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By Michael Gold and The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2013
The Gay and Lesbian Community Center of Baltimore (GLCCB) has sold its Mount Vernon headquarters, the organization announced Wednesday. The decision to sell the building was made "to address ongoing community concerns with the inadequacy of the GLCCB's present space," according to a statement from the group's board of directors. The building's sale comes two months after the GLCCB opened a new public resources center on the ground floor of its building, and it appears future expansion and changes may be on the way. Executive director Matthew Thorn said in a statement that the 36-year-old organization is interested in a new space that can offer "a venue for interested community organizations to work in concert in a shared space.
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NEWS
By Ian Duncan, The Baltimore Sun | April 19, 2014
Baltimore State's Attorney Gregg L. Bernstein got to work on his re-election campaign in a low-key way Saturday, knocking on the doors of likely voters in Northwest Baltimore and asking for their support. It was one of the first campaign activities Bernstein has organized this year, and while he confirmed last summer that he intended to run again, he has been reluctant to talk about the political side of his job. On each doorstep he made no big promises about the future but pointed to his record in office.
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NEWS
September 30, 2013
The Baltimore City Urban Design and Architectural Review Panel should agree to the request to redesign the Exelon Corporation building at Harbor Point made by the developer ("Developer proposes to convert some Exelon office space to apartments," Sept. 27) upon one condition - that they build the building higher! It has been decades since a skyscraper of significant height has been built in Baltimore City. Not only would a gleaming new tower be a reflection to the world that this city is on the move, but it would also conserve valuable downtown real estate.
NEWS
April 17, 2014
It is unclear why Dan Rodricks would insult historic preservationists by dismissing our efforts in 1988-1989 to save the beloved, completely reusable McCormick building as "ridiculous and quaint" ( "Investment in Baltimore, beyond our expectations," April 15). How does the prospect of a repurposed McCormick building differ from the reuse of the Baltimore Trust Company he then lauds a few paragraphs down? His assertion that preservationists advocated retaining McCormick as a vacant building is a total invention to suit his purpose, whatever that might be. Adaptive reuse was already common practice 25 years ago, even an expectation when possible.
BUSINESS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | October 27, 2011
The Navy has awarded a contract of up to $10 million to a Baltimore firm for architectural, engineering and other services at installations throughout the mid-Atlantic, the Defense Department announced Thursday. Mimar Architects Inc. beat 64 other bidders to win the agreement to perform work for the Naval Facilities Engineering Command including building construction and renovation work; facility planning; obtaining permits and regulatory approvals; and U.S. Green Building Council leadership in energy and environmental design.
EXPLORE
Letter to The Aegis | May 10, 2012
Editor:  In response to the person who wrote a letter condemning the county for building a new Emergency Operations Center, let me ask:  What was the most important building in the county in February of 2010? Not a school. There was a blizzard - schools were all closed.  What was the most important building in the county in August of 2011? Not a school. There was a hurricane - schools were all closed.  What is the more important building in the county between the middle of June and August?
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | January 3, 2011
Harford County officials have closed the council building in Bel Air because of structural problems and are moving several offices and about 72 people, including the seven members of the County Council, out of the location. The Harford County Council, the Department of Public Works and the Cultural Arts Board moved to temporary sites Monday while the three-story building on South Bond Street undergoes further structural reviews. It is "untenable for occupancy," county officials said.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay | liz.kay@baltsun.com | March 31, 2010
Eastern Avenue was closed in both directions at Broadway after a building collapsed Tuesday morning, Baltimore police and fire officials said. According to state tax records, the building, the former Eastern Auto Supply Co., is owned by 504 South Broadway LLC - the address of the Ritz Cabaret. The cabaret owners planned to open a steakhouse, said Jason Sullivan, the executive director of Fells Point Main Street. The owners could not be reached for comment. City firefighters responded at 8:45 a.m. to a report of a building in dangerous condition, said Chief Kevin Cartwright, a department spokesman.
NEWS
July 1, 2010
FREDERICK, Md. (AP) — Streets were closed and power was shut off in downtown Frederick following a fire that tore through a commercial building. Authorities say 25 fire companies were called to battle the fire that broke out shortly after 7 p.m. Wednesday at a building on South Carroll Street. The blaze caused the roof and part of a wall of the building to collapse. Electricity in the area was shut off after firefighters confirmed a propane tank was inside the building.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop | June 12, 2012
The John R. Hargrove Sr. building of Baltimore's district court closed shortly after 9 a.m. Tuesday because of a nearby water main break that left the facility without water. It's unclear when the building,  on the 700 block of E. Patapsco Ave.,  will reopen and resume hearing cases. Bail reviews were transferred to the Borgerding district court location at 5800 Wabash Ave, and other cases were postponed, said judiciary spokeswoman Terri Bolling. The water main break occurred on the 3600 block of Brooklyn Ave., Bolling said.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | April 14, 2014
The Edgar Allan Poe House and Museum today looks onto a tree stump and a grassy lot, but that view could soon change with the construction of two large, orange-accented apartment buildings. It's the first phase of a long-awaited redevelopment of the Poppleton area. The go-ahead last week from the city's urban design and architecture review panel is one of the first steps forward since ambitious plans to overhaul a 13.8-acre portion of the neighborhood were announced almost a decade ago. Just west of Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard, the $800 million, 10-year redevelopment of Poppleton is supposed to build on the expansion of the University of Maryland's BioPark and ultimately create more than 1,000 residential units, a new charter school, shopping and parks in a neighborhood once riddled with crime and drug activity.
