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By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,SUN REPORTER | April 29, 2007
It was strictly sibling revelry at the 111th running of the Maryland Hunt Cup yesterday in Glyndon. In his first trip around the demanding four-mile course, Stewart Strawbridge impressively guided The Bruce to a three-length victory for the trainer, half-sister Sanna Hendriks, who was so thrilled she fumbled the trophy on the winner's stand after the race. Owned by Strawbridge and bred in New Zealand, The Bruce basically accomplished the chore by running on the front end, several times turning back challengers and finishing strongly to beat defending champion Bug River and Lear Charm, who wound up in a dead heat for second.
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By Todd Karpovich and Todd Karpovich,Special to The Sun | April 29, 2008
Because of an editing error, Sunday's article on the Maryland Hunt Cup ended in the middle of a sentence. Here is the complete article. There is little doubt among those affiliated with Maryland steeplechasing that Charles Fenwick III has the sport in his blood. His father, Charles Fenwick Jr., is a five-time winner of the Maryland Hunt Cup and his mother, Ann D. Stewart, won the race three times as a trainer. On Saturday, in the 112th running of the Maryland Hunt Cup, Charles Fenwick III added to the family's legacy by winning the $75,000 race in front of an announced 7,500.
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SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,SUN REPORTER | April 28, 2007
The state's major spring steeplechase season concludes today with the 111th running of the prestigious Maryland Hunt Cup in Glyndon. And entering the $75,000 race, the story is as much about a jumper who isn't competing and one who hasn't competed well this spring, as it is about those who might contend at the four-mile, 22-obstacle course. Bubble Economy, last weekend's Grand National winner, will not run, so a newly offered $30,000 bonus to the winner of both races will go unclaimed.
SPORTS
By Todd Karpovich and Todd Karpovich,Special to The Sun | April 27, 2008
There is little doubt among those affiliated with Maryland steeplechasing that Charles Fenwick III has the sport in his blood. His father, Charles Fenwick Jr., is a five-time winner of the Maryland Hunt Cup and his mother, Ann D. Stewart, won the race three times as a trainer. Yesterday at the 112th running of the Maryland Hunt Cup, Charles Fenwick III added to the family's legacy by winning the $75,000 race in front of an announced 7,500. All those years of training with his parents paid off as Fenwick and his mount, Askim, who is trained by Stewart, held off a late surge by Coal Dust and won the race by a length.
SPORTS
By KENT BAKER and KENT BAKER,SUN REPORTER | April 30, 2006
Bug River demolished all the doubts yesterday. Concerns about his fitness, willingness and a new jockey were all removed in slightly more than nine minutes when the 13-year-old son of Polish Numbers staved off a determined bid by Rosbrian to capture the $75,000 Maryland Hunt Cup by a neck on a gorgeous day in Glyndon. Through the stretch drive, they were the lone survivors in a seven-horse field which confronted the grueling four-mile, 22-jump course and they staged a thrilling finish before Bug River clinched his second Hunt Cup victory in the past three years.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee and Sandra McKee,SUN STAFF | April 25, 2004
Nearly 7,500 steeplechase fans came to Glyndon on a gorgeous day yesterday to watch the 108th running of the Maryland Hunt Cup. They brought hand-embroidered tablecloths, candelabras and vases of tulips. They drank champagne, white wine and beer, dressed in everything from button-down shirts and sports coats and long dresses to T-shirts and cutoffs. They pushed baby carriages through violets and brought blankets to spread over the clover of the hillside overlooking the four-mile race course that is made daunting by 22 timber fences.
SPORTS
By Tom Keyser and Tom Keyser,SUN STAFF | September 25, 2004
The last five races Bug River ran for Richard W. "Dickie" Small, the veteran trainer at Pimlico Race, were forgettable. Bug River finished no better than seventh. That was back in 1996 and 1997. Four years later, Bug River found a second career as a steeplechaser. His 10 races over jumps have been memorable. He has performed in the extreme, either not finishing the race (five times) or finishing first or second (five times). Today, at Shawan Downs in Hunt Valley, 11-year-old Bug River provides a focus for the expected crowd of 12,000 race-goers and partygoers.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,SUN STAFF | May 1, 2005
After the feature at My Lady's Manor two weeks ago, owner Irv Naylor was not exactly enthralled with the ride Joe Davies had given Make Me A Champ, who finished second to Pleasant Parcel. Yesterday, Naylor was simply giddy about Davies' second trip on the 14-year-old gelding. "I couldn't face the wrath of Irv Naylor again," the jockey said on the winner's stand after Make Me A Champ overtook defending champion Bug River during a stirring stretch drive and captured the 109th renewal of the Maryland Hunt Cup by slightly more than a neck.
