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Bugsy Siegel

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By Jeanne Dugan Cooper and Jeanne Dugan Cooper,Newsday | March 17, 1995
It may not have Wayne Newton, neon signs, smoke-hazed rooms or feathery showgirls. But the first virtual casino is about to open in cyberspace with high-stakes bets, clanging slot machines and kitschy appearances by stars.When Online Offshore Casino and Sports Book opens in May, even people in states where casino gambling is illegal would be able to sit at home and wager $500 on a hand of blackjack or run up credit card bills on bingo or baccarat.Warren Eugene, the offshore gaming operator who unveiled the virtual casino Wednesday, calls himself the Bugsy Siegel of the Internet.
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By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,SUN STAFF | August 22, 2000
This is the fourth in a series of reports from locations named Baltimore. Upon landing on Mars (116 degrees and the only sign of life, a strip of hotel creatures with neon fangs), the first order of business is to upgrade the rental car. A white Chrysler convertible is made available by an Avis woman. "Your first time in Las Vegas?" she asks. You bet. Somewhere in Las Vegas there is a Baltimore Avenue - somewhere off The Strip, in the older part of town, where tourists wander not. Where, perhaps, there's nothing left to lose?
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By TRB | January 16, 1992
Washington -- Oliver Stone is in the doghouse over his movie, ''JFK.'' He stands accused of trashing history; of glorifying a dangerous lunatic, New Orleans prosecutor Jim Garrison; and of polluting the minds of a generation too young to remember the real events. His message: America is controlled by a vast conspiracy in the government and media, of which Lee Harvey Oswald was just a minor player and possibly an innocent dupe.But the problem goes far beyond Oliver Stone. He is just a minor player, and possibly an innocent dupe, of a conspiracy to twist the truth that includes virtually all of Hollywood.
FEATURES
By Jeanne Dugan Cooper and Jeanne Dugan Cooper,Newsday | March 17, 1995
It may not have Wayne Newton, neon signs, smoke-hazed rooms or feathery showgirls. But the first virtual casino is about to open in cyberspace with high-stakes bets, clanging slot machines and kitschy appearances by stars.When Online Offshore Casino and Sports Book opens in May, even people in states where casino gambling is illegal would be able to sit at home and wager $500 on a hand of blackjack or run up credit card bills on bingo or baccarat.Warren Eugene, the offshore gaming operator who unveiled the virtual casino Wednesday, calls himself the Bugsy Siegel of the Internet.
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone | December 20, 1991
Hollywood is into a gangster-film cycle. We seem to be getting one a week, and none, until now, has been that good.The newest, "Bugsy," is very good. It is the story of Bugsy Siegel, the gangster who had Hollywood cowering back in the '40s. He had somehow managed to control the craft unions and was blackmailing the studios until someone shot him dead at his girlfriend's home.Baltimore's Barry Levinson, who directed the film, doesn't concern himself with the studio business. All he is interested in is Bugsy's beginnings in New York, then his move to the West Coast where he picked up with Virginia Hill, a Hollywood starlet.
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By J. Wynn Rousuck | December 21, 1991
THEATERDickens for adults In case you thought "A Christmas Carol" was all syrupy sentimentality, pay a visit to the Spotlighters Theatre, 817 St. Paul St., where New Century Theater is reprising its 1990 production of "Scrooge." This stage version of Leslie Bricusse's 1970 movie musical is proof positive that Dickens is not just for kids. Mark Redfield plays the gnarled, malevolent title character; Bob Tull is the understanding but overworked Bob Cratchit; and Brian P. Chetelat, who also directed, is a Bacchus-like Spirit of Christmas Present.
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By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | December 15, 1991
New York -- When is this guy going to fail? This success stuff is really getting boring. He just keeps churning out the hits. Where's the drama? Where's the giddy existential edge of doom, the bold streak of self-loathing?But no. Clumpa-clumpa, another hit. Maybe not so big a hit and then again maybe a really big hit. But very quietly, "Bugsy" is looking like it'll be another one.Or can he at least get an entourage? Say, 20 guys in Armani suits and nuclear mousse who run around saying, "Barry can't see you now" and laugh oh-so-loudly at the boss' excellent jokes and hover obediently to add fresh cubes to his Pellegrino and point out to everybody how brilliant he is?
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By Lou Cedrone and Lou Cedrone,Evening Sun Staff | April 5, 1991
Something definitely went wrong with ''The Marrying Man.'' Neil Simon, who did the script, has written some reasonably heavy material, but this one plays more like tragedy than comedy, and it was apparently intended to be a mix.There are a few good laughs in the film, but ''Marrying Man'' should be funnier than it is. It frequently promises to be funny, but the tone is wrong. Most of what goes on here is leaden rather than light.It could be that the off-screen business affected what was going on on screen.