NEWS
By Kevin Rector, The Baltimore Sun | April 13, 2014
Tourists never come to see the cherry blossoms in West Baltimore, in the heart of what local residents warmly refer to as "the hood. " But they could, as far as Marvin "Doc" Cheatham is concerned. "We could have people ride through, neighbors selling hot dogs and hamburgers, saying, 'You don't got to go to Washington for cherry blossoms!'" Cheatham said this weekend from his front steps in the 1600 block of Appleton St. The block has about 40 occupied homes, 11 boarded-up vacants, and about a dozen cherry trees - planted by the city in the 1970s, as Cheatham recalls.
ENTERTAINMENT
Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | April 11, 2014
Tooloulou is moving from Lauraville to Belvedere Square. The Cajun eatery will open in Belvedere Square's main market building later this spring, according to chef-owner Shawn Lagergren. Lagergren said he considered operating Tooloulou at both Belvedere Square and the Harford Road location that he opened in January 2011. But he decided he didn't want to entrust either location to anyone else. "We were going to try to keep [the Harford Road location] going," Lagergren said, "but if I can't be there every day, I would worry about potentially disappointing customers.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | April 10, 2014
A developer unveiled designs for the next Inner Harbor skyscraper - a 43-story residential tower sheathed in reflective blue glass on the site of the former McCormick & Co. spice factory - at a meeting Thursday with city officials. The renderings by a prominent Chicago architecture firm met with praise during the presentation to the city's Urban Design and Architecture Review Panel. Questar Properties' plans call for a three-level building at 414 Light St. that rises to nearly 500 feet at its tallest, with an angled peak.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman | April 9, 2014
Lupin Pharmaceuticals, Inc. has placed its name in lights over the Inner Harbor, a mark of the Indian drug manufacturer's growing presence since the company located its U.S. headquarters in Baltimore more than a decade ago. Lupin, which today sells about 70 different generic products in the United States, started with three people in small offices at the World Trade Center in the early 2000s. It now employs more than 60 people on two floors at 111 S. Calvert Street, part of a U.S. workforce about 200-strong, said Mary Furlong, executive vice president of corporate development.
NEWS
By Jennifer Bodensiek | April 8, 2014
The Maryland legislature last week passed a 2015 budget, and it includes $12 million to help create jobs in Maryland's innovative biotech and life science sector. That's a smart use of resources. For lawmakers looking to put residents back to work, our state's high-tech sectors have been bright spots - especially our vanguard biotech industry, which accounts for more than 11 percent of the Maryland economy. In Baltimore, Emergent Technologies is now staffing 200 new workers; this year, Montgomery County's Precision for Medicine will add 170 to the rolls; and in 2011, Frederick-based Life Technologies hired 100 people.
NEWS
AEGIS STAFF REPORT | March 24, 2014
Colliers International in Baltimore, a full-service commercial real estate firm, brokered the sale of a fully leased 53,000-square-foot industrial-flex building at 1361 Brass Mill Road in Belcamp, for $5.5 million. Colliers represented the seller Northcross East, a Harford County developer. "This continues the trend of interest in stabilized, well-located industrial-flex assets in the North I-95 Corridor," David Dannenfelser, managing director and principal of Colliers | Baltimore, said.
NEWS
December 1, 2009
Baltimore County police said that a vehicle left the 8200 block of Glen Michael Lane about 5 p.m. Monday and hit a nearby building, causing considerable damage. Officers of the Woodlawn Precinct said there were no injuries and that the accident remains under investigation. - Jacques Kelly
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | April 4, 2014
In the shadow of Baltimore's City Hall is a 200-year-old building that has been the seat of city government, a school for African-American children and a museum that displayed a mastodon skeleton and the embalmed head of a New Zealand native. Now, a fledgling nonprofit is looking to reinvent the space once again. Organizers want to transform the old Peale Museum into a hub celebrating Baltimore history and architecture with exhibits, a cafe, a lecture hall and office space. But the Peale - closed since 1997 - is in bad shape.
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