Advertisement
HomeCollectionsBugle
IN THE NEWS

Bugle

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By WAYNE HARDIN | July 24, 1994
There still might be a ballpark down there.Beneath the tons of dirt and landfill that rise up into a great flat hill off Old Annapolis Road once sat Westport Stadium, a baseball park where Negro League teams played."
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | September 1, 2012
As the giant silver bell of a bugle reflected City Dock, the man who suggested The World Championships of Drum Corps move to Annapolis considered the impact beyond an estimated $10 million and 13,000 visitors. "How big a deal is it? It's important enough to bring a corps back from the grave," said Jeff Weir, director of the Naval Academy's Drum & Bugle Corps. "If the World Championships are in your backyard," Weir said, "Well, it's almost like having the Super Bowl in Baltimore.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | May 6, 2009
Kenneth David Mitchell, a retired office manager and World War II veteran, died Friday at a nursing home in Davis, Calif. The former longtime Idlewylde resident was 88. Mr. Mitchell, who had moved to Davis five weeks ago, was born in Kelso, Wash. When he was an infant, he moved with his family to Mannasota Avenue in Northeast Baltimore. He was a 1938 graduate of City College and attended Western Maryland College, now McDaniel College. During World War II, he enlisted in the Army Air Forces and served with the 5th Air Force in Italy as a bombardier and navigator aboard B-24 Liberator bombers.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | May 13, 2010
When it comes to music at the Preakness, there's only one tune that really means anything. And Sam the Bugler is ready to play it. The tune is known as the "Call to the Post," or "First Call." It's the rousing fanfare that precedes every horse race by about 10 minutes, a bugle call that lets everyone know that hoofs are about to start flying. Sam, who works full time, bugle in tow, for the New York State Racing Association, has made a living off of it for 18 years, sounding the call at Belmont Park, Aqueduct and Saratoga racetracks.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | May 13, 2010
When it comes to music at the Preakness, there's only one tune that really means anything. And Sam the Bugler is ready to play it. The tune is known as the "Call to the Post," or "First Call." It's the rousing fanfare that precedes every horse race by about 10 minutes, a bugle call that lets everyone know that hoofs are about to start flying. Sam, who works full time, bugle in tow, for the New York State Racing Association, has made a living off of it for 18 years, sounding the call at Belmont Park, Aqueduct and Saratoga racetracks.
NEWS
November 5, 2006
Son of the late Carl and Nellie Parsons, LEWIS S. PARSONS was born on December 19, 1927 in Havre De Grace, Maryland. He was educated in the Baltimore City Public Schools and subsequently served in the United States Air Force. Lew, as he was called, began his working career at the tender age of thirteen, working summer vacations and after school hours at Bugle Linen Service, Inc., a subsidiary of Best Manufacturing Company. Bugle Linen was a chain of linen and uniform rental plants with several locations from Maine to Florida as well as in Fort Wayne, Indiana and Los Angeles, California.
NEWS
By Rafael Alvarez and Rafael Alvarez,Staff Writer | October 6, 1992
America's last combat bugler knew it was time to put down his horn when they started booing him at Memorial Stadium.The year was 1985 and the old soldier, celebrated at the 33rd Street ballpark as "Pat the Bugler," was down to his last four teeth.A man who pantomimed taps before John F. Kennedy's horse-drawn casket, roused Oriole fans through six World Series and knew the privilege of playing a cavalry bugle found amid the carnage of Custer's Last Stand at Little Big Horn, he had to concede that it hurt too much to blow.
NEWS
By Erin Cox, The Baltimore Sun | September 1, 2012
As the giant silver bell of a bugle reflected City Dock, the man who suggested The World Championships of Drum Corps move to Annapolis considered the impact beyond an estimated $10 million and 13,000 visitors. "How big a deal is it? It's important enough to bring a corps back from the grave," said Jeff Weir, director of the Naval Academy's Drum & Bugle Corps. "If the World Championships are in your backyard," Weir said, "Well, it's almost like having the Super Bowl in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Linda Linley and Linda Linley,SUN STAFF | May 9, 2002
Only a native would know that the city's name is sometimes pronounced "Bawlmer" or that Bugle Field was where Baltimore's Elite - pronounced e-light - Giants played in the Negro National League. Gordon R. England, 64, the secretary of the Navy, proved conversant in both areas last week when he reminisced about his hometown while visiting his alma mater, Mount St. Joseph High School on Frederick Avenue in Irvington. England, a 1955 Mount St. Joseph graduate, gave a short speech to the junior class at the all-boys Roman Catholic high school, then presented the school with two large inscribed posters.