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By Rob Hiaasen and Rob Hiaasen,SUN STAFF | August 22, 2000
This is the fourth in a series of reports from locations named Baltimore. Upon landing on Mars (116 degrees and the only sign of life, a strip of hotel creatures with neon fangs), the first order of business is to upgrade the rental car. A white Chrysler convertible is made available by an Avis woman. "Your first time in Las Vegas?" she asks. You bet. Somewhere in Las Vegas there is a Baltimore Avenue - somewhere off The Strip, in the older part of town, where tourists wander not. Where, perhaps, there's nothing left to lose?
FEATURES
By New York Daily News | February 2, 1992
LAS VEGAS -- Warren Beatty has brought stylish gangster Bugsy Siegel back to life in "Bugsy," a movie about the ex-hood's dream of starting "a gambling Garden of Eden in the desert." But even Bugsy would have trouble recognizing the gambling mecca he launched in 1946.For further information on Las Vegas, call (702) 735-3611.
NEWS
By TRB | January 16, 1992
Washington -- Oliver Stone is in the doghouse over his movie, ''JFK.'' He stands accused of trashing history; of glorifying a dangerous lunatic, New Orleans prosecutor Jim Garrison; and of polluting the minds of a generation too young to remember the real events. His message: America is controlled by a vast conspiracy in the government and media, of which Lee Harvey Oswald was just a minor player and possibly an innocent dupe.But the problem goes far beyond Oliver Stone. He is just a minor player, and possibly an innocent dupe, of a conspiracy to twist the truth that includes virtually all of Hollywood.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck | December 21, 1991
THEATERDickens for adults In case you thought "A Christmas Carol" was all syrupy sentimentality, pay a visit to the Spotlighters Theatre, 817 St. Paul St., where New Century Theater is reprising its 1990 production of "Scrooge." This stage version of Leslie Bricusse's 1970 movie musical is proof positive that Dickens is not just for kids. Mark Redfield plays the gnarled, malevolent title character; Bob Tull is the understanding but overworked Bob Cratchit; and Brian P. Chetelat, who also directed, is a Bacchus-like Spirit of Christmas Present.
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone | December 20, 1991
Hollywood is into a gangster-film cycle. We seem to be getting one a week, and none, until now, has been that good.The newest, "Bugsy," is very good. It is the story of Bugsy Siegel, the gangster who had Hollywood cowering back in the '40s. He had somehow managed to control the craft unions and was blackmailing the studios until someone shot him dead at his girlfriend's home.Baltimore's Barry Levinson, who directed the film, doesn't concern himself with the studio business. All he is interested in is Bugsy's beginnings in New York, then his move to the West Coast where he picked up with Virginia Hill, a Hollywood starlet.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Sun Film Critic | December 15, 1991
New York -- When is this guy going to fail? This success stuff is really getting boring. He just keeps churning out the hits. Where's the drama? Where's the giddy existential edge of doom, the bold streak of self-loathing?But no. Clumpa-clumpa, another hit. Maybe not so big a hit and then again maybe a really big hit. But very quietly, "Bugsy" is looking like it'll be another one.Or can he at least get an entourage? Say, 20 guys in Armani suits and nuclear mousse who run around saying, "Barry can't see you now" and laugh oh-so-loudly at the boss' excellent jokes and hover obediently to add fresh cubes to his Pellegrino and point out to everybody how brilliant he is?
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone and Lou Cedrone,Evening Sun Staff | April 5, 1991
Something definitely went wrong with ''The Marrying Man.'' Neil Simon, who did the script, has written some reasonably heavy material, but this one plays more like tragedy than comedy, and it was apparently intended to be a mix.There are a few good laughs in the film, but ''Marrying Man'' should be funnier than it is. It frequently promises to be funny, but the tone is wrong. Most of what goes on here is leaden rather than light.It could be that the off-screen business affected what was going on on screen.
FEATURES
February 21, 1992
The five films nominated for best picture in the Academy Awards competition were "JFK," a controversial look at the assassination of President John F. Kennedy; "Beauty and the Beast," the first full-length cartoon feature ever nominated for best picture; "Bugsy," a period drama about gangster Bugsy Siegel; "The Silence of the Lambs," a psychological thriller about a serial killer, and "The Prince of Tides," a drama about a Southern football coach with a...
TRAVEL
By SUN STAFF | December 5, 1999
Sometimes it's the steady march of footsteps that irrevocably changes a place. Other times it's a single man with a vision and a mission who leaves big footprints.In the case of Las Vegas, it is Benjamin "Bugsy" Siegel, whose legacy survives in Nevada's Mojave Desert. The renowned mobster's Flamingo Hotel, which opened in 1946, set Las Vegas on its way to becoming glitter gulch and the fastest-growing American city in the second half of the 20th century.Two events greased the wheels for Siegel's vision -- the legalization of gambling in Nevada in 1931 and the gusher of electricity that began to flow out of Hoover Dam's power plant five years later.
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