, such as the Key Bridge, which serves without fanfare to move Beltway traffic 1,200 feet across the Baltimore Harbor. When a beloved bridge comes up for replacement, local residents experience a fierce sense of ownership based on their collective memories, said Frederick Gottemoeller of Columbia.
NEWS
By Jeff Seidel | April 27, 2008
Edgewood's Amanda Holsclaw recently broke the school record for career lacrosse goals -- for girls and boys. Holsclaw had 199 goals as of Thursday, surpassing the previous mark of 189, and the Rams had three regular-season games left. The senior, who's headed to Salisbury in the fall to play lacrosse, has been consistent throughout her Edgewood career. She had 55 goals and 13 assists through Thursday. That comes after a 76-goal, 19-assist junior season (despite battling painful hip flexor problems)
NEWS
By Ruma Kumar and Ruma Kumar,Sun reporter | August 26, 2007
The people who work closely with Anne Arundel County Schools Superintendent Kevin M. Maxwell have gotten used to one thing: book reports. First it was Good to Great, by Jim Collins. His deputies had to be able to discuss how its principles for a successful business could be applied to the smooth running of a school system. Nearly every month since his first day as school chief last July, Maxwell has had a new book for his crew. These days, it's Execution: The Art of Getting Things Done, co-authored by a former General Electric executive who writes that it's not what you plan to do that makes a place successful, but how you carry out the reform that makes the difference.
NEWS
By Sharahn D. Boykin and Sharahn D. Boykin,Sun reporter | June 6, 2007
With a loud pop and crack, it took only seconds to destroy what had taken three Naval Academy seniors a year to build. Yesterday, newly commissioned Ensign Kevin Meier loaded the trio's 2-foot-long bridge into a guillotine-like contraption as part of a nationwide competition for collegiate mechanical engineering students. The bridge rested between two brackets that held it steady while a mechanical foot pushed down and applied weight to the bridge. Meier estimated the bridge, made of carbon fiber, could hold 7,000 pounds.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | January 22, 2002
Just outside his office window, University of Baltimore President H. Mebane Turner can observe the building of the major city bridge that will be named for him. It seems an apt image for a man who has tried to bridge gaps between city communities in public education for more than three decades, roughly framed by the riots of 1968 and the terrorist attacks of Sept. 11. The $23.8 million bridge carrying Charles Street, one of the city's main arteries, over Amtrak mainline tracks and the Jones Falls Expressway, is to open in October or November, Amtrak officials said.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | March 20, 2002
E. Joseph Weber, a former Martin Marietta Corp. aeronautical engineer whose career spanned the period from flying boats to Titan missiles, died March 13 of heart failure at Bedford Court Nursing Home in Silver Spring. He was 93. Mr. Weber was born in Erie, Pa., where he graduated from high school. He began his engineering career in 1930 after earning a bachelor's degree in civil engineering from Pennsylvania State University. As a youth, Mr. Weber dreamed of designing and building bridges.
NEWS
By Kelly Brewington and Kelly Brewington,Sun reporter | November 18, 2006
When Juan Carlos Ruiz suggested to fellow organizers that tens of thousands of immigrants would descend on Washington to protest restrictive immigration reform legislation, they laughed at him. But on March 7, immigrants and their supporters flocked to the steps of the Capitol. And they swept into the streets again on April 10 for large rallies in Washington and other cities nationwide. The demonstrations were effective only because organizers reached beyond racial and ethnic barriers to build allies and tap into common bonds, Ruiz said yesterday to an audience of academics, activists and social service providers at Baltimore's third Immigration Summit sponsored by Towson University and the city.
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