Advertisement
HomeCollectionsBuild A School
IN THE NEWS

Build A School

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Kerry O'Rourke and Kerry O'Rourke,Sun Staff Writer | February 24, 1995
The Carroll County Commissioners and county school board members agreed yesterday to continue studying how to build schools quicker without sacrificing quality -- including allowing developers to build them."
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Gregory E. Thornton | August 25, 2014
Editor's note: This op-ed has been updated to correct the number of chronically absent city students.  As the new school year starts in Baltimore City, I want to express my gratitude for the opportunity to build on the work that has been done in the past, and lead the school district and its students and families on the journey to excellence. I applaud the Baltimore City Board of School Commissioners, elected officials at every level of government, and our school families and communities for their staunch support of city schools throughout the education reform process in Baltimore.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,Sun Staff Writer | January 5, 1995
County school officials are getting a history lesson as they plan for the future of Elmer Wolfe Elementary School in Union Bridge.The historical significance of the school building will determine whether the county renovates it or razes it to build a new school.County school officials want to demolish the Elmer Wolfe building and are seeking additional state money for the construction of a new school.But the Maryland Historical Trust has not approved the demolition. The agency's approval is required to destroy any building that is more than 50 years old if the project is to receive state money.
NEWS
August 4, 2011
There is ample evidence that Baltimore County's school board has been failing to do its job of representing the community and holding the superintendent accountable. In just the last few years, we've had the debacle of an overheated Ridgely Middle School, ethics questions surrounding the system's use of a former top administrator's proprietary grading system and software, no-bid contracts with a firm run by a former colleague of Superintendent Joe A. Hairston, the uproar over the system's sudden crackdown on outside groups using the schools for fundraising, and the district's decision to fill administrative jobs instead of classroom positions.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller and Nicole Fuller,nicole.fuller@baltsun.com | December 18, 2008
The Anne Arundel County Council has rejected a settlement that would have relieved the county of a $3 million lawsuit, but at the same time would have eased zoning laws and allowed a church to build a school on an environmentally sensitive plot of land. The County Council voted unanimously during Monday night's meeting against a measure that would have relaxed zoning laws to allow Riverdale Baptist Church to build a school on a 57-acre tract near the Jug Bay Wetlands in Lothian. By refusing the settlement, which called for church leaders to drop their lawsuit claiming religious discrimination and the county to pay as much as $300,000, the county now will have to contend with the consequences of a potentially multimillion-dollar lawsuit.
NEWS
By Gina Davis and Gina Davis,Sun reporter | May 12, 2008
It was during a meeting in mid-December with Baltimore County school officials on Towson's crowded elementary schools that Cathi Forbes realized she needed to do more than sit across the table and hope they'd do the right thing. The passion in her voice rose last week as she recalled the moment when school officials told her and a handful of other community members at the meeting that they were banking on a plan to build a school in Mays Chapel to alleviate the crowding that was forcing more students into portable classrooms each year.
NEWS
By Jonathan D. Rockoff and Jonathan D. Rockoff,SUN STAFF | April 8, 2003
Baltimore County school officials have drawn up a tentative plan for easing crowding at New Town Elementary School in Owings Mills next school year, but parents complain it won't help much. The plan, which has circulated among parents, would move as many as 160 pupils, including two classes of children who are emotionally disturbed, to other schools. But parents, using school system estimates, complain that 100 new pupils would enroll at New Town Elementary because officials also would remove a cap on new enrollments that was imposed this school year.
NEWS
By David Marks and Laurie Taylor-Mitchell | June 5, 2008
Baltimore County has some of the best schools in Maryland. Newsweek recently recognized 10 county high schools as among the top 5 percent in the United States. Unfortunately, there are challenges on the horizon that undermine the strength of our schools and the vitality of our communities. School overcrowding is the most serious of these challenges. The debate over whether to build an addition at Loch Raven High School is the culmination of nearly a decade of frustration with the way Baltimore County plans and builds its schools.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,SUN STAFF | March 29, 1996
Westminster West Middle School students will not have to transfer to Northwest Middle School in Taneytown.It was the redistricting proposal no one seemed to want, and Carroll's school board voted it down Wednesday, earlier than scheduled, to remove it from consideration."
NEWS
By Tanika White and Tanika White,SUN STAFF | November 22, 2000
Responding to community concerns about children's health and safety, the Howard County Board of Education voted unanimously last night not to build an elementary school near the former New Cut landfill in Ellicott City. Board members said that it would not be "prudent" to build a school there, "given the adverse public perception" voiced over the last several months after the board first approved the site as a potential location. The 30-acre site is owned partly by the county and partly by Bruce T. Taylor, who donated a portion of his property for a school this spring.
NEWS
By Nicole Fuller and Nicole Fuller,nicole.fuller@baltsun.com | December 18, 2008
The Anne Arundel County Council has rejected a settlement that would have relieved the county of a $3 million lawsuit, but at the same time would have eased zoning laws and allowed a church to build a school on an environmentally sensitive plot of land. The County Council voted unanimously during Monday night's meeting against a measure that would have relaxed zoning laws to allow Riverdale Baptist Church to build a school on a 57-acre tract near the Jug Bay Wetlands in Lothian. By refusing the settlement, which called for church leaders to drop their lawsuit claiming religious discrimination and the county to pay as much as $300,000, the county now will have to contend with the consequences of a potentially multimillion-dollar lawsuit.
NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin | October 26, 2008
In separate book clubs, Angie Jones and Martha Banghart read the book Three Cups of Tea: One Man's Mission to Promote Peace...One School at a Time. In the book, Greg Mortenson, co-writer with David Oliver Relin, gives a detailed account of his failed attempt to climb to the top of K2, the world's second-highest mountain. But then he succeeds in building schools in some of the most remote regions of Afghanistan and Pakistan. Jones and Banghart, who serve as choral directors in the county's public school system, were so touched by the book they were inspired to do something to help.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie and Liz Bowie,Sun reporter | July 27, 2008
A summer journey to India for three girls from an inner-city Baltimore school began simply, in an after-school club that devoted itself to helping other people. The club at Baltimore Talent Development High School raised money to buy mittens for preschoolers in a nearby Head Start program. Christin Morris, Indigo McMillian and LaKeisha Johnson liked the surprised expression on the children's faces when they opened up the gift bags at Christmas. "I like helping people. It feels good to give back," said Christin, 15. From there they moved on to corresponding with students in Kenya by creating a scrapbook of their lives illustrated by photographs.
NEWS
By David Marks and Laurie Taylor-Mitchell | June 5, 2008
Baltimore County has some of the best schools in Maryland. Newsweek recently recognized 10 county high schools as among the top 5 percent in the United States. Unfortunately, there are challenges on the horizon that undermine the strength of our schools and the vitality of our communities. School overcrowding is the most serious of these challenges. The debate over whether to build an addition at Loch Raven High School is the culmination of nearly a decade of frustration with the way Baltimore County plans and builds its schools.
NEWS
By Gina Davis and Gina Davis,Sun reporter | May 12, 2008
It was during a meeting in mid-December with Baltimore County school officials on Towson's crowded elementary schools that Cathi Forbes realized she needed to do more than sit across the table and hope they'd do the right thing. The passion in her voice rose last week as she recalled the moment when school officials told her and a handful of other community members at the meeting that they were banking on a plan to build a school in Mays Chapel to alleviate the crowding that was forcing more students into portable classrooms each year.
NEWS
By John-John Williams IV and John-John Williams IV,Sun reporter | April 13, 2008
The Howard County Board of Education has voted in favor of a $57 million construction plan to enlarge and renovate Mount Hebron High School. The plan would add eight classrooms, increase the building by 60,000 square feet, expand the width of most hallways in the school to at least 10 feet and add 523 square feet to the 9,195-quare-foot cafeteria. Although a few more details have to be worked out, the schematic design approved Thursday night is very close -- 90 percent to 95 percent -- to the way the school will be built, according to Ken Roey, executive director of facilities and management for the system.
NEWS
By Tanya Jones and Tanya Jones,SUN STAFF | October 1, 1995
Some Abingdon Elementary School students could be attending other, less-crowded elementary schools in that area next school year if a plan for redistricting suggested by the superintendent moves forward.Abingdon Elementary, 3 years old, is more than 200 students over capacity, and seven portable classrooms sit on soccer fields behind the school to house the overflow.If redistricting is approved, students probably will attend William Paca/Old Post Road, Edgewood, Emmorton or William S. James elementary schools, said Donald R. Morrison, spokesman for the school system.
NEWS
By Carol L. Bowers and Carol L. Bowers,SUN STAFF | October 27, 1995
If $650,000 is what it takes for the new Park Elementary School to hold all the students that will be assigned there when it opens in September, then the county school board should spend it, according to Brooklyn Park parents.Parents say they are outraged that the new school has been designed to hold 450 students instead of 600 as promised. And with 550 students expected to be enrolled there come September, about 100 students will be left without seats.Last night, the parents met with school planners to discuss several options:* Add four more classrooms at a cost of $650,000 to the building now under construction.
NEWS
By TRUDY RUBIN | January 15, 2008
Pakistan has made news lately as the world's most dangerous country: a nuclear-armed state that has become a base for al-Qaida, the Taliban and other fanatic Islamists. But on my trip there last month, I saw a route out of this trap - if Pakistan's government and the West would only seize it. I traveled to mountain villages with Greg Mortenson, a former mountain climber who has built 55 schools in Pakistan and eight in Afghanistan. Mr. Mortenson got lost 15 years ago descending from K-2, and promised to build a school for the villagers who rescued and nursed him. After building his first school, Mr. Mortenson set up the Central Asia Institute to build schools in Pakistan's most remote areas, where the government fails to provide education.
NEWS
October 26, 2007
School to buy 22 acres at Rosewood for building The Shoshana S. Cardin School plans to pay the state $550,000 for a 22-acre parcel to build a school on the Rosewood property in Owings Mills, school officials said yesterday. The school, which officials said is the only independent Jewish high school in the Baltimore area, recently reached an agreement with The Associated: Jewish Community Federation of Baltimore to acquire the organization's right to buy the land, said Howard A. Janet, chairman of Cardin's board of trustees.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.