Advertisement
HomeCollectionsBugs Bunny
IN THE NEWS

Bugs Bunny

FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
By MILTON KENT | July 21, 1995
With temperatures expected to be lower than last weekend's blast-furnace-like conditions and Artscape in town, it might not be a bad idea to avoid the television, because the weekend pickin's are slim.ABC (Channel 2) brings the third of golf's major tournaments, the British Open, from the Old Course at St. Andrews in Scotland.With Maryland's own Jim McKay still on the mend from May heart surgery, the network has brought in Jack Whitaker, one of the great sports sages, to provide a presence during tomorrow (10 a.m.)
ARTICLES BY DATE
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | November 14, 2003
Looney Tunes: Back In Action proves that cinematic revivals can be done right, with all the spirit of the originals intact, yet with enough of a contemporary feel to fit right into the present day. Like the best of the old Looney Tunes, which gave the world Bugs Bunny, Daffy Duck, Porky Pig, et al., Back In Action is replete with so many wisecracks, puns, double entendres and visual jokes that you almost need a flow chart to keep up with them all. But...
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
By Cox News Service | November 22, 1999
It's amazing that anything with Barney's mug on it still exists. There was a time where the purple dinosaur inspired rage and social backlash. Now, it's the opposite. Barney is back in favor, in part because of cool toys like Barney's Song Magic Bongos ($30). The Magic Bongos plays 11 songs in the voices of five different instruments.All kids have to do is pick their song ("Farmer in the Dell," among others) and an instrument, ranging from a steel drum to a hooting organ sound, and start bonging away.
FEATURES
By John Woestendiek and John Woestendiek,SUN STAFF | November 10, 2003
When the Tasmanian Devil arrived, the first thing Laraine Harford did was carry him to the kitchen. She gingerly removed the cartoon character cookie jar from its box, pulled off his head and began carefully pouring tap water inside, one measuring cup at a time. At 20 cups, she stopped. Big enough, she thought. She smiled with satisfaction. Her two-year quest was over. Harford poured the water out, let Taz air dry and put him back in his carton. She swathed that with bubble wrap, placed the bundle in a clear plastic bin filled with chunks of shipping foam and snapped the top firmly in place, sliding the bin under the table that holds her African violets.
NEWS
By Mark Ribbing and Bill Atkinson and Mark Ribbing and Bill Atkinson,SUN STAFF | January 11, 2000
America Online Inc., the largest Internet-access company in the world, said yesterday that it has agreed to buy news and entertainment giant Time Warner Inc. If the stunning $179.1 billion deal is approved, it will be the biggest corporate acquisition in history. It would also mark the biggest step in the rapid consolidation of the Internet, communications and media industries. The new company, to be called AOL Time Warner Inc., would have 22 million Internet subscribers, $30 billion in revenue and some of the most lucrative and widely recognized icons of American culture, ranging from CNN to Time magazine to Bugs Bunny.
FEATURES
By Julie Lynem and Julie Lynem,Knight-Ridder News Service | May 28, 1993
Remember the days when a dollar bought more than a candy bar and Fred and Wilma were the hottest couple on television? When life was simple and Bugs Bunny was as cool as bell-bottoms?Cartoon characters like the Flintstones, the Jetsons and Bugs were big hits with baby boomers then, and still are. That's why the Deluxe Corp. is targeting boomers with its Stars collection check package, which is available through participating financial institutions.Deluxe is banking on checks featuring cartoon and comic strip characters B. C., Bugs Bunny and Friends, the Flintstones, Ziggy, Garfield, the Jetsons and the Simpsons.
