Advertisement
HomeCollectionsBuild The Tower
IN THE NEWS

Build The Tower

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Ellie Baublitz and Ellie Baublitz,SUN STAFF | January 24, 2001
County public safety officials plan to move forward with a new tower in Lineboro and will tap the expertise of state agencies to choose a site that will eliminate a gap in emergency communications. Buddy Redman, director of public safety, plans to meet next week with officials from the Maryland Institute for Emergency Medical Services and the state Department of Management and Budget's General Services to revisit prospective sites for the tower. The agencies have surveyed sites in Carroll County and southern Pennsylvania.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Sun reporter | July 25, 2008
Opponents of a proposed 23-story tower in Columbia have won their first legal victory in more than two years with a decision by Maryland's second-highest court that could give them a chance to argue their case before the county appeals board. The Court of Special Appeals ruling reverses a year-old Howard County Circuit Court decision and grants legal standing to Joel Broida, one of four residents who appealed the February 2006 decision to let the mixed-use tower planned by WCI Communities go forward.
Advertisement
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,SUN STAFF | October 24, 1996
Five companies, including two from Maryland, submitted bids ranging from $118,555 to $168,900 yesterday to build a 220-foot emergency communications tower in Sykesville.UNR Rohn of Peoria, Ill., was the low bidder in the competition to "design, ship, and erect" the tower, which officials said will improve emergency communications.The tower, which will eliminate transmission blackouts in South Carroll, will be built on a site at Springfield Hospital Center. It is the final piece of the county's $8.2 million, seven-tower emergency communications system.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,Sun reporter | August 23, 2007
Finding that the risks of building a cell phone tower near tennis courts and athletic fields at Randallstown High School were too great, the Baltimore County Board of Appeals overturned yesterday a zoning commissioner's ruling to allow the project. The three-member panel debated the proposal for about an hour before unanimously agreeing that T-Mobile should not be allowed to lease a patch of land on the high school campus to build the tower. "I don't think a school is an appropriate place for a cell tower," said Margaret M. Brassil, chairwoman of the panel considering the cell tower case.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun Staff Writer | September 27, 1994
Cellular One remains firm in its resolve to build a 200-foot telecommunications tower near Sykesville, despite procedural delays and neighborhood complaints."
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | September 28, 2001
Ending a seven-month wait, the Federal Communications Commission decided yesterday to allow a 340-foot-high emergency radio tower just outside historic Ellicott City -- an announcement that relieved Howard County officials and dismayed neighbors. The tower -- a key part of an upgrade to the county's public safety communications system -- attracted controversy as soon as local officials announced the site, which is next to Howard District Court and overlooks the quaint 19th-century mill town.
NEWS
November 3, 1994
The Board of Appeals will decide next month whether a cellular phone company can build a 125-foot communications tower near an Ellicott City middle school.The five-member panel plans tomake its decision during a work session Dec. 6 at 7:30 p.m.The board adjourned early yesterday morning after holding two hearings that attracted dozens of residents fearful of electromagneticradiation from the proposed tower.Cellular One, a subsidiary of Southwestern Bell Mobile Systems Inc., wants to build the tower near Patapsco Middle School on land it leases from First Church of the Nazarene on Rogers Avenue.
NEWS
April 26, 1995
The county Board of Zoning Appeals postponed yesterday a hearing on the Sykesville telecommunications.The board will hear an appeal of the Planning Commission's approval of a site plan for the 200-foot tower at 10:30 a.m. May 25.By that date, the appeal may be moot. The case went to the Carroll County Circuit Court Friday, and Judge Luke K. Burns Jr. expects to make a decision soon. For nearly two years, the issue has pitted neighbors and the town against Cellular One and its contractor, West Shore Communications.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | August 3, 2005
To ease the possible sale of Baltimore's waterfront skyscraper, the World Trade Center, the city is making changes to the building's lease. The Baltimore Development Corp. is asking the Board of Estimates today to change elements of the agreement Baltimore drafted in 1973 when it transferred the prime Inner Harbor property to the state to build the tower. Maryland Department of Transportation officials, who no longer want to manage the 30-story tower, are eager to sell it. BDC Vice President Andrew Frank said the lease changes would allow a World Trade Center buyer to use the property other than as an office building.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun Staff Writer | February 11, 1994
Despite earlier opposition from hundreds of South Carroll residents, the Carroll Board of Zoning Appeals yesterday approved a variance to allow a cellular phone company to build a controversial 200-foot telecommunications tower in Sykesville."
