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By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,Evening Sun Staff | December 5, 1991
HERNDON, Va. -- The fallout of defeat has showered Joe Bugel's desert paradise in Arizona this season.In the second year of an ambitious project to turn the Phoenix Cardinals into the Washington Redskins West, Bugel treads water with a 4-9 record.It was bad enough that the Cardinals' head coach lost his starting quarterback before the season began. The situation grew worse with the five-game losing streak the Cardinals take into Sunday's home game against the Redskins.But this week found Bugel defending the organization from an insinuation that Cardinals management restricts individual expression, and that the restriction has hurt the team.
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By Edward Lee and Edward Lee,SUN STAFF | November 26, 2004
ASHBURN, Va. -- With apologies to the Philadelphia Eagles' Jevon Kearse, the Washington Redskins have their own "freak" in offensive lineman Ray Brown. At 6 feet 5 and 318 pounds, Brown is one of the largest players on the Redskins and in the NFL. And he will make the 198th start of his 19-year career against the Steelers (9-1) Sunday at 1 p.m. in Pittsburgh at the ripe age of 41. "I think he's somewhat of a freak, you know what I mean," Redskins assistant head coach of offense Joe Bugel said of the oldest offensive lineman in the league.
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By Don Bosley and Don Bosley,McClatchy News Service | May 24, 1992
SACRAMENTO, Calif. -- Joe Bugel blames himself.He also blames his former Phoenix Cardinals assistants, or anybody else who ever told him that Ivory Lee Brown wasn't ready to carry the ball in the NFL.Since watching Brown throw his 245 pounds around for the San Antonio Riders this spring, Bugel has been kicking himself up and down the NFC East cellar."
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By Jeff Barker and Jeff Barker,SUN STAFF | September 3, 2004
ASHBURN, Va. - In 1982, Joe Bugel, a Washington Redskins offensive coach, wanted to distinguish his beefy linemen from the rest of the team, make them feel significant. He could have bought them ties or taken them to dinner. But this was the NFL, so he gave them T-shirts depicting a nasty-looking razorback and christened his men "The Hogs." The line loved it. Twenty-two years later, Bugel and head coach Joe Gibbs have returned to the Redskins, bent on creating a new line in the image of the old one. Bugel calls the unit the "Dirtbags."
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By Vito Stellino and Vito Stellino,Sun Staff Correspondent | September 28, 1990
HERNDON, Va. -- Coach Joe Bugel will do just about anything to attract Phoenix Cardinals fans to home games, short of driving them to the stadium himself.On second thought, if some fans don't have a way to get to Sun Devil Stadium, Bugel might be available."I'm going to do that [drive fans to the stadium] Sunday," he said jokingly. "I've got my little black hat and bus out front. There's nothing wrong with that. We need that 12th man out there cheering."The problem is that, at times, the Cardinals seem to have only about 12 fans.
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By MIKE LITTWIN | September 10, 1990
WASHINGTON -- Another NFL season opened yesterday without a team in Baltimore (that's seven and counting, for those of you keeping score at home). I hope you didn't let the day get you down. I didn't.No, sir. I went to see the Phoenix Cardinals instead.To watch the Cardinals is to celebrate football-less Sundays. They are the team that parity (if not parody) forgot. I've been told the Cardinals are the principal reason the NFL finally decided games were lasting too long. And now people are suggesting there should be a two-minute warning before any Cardinals game begins.
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By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,Sun Staff Correspondent | December 5, 1991
HERNDON, Va. -- The fallout of defeat has showered Joe Bugel's desert paradise in Arizona this season.In the second year of an ambitious project to turn the Phoenix Cardinals into the Washington Redskins West, Bugel treads water with a 4-9 record.It was bad enough that the Cardinals' head coach lost his starting quarterback before the season began. The situation grew worse with the five-game losing streak the Cardinals take into Sunday's home game against the Redskins.But this week Bugel was defending the organization from an insinuation that Cardinals management restricts individual expression, and that the restriction has hurt the team.
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By Vito Stellino and Vito Stellino,SUN STAFF | September 14, 1997
One of the toughest things an NFL coach has to do is deal with the losses.Joe Bugel flunked that test Monday night.The Oakland Raiders coach, known as one of the good guys in the profession, was so shaken after losing to the Kansas City Chiefs in the final seconds, 28-27, that he stayed in his office and never appeared for the usual postgame news conference.The only Raider who came out of the closed locker room was Albert Lewis.The next day when Bugel did speak, he made things worse."I don't know if I was ever hurt like that.
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By Vito Stellino and Vito Stellino,Staff Writer | October 17, 1993
TEMPE, Ariz. -- Call it the Protege Bowl.When the Phoenix Cardinals play host to the Washington Redskins today, one of Joe Gibbs' former assistants will get a victory -- unless the game ends in a tie.Unfortunately, for Richie Petitbon, the Redskins' coach, or Joe Bugel, the Cardinals' coach, it'll be only the second victory of the season.Petitbon and Bugel, both struggling at 1-4, are proving that being part of a successful program as an assistant coach is no guarantee of success as a head coach.
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By Vito Stellino and Vito Stellino,Staff Writer | September 12, 1993
WASHINGTON -- The numbers tell a grim story for the Phoenix Cardinals today.They come into RFK Stadium, a place where they've lost 14 straight games, to face a Washington Redskins team that is 20-2 in Sunday games coming off Monday night games.Want more?The Redskins have beaten the Cardinals 15 of the past 17 meetings, and Phoenix coach Joe Bugel, a former Redskins assistant, has yet to see his team score a touchdown in RFK Stadium while losing three games by a combined score of 106-3.Want more?
