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By Michael Gold and The Baltimore Sun | June 13, 2013
The Gay and Lesbian Community Center of Baltimore (GLCCB) has sold its Mount Vernon headquarters, the organization announced Wednesday. The decision to sell the building was made "to address ongoing community concerns with the inadequacy of the GLCCB's present space," according to a statement from the group's board of directors. The building's sale comes two months after the GLCCB opened a new public resources center on the ground floor of its building, and it appears future expansion and changes may be on the way. Executive director Matthew Thorn said in a statement that the 36-year-old organization is interested in a new space that can offer "a venue for interested community organizations to work in concert in a shared space.
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NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | September 3, 2014
An anonymous call reporting an armed person holding a hostage at the University of Maryland, College Park prompted campus police to search the Main Administration building and two others Wednesday before declaring the report unfounded. When the call came in at 3:27 p.m., the department evacuated and swept the administration building, which houses the offices of the president and provost, and nearby Lee and Mitchell buildings, police said. Lee and Mitchell contain the bursar and registrar's offices, respectively.
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BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman | September 3, 2014
The Daily Record plans to sell its Saratoga Street home of almost 100 years and is looking downtown for “nicer,” “modern” offices for its 35 employees, publisher Suzanne Fischer-Huettner said Wednesday. The decision to sell the five-story building was made this summer after representatives from The Dolan Co., the Daily Record's parent company, visited the offices of the legal newspaper, Fischer-Huettner said. Minnesota-based Dolan Co. emerged from Chapter 11 bankruptcy in June.
FEATURES
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | September 3, 2014
Pastor Elbert Street noticed a small crack in the wall behind the pulpit at Grace Christian Baptist Church. It widened. Then a branch appeared. A cluster of leaves unfurled. That was when Street realized that something was growing between the walls of his East Baltimore church: an 8-foot-tall tree. The 79-year-old pastor and others took the wall apart, hacked down the tree and hauled away bags of branches and roots. The tree came back. They cut it down again. And then again.
BUSINESS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | October 27, 2011
The Navy has awarded a contract of up to $10 million to a Baltimore firm for architectural, engineering and other services at installations throughout the mid-Atlantic, the Defense Department announced Thursday. Mimar Architects Inc. beat 64 other bidders to win the agreement to perform work for the Naval Facilities Engineering Command including building construction and renovation work; facility planning; obtaining permits and regulatory approvals; and U.S. Green Building Council leadership in energy and environmental design.
NEWS
September 30, 2013
The Baltimore City Urban Design and Architectural Review Panel should agree to the request to redesign the Exelon Corporation building at Harbor Point made by the developer ("Developer proposes to convert some Exelon office space to apartments," Sept. 27) upon one condition - that they build the building higher! It has been decades since a skyscraper of significant height has been built in Baltimore City. Not only would a gleaming new tower be a reflection to the world that this city is on the move, but it would also conserve valuable downtown real estate.
EXPLORE
Letter to The Aegis | May 10, 2012
Editor:  In response to the person who wrote a letter condemning the county for building a new Emergency Operations Center, let me ask:  What was the most important building in the county in February of 2010? Not a school. There was a blizzard - schools were all closed.  What was the most important building in the county in August of 2011? Not a school. There was a hurricane - schools were all closed.  What is the more important building in the county between the middle of June and August?
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | January 3, 2011
Harford County officials have closed the council building in Bel Air because of structural problems and are moving several offices and about 72 people, including the seven members of the County Council, out of the location. The Harford County Council, the Department of Public Works and the Cultural Arts Board moved to temporary sites Monday while the three-story building on South Bond Street undergoes further structural reviews. It is "untenable for occupancy," county officials said.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | July 31, 2014
Beatty Development Group said Thursday that it hopes to break ground early next year on its next building in Harbor Point — an 18-story complex with 285 apartments. The development firm, which is working with Henson Development Co. on the Point Street Apartments, outlined plans before the city's design review panel for the 290,000-square-foot building, which would be located on what is currently a parking lot just west of the historic Ferndale Fence & Awning building and behind Thames Street Wharf, where Morgan Stanley has its offices.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay | liz.kay@baltsun.com | March 31, 2010
Eastern Avenue was closed in both directions at Broadway after a building collapsed Tuesday morning, Baltimore police and fire officials said. According to state tax records, the building, the former Eastern Auto Supply Co., is owned by 504 South Broadway LLC - the address of the Ritz Cabaret. The cabaret owners planned to open a steakhouse, said Jason Sullivan, the executive director of Fells Point Main Street. The owners could not be reached for comment. City firefighters responded at 8:45 a.m. to a report of a building in dangerous condition, said Chief Kevin Cartwright, a department spokesman.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman | September 3, 2014
The Daily Record plans to sell its Saratoga Street home of almost 100 years and is looking downtown for “nicer,” “modern” offices for its 35 employees, publisher Suzanne Fischer-Huettner said Wednesday. The decision to sell the five-story building was made this summer after representatives from The Dolan Co., the Daily Record's parent company, visited the offices of the legal newspaper, Fischer-Huettner said. Minnesota-based Dolan Co. emerged from Chapter 11 bankruptcy in June.