NEWS
September 18, 2007
When a campaign-finance system encourages presidential candidates to vacuum up as many dollars as they can, as fast as they can, they're bound to end up with some dirty money. This month, the campaign of Democratic front-runner Hillary Rodham Clinton returned $850,000 bundled by a fundraiser after reports revealed he had skipped out on his 1992 sentencing for grand theft. Last week, USA Today reported that the 2008 candidates already had collected perhaps hundreds of donations from minors - a tactic often used by parents to exceed limits for individual contributions.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.Sragow@baltsun.com | October 9, 2009
The Japanese surprise attack on Pearl Harbor takes place only near the end of "From Here to Eternity" (1953). But it's an ideal selection for the Maryland Historical Society's series, "Patriotic Hollywood: World War II in Film." Stephen Ambrose once wrote, "What held [American GIs] together was not country and flag, but unit cohesion." "From Here to Eternity" is about the pain of building that unit cohesion and the rewards it gives to all who join it, be they selfless, selfish or damaged.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | May 6, 2009
Kenneth David Mitchell, a retired office manager and World War II veteran, died Friday at a nursing home in Davis, Calif. The former longtime Idlewylde resident was 88. Mr. Mitchell, who had moved to Davis five weeks ago, was born in Kelso, Wash. When he was an infant, he moved with his family to Mannasota Avenue in Northeast Baltimore. He was a 1938 graduate of City College and attended Western Maryland College, now McDaniel College. During World War II, he enlisted in the Army Air Forces and served with the 5th Air Force in Italy as a bombardier and navigator aboard B-24 Liberator bombers.
NEWS
September 18, 2007
When a campaign-finance system encourages presidential candidates to vacuum up as many dollars as they can, as fast as they can, they're bound to end up with some dirty money. This month, the campaign of Democratic front-runner Hillary Rodham Clinton returned $850,000 bundled by a fundraiser after reports revealed he had skipped out on his 1992 sentencing for grand theft. Last week, USA Today reported that the 2008 candidates already had collected perhaps hundreds of donations from minors - a tactic often used by parents to exceed limits for individual contributions.
NEWS
By Arin Gencer and Arin Gencer,Sun Reporter | June 24, 2007
The booming of bass drums and soaring melodies of horns will fill the stadium at Westminster High School Friday. Instead of appearing as half-time entertainment, the musicians in uniform - considered the young superstars of the marching world - will be the main attraction, as they participate in Music in Motion, a drum corps show. Sponsored by Youth Education in the Arts (YEA!), the show will include seven competing drum corps from Colorado, Illinois and New Hampshire: the Cadets, the Crossmen, the Phantom Regiment, Carolina Crown, the Blue Knights, the Boston Crusaders and the Spartans.
NEWS
November 5, 2006
Son of the late Carl and Nellie Parsons, LEWIS S. PARSONS was born on December 19, 1927 in Havre De Grace, Maryland. He was educated in the Baltimore City Public Schools and subsequently served in the United States Air Force. Lew, as he was called, began his working career at the tender age of thirteen, working summer vacations and after school hours at Bugle Linen Service, Inc., a subsidiary of Best Manufacturing Company. Bugle Linen was a chain of linen and uniform rental plants with several locations from Maine to Florida as well as in Fort Wayne, Indiana and Los Angeles, California.
NEWS
By Jill Stone and Jill Stone,SUN STAFF | June 26, 2005
Youth Education in the Arts (YEA!) and the Westminster High School marching band are sponsoring a drum and bugle corps competition Thursday that will feature seven groups: the Cadets, the Crossmen, Boston Crusaders, Carolina Crown, Jersey Surf, Magic of Orlando and Spirit from Jacksonville State University in Alabama. The event, a fund-raiser for the band that will be held at Westminster High's football field, will also feature clinics for students, said Mark Lortz, a band director at Westminster High.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | May 27, 2001
When you think of films about Pearl Harbor, the movie version of James Jones' novel "From Here to Eternity" may not come immediately to mind. After all, the Japanese surprise attack takes place only near the end of the film. And "From Here to Eternity" is better known as a serious slice of American life: an unblinking look at the pre-war U.S. Army. Moreover, though it was a huge hit and Academy Award-winner, it dates from 1953, when blockbusters could be adult movies. This weekend's new entry, "Pearl Harbor," is instead the unholy progeny of "Saving Private Ryan" and "Titanic."
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.Sragow@baltsun.com | October 9, 2009
The Japanese surprise attack on Pearl Harbor takes place only near the end of "From Here to Eternity" (1953). But it's an ideal selection for the Maryland Historical Society's series, "Patriotic Hollywood: World War II in Film." Stephen Ambrose once wrote, "What held [American GIs] together was not country and flag, but unit cohesion." "From Here to Eternity" is about the pain of building that unit cohesion and the rewards it gives to all who join it, be they selfless, selfish or damaged.
NEWS
By Linda Linley and Linda Linley,SUN STAFF | May 9, 2002
Only a native would know that the city's name is sometimes pronounced "Bawlmer" or that Bugle Field was where Baltimore's Elite - pronounced e-light - Giants played in the Negro National League. Gordon R. England, 64, the secretary of the Navy, proved conversant in both areas last week when he reminisced about his hometown while visiting his alma mater, Mount St. Joseph High School on Frederick Avenue in Irvington. England, a 1955 Mount St. Joseph graduate, gave a short speech to the junior class at the all-boys Roman Catholic high school, then presented the school with two large inscribed posters.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | May 27, 2001
When you think of films about Pearl Harbor, the movie version of James Jones' novel "From Here to Eternity" may not come immediately to mind. After all, the Japanese surprise attack takes place only near the end of the film. And "From Here to Eternity" is better known as a serious slice of American life: an unblinking look at the pre-war U.S. Army. Moreover, though it was a huge hit and Academy Award-winner, it dates from 1953, when blockbusters could be adult movies. This weekend's new entry, "Pearl Harbor," is instead the unholy progeny of "Saving Private Ryan" and "Titanic."
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.