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By Jeff Barker and Jeff Barker,SUN STAFF | August 5, 2004
ASHBURN, Va. - "We're putting the band back together," says a gritty John Belushi in the 1980 film The Blues Brothers. He's referring to Jake, Elwood, "Blue Lou," "Mr. Fabulous" and "Bones" Malone. But it might well be Joe Gibbs, 63, talking about reuniting his Washington Redskins coaching gang of Joe Bugel, 64, Don Breaux, 64, Rennie Simmons, 62, and Jack Burns, 55. Along with Ernie Zampese - who at 68 is in his first go-round with the team - the Gibbs group reintroduces one of the NFL's most storied coaching staffs.
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By Vito Stellino and Vito Stellino,SUN STAFF | September 14, 1997
One of the toughest things an NFL coach has to do is deal with the losses.Joe Bugel flunked that test Monday night.The Oakland Raiders coach, known as one of the good guys in the profession, was so shaken after losing to the Kansas City Chiefs in the final seconds, 28-27, that he stayed in his office and never appeared for the usual postgame news conference.The only Raider who came out of the closed locker room was Albert Lewis.The next day when Bugel did speak, he made things worse."I don't know if I was ever hurt like that.
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By JOHN EISENBERG | February 16, 1996
Don Shula didn't want the job. Ted Marchibroda did. Who was next on Art Modell's list, Howard Schnellenberger? Weeb Ewbank?Obviously, it hasn't taken Modell long to understand that the past sells in Baltimore. Hey, do you think Jim Speros clued him in before leaving for Quebec? Un moment, monsieur Art?Not that Marchibroda's hiring is the kind of eye-popping stunner that will cause hundreds of fans to give in and plunk down that stinkin' PSL money. It is a conservative choice for a new head coach.
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By Mike Preston and Mike Preston,SUN STAFF | February 12, 1996
Baltimore NFL owner Art Modell said yesterday that he plans to have his front-office staff completed within 10 days, including decisions made on the status of coach Bill Belichick and a possible front-office position for former Miami coach Don Shula.Modell said his timetable isn't definite, but he wants to move ahead in timely fashion."I want to do it the right way," said Modell. "We have to get the ball rolling. I'll get opinions, meet with my key people, then make the ultimate decisions."
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By Steve Schoenfeld and Steve Schoenfeld,Arizona Republic | February 4, 1994
PHOENIX, Ariz. -- Nice Guys are out. Buddy Ball is in.Buddy Ryan ball.Ryan, the Houston Oilers defensive coordinator, was hired as coach and general manager of the Phoenix Cardinals yesterday, a move that sent shock waves through the NFL."Does Bill Bidwill know what he did?" one NFL executive said.What the Cardinals owner did was replace Joe Bugel, Mr. Nice Guy, with one of the league's most controversial coaches, James David "Buddy" Ryan, who signed a four-year contract for close to $500,000 a year.
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By VITO STELLINO | January 2, 1994
Joe Bugel and Jerry Glanville roomed together in a log cabin back in 1967 when they were assistant coaches at Western Kentucky.They drew up plays on the back of pizza boxes and dreamed of bigger things ahead.They eventually went on to become NFL head coaches, and their paths will cross again today in a meaningless season finale at the Georgia Dome.Their teams -- Bugel's Phoenix Cardinals and Glanville's Atlanta Falcons -- are both 6-9 and there's only one thing at stake -- their jobs.In a year in which there's not likely to be much coaching turnover in the NFL, Bugel and Glanville are at the top of the list of coaches who have to worry about job security.
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By VITO STELLINO | January 2, 1994
Joe Bugel and Jerry Glanville roomed together in a log cabin back in 1967 when they were assistant coaches at Western Kentucky.They drew up plays on the back of pizza boxes and dreamed of bigger things ahead.They eventually went on to become NFL head coaches, and their paths will cross again today in a meaningless season finale at the Georgia Dome.Their teams -- Bugel's Phoenix Cardinals and Glanville's Atlanta Falcons -- are both 6-9 and there's only one thing at stake -- their jobs.In a year in which there's not likely to be much coaching turnover in the NFL, Bugel and Glanville are at the top of the list of coaches who have to worry about job security.
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By Vito Stellino and Vito Stellino,Staff Writer | October 2, 1992
ASHBURN, Va. -- Wide receiver Gary Clark still has fond memories of the days when Joe Bugel was Boss Hog of the Washington Redskins.Bugel was officially the offensive line coach, but, as Clark puts it, "he coached everybody."Bugel was quick to speak up when he didn't think the player met his standards."He called me so many names," Clark said. "He's my kind of guy. One time, he called me a gutless c . [I said], 'You can call me a c ,but don't call me gutless.' That's one thing I'm not," Clark said.
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December 20, 1993
Why not build it 50 miles south?Philadelphia Eagles owner Norman Braman announced plans last night to build a 70,000-seat, football-only stadium with a grass playing field that would open for the 1996-97 season.Braman said he would finance construction of Eagles Stadium. He said he had hired Brookwood Corp. of Atlanta to study the feasibility of building it.Construction would begin in January 1995 at one of two sites in South Philadelphia, near the Eagles' current playing field, Veterans Stadium, Braman said.
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By Vito Stellino and Vito Stellino,Staff Writer | October 17, 1993
TEMPE, Ariz. -- Call it the Protege Bowl.When the Phoenix Cardinals play host to the Washington Redskins today, one of Joe Gibbs' former assistants will get a victory -- unless the game ends in a tie.Unfortunately, for Richie Petitbon, the Redskins' coach, or Joe Bugel, the Cardinals' coach, it'll be only the second victory of the season.Petitbon and Bugel, both struggling at 1-4, are proving that being part of a successful program as an assistant coach is no guarantee of success as a head coach.
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