FEATURES
By Chris Kridler and Chris Kridler,SUN STAFF | November 15, 1996
There's no intelligent life out there in "Space Jam." If you get out of the theater and have a little headache, it's because your brain has been deprived of wit for 87 minutes.There are a few genuine laughs and a few scenes of exceptionally nifty animation in this cartoon-meets-live-action basketball flick, along the lines of "Who Framed Roger Rabbit." But there's really no comparison in story, dazzle or -- dare we say it -- acting.Michael Jordan plays himself, or an idealized version of himself, living an idyllic life with his family in a beautiful house after he quits the NBA and starts striking out a lot in minor-league baseball.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | November 14, 2003
Looney Tunes: Back In Action proves that cinematic revivals can be done right, with all the spirit of the originals intact, yet with enough of a contemporary feel to fit right into the present day. Like the best of the old Looney Tunes, which gave the world Bugs Bunny, Daffy Duck, Porky Pig, et al., Back In Action is replete with so many wisecracks, puns, double entendres and visual jokes that you almost need a flow chart to keep up with them all. But...
FEATURES
By Mike Giuliano and Mike Giuliano,Special to The Evening Sun | May 30, 1991
If you thought you saw a "putty tat" at the Baltimore Museum of Art, you did, you did!That's because a noisy bunch of cartoon critters -- among them Tweety, Porky Pig, Bugs Bunny and Road Runner -- have moved into the museum with a touring exhibit opening Sunday, "That's All Folks! Bugs Bunny and Friends Present the Art of Animation."Even as light summer shows go, this one doesn't pretend to do much more than present us with some cartoonish Looney Tunes. So kids will be tickled by all the Warner Bros.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | June 4, 1991
Let us not dwell on the question of whether the Baltimore Museum of Art ought to bring in an exhibit of animated cartoons for 12 weeks, because the answer -- no! -- is simply too obvious. Let us instead consider "That's all Folks!: Bugs Bunny and Friends Present the Art of Animation" (through Aug. 25) strictly on its own terms.Much has been written about the creativity and ingenuity of the Warner Bros. cartoons of the 1930s to the 1960s, the subject of this sprawling show. Steve Schneider, author of the catalog and brochure which accompany it, credits Friz Freleng, Chuck Jones and the other creators of Warner cartoons with giving their works a brashness, irreverence, topicality and sheer speed -- and their characters a multidimensionality -- missing in other products.
SPORTS
By Vito Stellino and Vito Stellino,SUN STAFF | January 26, 2000
ATLANTA -- The podium at the Georgia Dome yesterday was surrounded on three sides by minicams and sportswriters from as far away as Germany. It's the kind of reception the quarterback on a Super Bowl team gets on media day as the hype machine geared up for Sunday's climax to the 1999 NFL season. It's old hat for players like John Elway and Brett Favre. But Kurt Warner? Steve Sabol, head of NFL Films, said the St. Louis Rams quarterback is the greatest story in NFL history. Warner, who played one year in college, was cut by the Green Bay Packers as an undrafted free agent, went to the Arena League and NFL Europe and stocked shelves at a supermarket, is now the starting quarterback in the Super Bowl.
NEWS
By Mark Ribbing and Bill Atkinson and Mark Ribbing and Bill Atkinson,SUN STAFF | January 11, 2000
America Online Inc., the largest Internet-access company in the world, said yesterday that it has agreed to buy news and entertainment giant Time Warner Inc. If the stunning $179.1 billion deal is approved, it will be the biggest corporate acquisition in history. It would also mark the biggest step in the rapid consolidation of the Internet, communications and media industries. The new company, to be called AOL Time Warner Inc., would have 22 million Internet subscribers, $30 billion in revenue and some of the most lucrative and widely recognized icons of American culture, ranging from CNN to Time magazine to Bugs Bunny.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Cox News Service | November 22, 1999
It's amazing that anything with Barney's mug on it still exists. There was a time where the purple dinosaur inspired rage and social backlash. Now, it's the opposite. Barney is back in favor, in part because of cool toys like Barney's Song Magic Bongos ($30). The Magic Bongos plays 11 songs in the voices of five different instruments.All kids have to do is pick their song ("Farmer in the Dell," among others) and an instrument, ranging from a steel drum to a hooting organ sound, and start bonging away.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | July 20, 1997
We went to see "Contact," the Jodie Foster movie, because we heard it would connect us with other worlds. It did, and one of the worlds turned out to be Cable News Network's. CNN's reporters kept making cameo appearances, playing themselves, in a casting attempt to link the outer space story to the real world on Earth. It worked. They linked us to the real world of Bugs Bunny. And of Emmett C. Burns Jr.Burns is the Baltimore County delegate who wants us to think carefully about $21 billion in the Maryland pension system, and how none of it should be invested in companies that make gangsta rap recordings.