NEWS
By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,Sun reporter | January 2, 2007
A development plan that includes a tower to rival the city's tallest skyscrapers could mean the demolition of yet another vestige of downtown's historic architecture. Setting up what would be downtown Baltimore's third preservation face-off in less than a year, a Washington-area development team is in early talks with the city about building a mixed-use project near the end of the Jones Falls Expressway, including a tower that could rise as high as 60 stories. To make that happen, the developers would need to raze the Terminal Warehouse, an unimposing brick edifice that has stood on the Guilford Avenue site since 1894 - and has been listed on the National Register of Historic Places since 1975.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | August 3, 2005
To ease the possible sale of Baltimore's waterfront skyscraper, the World Trade Center, the city is making changes to the building's lease. The Baltimore Development Corp. is asking the Board of Estimates today to change elements of the agreement Baltimore drafted in 1973 when it transferred the prime Inner Harbor property to the state to build the tower. Maryland Department of Transportation officials, who no longer want to manage the 30-story tower, are eager to sell it. BDC Vice President Andrew Frank said the lease changes would allow a World Trade Center buyer to use the property other than as an office building.
BUSINESS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,SUN STAFF | June 21, 2002
A high-profile gap on Pratt Street in the Inner Harbor will remain a gap a while longer after the developers of a 12-story office building at the proposed Lockwood Place missed their March deadline to break ground and acknowledged that they are rethinking the timing of the project. Lockwood Place, an $84 million project on the downtown campus of Baltimore City Community College, was announced in 1998 and was supposed to include an office tower, retail shops and a parking garage for more than 900 cars.
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,SUN STAFF | April 17, 2002
Carroll County Planning Commission approved yesterday the construction plan for a 192-foot cell phone tower at Baugher's Orchard near Westminster over the objections of neighbors who say the tower would obstruct air traffic from nearby Carroll County Regional Airport. Commission members opted not to address airport safety issues, saying those issues had been dealt with by the Federal Aviation Administration and at hearings before the county Board of Zoning Appeals and several appeals courts.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | September 28, 2001
Ending a seven-month wait, the Federal Communications Commission decided yesterday to allow a 340-foot-high emergency radio tower just outside historic Ellicott City - an announcement that relieved Howard County officials and dismayed neighbors. The tower - a key part of an upgrade to the county's public safety communications system - attracted controversy as soon as local officials announced the site, which is next to Howard District Court and overlooks the quaint 19th-century mill town.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | September 28, 2001
Ending a seven-month wait, the Federal Communications Commission decided yesterday to allow a 340-foot-high emergency radio tower just outside historic Ellicott City -- an announcement that relieved Howard County officials and dismayed neighbors. The tower -- a key part of an upgrade to the county's public safety communications system -- attracted controversy as soon as local officials announced the site, which is next to Howard District Court and overlooks the quaint 19th-century mill town.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Staff Writer | December 15, 1993
What began as a small neighborhood group opposed to a proposed telecommunications tower has become the Piney Run Neighborhood Action Committee with a position statement, a legal fund, a petition drive and a letter-writing campaign."
BUSINESS
By Edward Gunts | March 6, 1991
Despite recent layoffs that have reduced its Baltimore staff from 375 to about 300 and its worldwide staff from 700 to 600, Baltimore's largest architecture firm is still committed to move its headquarters from 400 E. Pratt St. to the Commerce Place office tower under construction at South and Baltimore streets.Harold Adams, chairman of RTKL Associates, said the firm is contractually obligated to move into the 30-story building, where it has leased about 100,000 square feet of space. If RTKL does not need all that space as a result of staff reductions, it could end up subleasing some of it to other tenants, Mr. Adams said.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | February 25, 2001
Federal Communications Commission officials said they will quickly decide whether a 340-foot-high government radio tower can be built overlooking historic Ellicott City, but added they have set no deadline for the decision. The promise of quick action came after a three-hour airing of the issue Friday at the George Howard Building, across the street from the District Court site where state and Howard County officials want the tower built. Anne Marie Wypijewski and Frank Stillwell, FCC attorneys, said they could not estimate when a decision on issuing a permit to build the tower will be reached.
NEWS
By Ellie Baublitz and Ellie Baublitz,SUN STAFF | January 24, 2001
County public safety officials plan to move forward with a new tower in Lineboro and will tap the expertise of state agencies to choose a site that will eliminate a gap in emergency communications. Buddy Redman, director of public safety, plans to meet next week with officials from the Maryland Institute for Emergency Medical Services and the state Department of Management and Budget's General Services to revisit prospective sites for the tower. The agencies have surveyed sites in Carroll County and southern Pennsylvania.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.