NEWS
Allison Eatough and For The Baltimore Sun | September 2, 2014
H elen Martinaitis patiently sits in the passenger seat of Jim Madachy's car as he drives away from her Columbia apartment complex. Martinaitis is on her way to an Ellicott City assisted-living center, where her husband of 63 years lives, battling dementia. “Do you have a preferred way to go?” Madachy asks Martinaitis. “No, you're driving,” Martinaitis says with a laugh. “Where'd you live before?” Madachy asks. “Connecticut,” she says.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | September 2, 2014
Maryland is in the running for a data storage center with its own sizable power plant, a project planned for the University of Delaware until officials there spiked it amid an uproar over its scale and potential effect on the community. The Data Centers LLC said it's looking in Cecil County and elsewhere in Maryland as well as in Delaware and five other states. The company, which goes by TDC, eventually hopes to build two to three of the projects a year. Now, though, TDC is hunting for land for its inaugural project — which has proved harder to launch than the Pennsylvania firm anticipated.
NEWS
By Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | September 2, 2014
Water restrictions remain in place at the Hanover Square Apartments in Otterbein, where one resident was diagnosed with Legionnaires' disease in mid-July, according to the city's Health Department. The July 18 case is the only one associated with the 1 West Conway Street tower, where the city is monitoring efforts to test and clear the water, said Health Department spokesman Michael Schwartzberg. He said he did not have more information about the patient's status. Legionnaires' disease, a type of pneumonia, spreads through the inhalation of tiny droplets of contaminated water.
NEWS
September 1, 2014
The general election is still more than two months away but here's a bit of friendly advice to candidates hoping to win office in Maryland: Don't use the Conowingo Dam as an excuse to stop cleaning up the Chesapeake Bay. That would seem like common sense but it's become increasingly clear that damning the dam has become a popular political strategy. Republican gubernatorial candidate Larry Hogan released a 30-second ad through his website last month that essentially blames the Conowingo for the bay's woes and urges voters to fight back against other pollution-fighting strategies endorsed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the Democratically-controlled state government.
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | August 31, 2014
The rise of this city in Harford County and its decline owed much to U.S. 40 and the car-centric culture of 20th century America. From World War II to the 1960s, motels and gas stations sprouted along the main road from Baltimore to Philadelphia to accommodate road-weary travelers. Diners served up coffee and gossip to neighbors and road-trippers alike on what was also the main local drag. But when Interstate 95 opened, running parallel to U.S. 40 just a few miles to the west, the flow of out-of-town cars slowed to a trickle.
NEWS
July 1, 2010
FREDERICK, Md. (AP) — Streets were closed and power was shut off in downtown Frederick following a fire that tore through a commercial building. Authorities say 25 fire companies were called to battle the fire that broke out shortly after 7 p.m. Wednesday at a building on South Carroll Street. The blaze caused the roof and part of a wall of the building to collapse. Electricity in the area was shut off after firefighters confirmed a propane tank was inside the building.
NEWS
December 1, 2009
Baltimore County police said that a vehicle left the 8200 block of Glen Michael Lane about 5 p.m. Monday and hit a nearby building, causing considerable damage. Officers of the Woodlawn Precinct said there were no injuries and that the accident remains under investigation. - Jacques Kelly
SPORTS
By Louis Krauss and The Baltimore Sun | August 30, 2014
On a hot and misty July morning in the woods near Savage, several kids and adults screamed with joy as they flew past treetops on a zip line. There was joy, and probably more than a little fear, in those Tarzan yells. Zooming down the 330-foot-long cable, zip liners, the staff of Terrapin Adventures estimates, can reach speeds of up to 20 mph. In other words, it's far from a typical day at work. Founder and owner Matt Baker, who started Terrapin Adventures six years ago in a woodsy patch of Howard County, said the courses, which combine simple fun with team-building activities, strive for "the 'Aha!
NEWS
By Carrie Wells, The Baltimore Sun | August 27, 2014
A team of Johns Hopkins University undergraduates was named a finalist in a competition to build a real-life version of the tricorder, a fictional device used on the TV show "Star Trek" to diagnose health ailments. The stakes are high — the Hopkins team could win a portion of a $10 million prize sponsored by wireless communications company Qualcomm and end up with a device that could be sold for medical use. But the competition for the Qualcomm Tricorder Xprize is fierce. The Hopkins team is the only undergraduate group, and it faces nine other teams from around the world, including from India, Taiwan and the United Kingdom.
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