FEATURES
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,SUN STAFF | May 31, 1997
Think for a moment of a rabbit.Not just any rabbit. Think of a tall, gray rabbit who wears white gloves and walks around on his hind legs. He is a cocky creature who chomps a carrot the way W. C. Fields bit into his cigars: confidently. He opens every encounter with these smart-alecky words:"What's up, Doc?"Now imagine this cheeky rabbit on a 32-cent U.S. States postage stamp. Does that thought cheer you? Does it make you sick? Do you ask yourself what kind of abomination the U.S. Postal Service will contrive next?
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler | April 6, 1997
They provide stamps of approval; Philately: Postal Service 0) salespersons Phyllis Shipley and Acquinetta Walker know which commemorative issues are the hot tickets.Those splendid monsters Dracula, Frankenstein and the Phantom of the Opera will finally be recognized with their own postage stamps in October, but Phyllis Shipley predicts Bugs Bunny will be the truly big hit of the year.Shipley and Acquinetta Walker cheerily dispense collectible stamps from the philatelic window at the Baltimore Post Office, and they have a wealth of experience in forecasting hot items.
FEATURES
By Lou Cedrone | February 12, 1991
When German producer Dieter Geissler did his ''NeverEnding Story'' in 1984, he was happy to arrange advance screenings. That was because he knew he had a winner.The sequel, ''NeverEnding Story II, The Next Chapter,'' was given no local advance showings, and for good reason. The new movie is a loser, and Geissler may know that. The original film, based on a portion of the book, written in 1979 by Michael Ende, was done in Canada and Germany. It included a lot of air time for Bastian and Falkor, his flying luckdragon.
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler | April 6, 1997
They provide stamps of approval; Philately: Postal Service 0) salespersons Phyllis Shipley and Acquinetta Walker know which commemorative issues are the hot tickets.Those splendid monsters Dracula, Frankenstein and the Phantom of the Opera will finally be recognized with their own postage stamps in October, but Phyllis Shipley predicts Bugs Bunny will be the truly big hit of the year.Shipley and Acquinetta Walker cheerily dispense collectible stamps from the philatelic window at the Baltimore Post Office, and they have a wealth of experience in forecasting hot items.
FEATURES
By Chris Kridler and Chris Kridler,SUN STAFF | November 15, 1996
There's no intelligent life out there in "Space Jam." If you get out of the theater and have a little headache, it's because your brain has been deprived of wit for 87 minutes.There are a few genuine laughs and a few scenes of exceptionally nifty animation in this cartoon-meets-live-action basketball flick, along the lines of "Who Framed Roger Rabbit." But there's really no comparison in story, dazzle or -- dare we say it -- acting.Michael Jordan plays himself, or an idealized version of himself, living an idyllic life with his family in a beautiful house after he quits the NBA and starts striking out a lot in minor-league baseball.
FEATURES
By SUSAN REIMER | December 10, 1995
MY CHILDREN were sitting motionless. For a moment, I thought they had turned to stone for the rude things they say to each other -- as I have often predicted they would -- but then I realized they were watching cartoons.Not cartoons du jour, such as "X-Men" or "Aladdin," but the antique ones. Bugs Bunny and Elmer Fudd. Tom and Jerry. Yogi and Boo-Boo. The Jetsons. Popeye. Roadrunner. The ones we watched as kids.These cartoons looked so good on the TV screen -- not gray and grainy the way I remembered them -- that I thought Ted Turner had purchased them all, colorized them, remixed the sound and added long-lost footage.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.