SPORTS
By Ross Peddicord and Ross Peddicord,Sun Staff Writer | August 6, 1995
A heavy afternoon downpour not only transformed a fast track at Pimlico Race Course into a sloppy one, but also made it quite a bit easier yesterday for Count On Numbers to gallop to a 7 1/2 -length, front-running score in the $51,650 Primer Breeders' Cup.Speed carries in the slop and smart horseplayers picked up on it, making Count On Numbers the 6-5 favorite over 2-1 second choice Bug River, who has developed a come-from-behind style."
SPORTS
By Paul McMullen and Paul McMullen,Sun reporter | April 21, 2007
The forecast for today's 105th annual Grand National Steeplechase in Butler is considerably brighter than last year's. The rain that fell on last year's race is not on the radar. The Maryland Amateur Timber Association, with a sponsorship from Union Memorial Hospital, has spiced the proceedings with a $30,000 bonus to the owner if a horse wins both today's Grand National and next Saturday's Maryland Hunt Cup. "The goal is to link the Grand National and Hunt Cup," said Peter Fenwick, secretary to Maryland Steeplechasing.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,Special to The Sun | April 26, 2008
The Maryland Hunt Cup course is considered one of the two toughest in the world, rivaling the English Grand National for its sheer difficulty. Attempting to traverse the four miles and 22 timber fences is a supreme challenge for horse and rider, one that nine such teams will attempt to navigate today in the 112th running of the venerable race at Glyndon. No one knows this better than Charles Fenwick Jr., who won the race five times as a jockey - the last in 1987 aboard Sugar Bee - and continues to be a prominent figure on the scene as a trainer, today entering Make Your Own for owner Laurence F. Oster.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,SUN REPORTER | April 29, 2007
It was strictly sibling revelry at the 111th running of the Maryland Hunt Cup yesterday in Glyndon. In his first trip around the demanding four-mile course, Stewart Strawbridge impressively guided The Bruce to a three-length victory for the trainer, half-sister Sanna Hendriks, who was so thrilled she fumbled the trophy on the winner's stand after the race. Owned by Strawbridge and bred in New Zealand, The Bruce basically accomplished the chore by running on the front end, several times turning back challengers and finishing strongly to beat defending champion Bug River and Lear Charm, who wound up in a dead heat for second.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,SUN REPORTER | April 28, 2007
The state's major spring steeplechase season concludes today with the 111th running of the prestigious Maryland Hunt Cup in Glyndon. And entering the $75,000 race, the story is as much about a jumper who isn't competing and one who hasn't competed well this spring, as it is about those who might contend at the four-mile, 22-obstacle course. Bubble Economy, last weekend's Grand National winner, will not run, so a newly offered $30,000 bonus to the winner of both races will go unclaimed.
SPORTS
By Paul McMullen and Paul McMullen,Sun reporter | April 21, 2007
The forecast for today's 105th annual Grand National Steeplechase in Butler is considerably brighter than last year's. The rain that fell on last year's race is not on the radar. The Maryland Amateur Timber Association, with a sponsorship from Union Memorial Hospital, has spiced the proceedings with a $30,000 bonus to the owner if a horse wins both today's Grand National and next Saturday's Maryland Hunt Cup. "The goal is to link the Grand National and Hunt Cup," said Peter Fenwick, secretary to Maryland Steeplechasing.
SPORTS
By KENT BAKER and KENT BAKER,SUN REPORTER | April 30, 2006
Bug River demolished all the doubts yesterday. Concerns about his fitness, willingness and a new jockey were all removed in slightly more than nine minutes when the 13-year-old son of Polish Numbers staved off a determined bid by Rosbrian to capture the $75,000 Maryland Hunt Cup by a neck on a gorgeous day in Glyndon. Through the stretch drive, they were the lone survivors in a seven-horse field which confronted the grueling four-mile, 22-jump course and they staged a thrilling finish before Bug River clinched his second Hunt Cup victory in the past three years.
SPORTS
By KENT BAKER and KENT BAKER,SUN REPORTER | April 29, 2006
If pari-mutuel wagering were conducted at the prestigious Maryland Hunt Cup, Bug River would clearly be cast as the favorite in today's 110th renewal. The 13-year-old gelding has hit his prime in recent years, winning the 2004 running and finishing a close second last year to Make Me A Champ. But some warning signs have surfaced that provide hope for eight rivals who will answer the starter's call for the grueling 4-mile, 22-jump test at 4 p.m. in Glyndon. "He fell at the Green Spring point-to-point at the second-to-last [fence]
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,Special to The Sun | April 26, 2008
The Maryland Hunt Cup course is considered one of the two toughest in the world, rivaling the English Grand National for its sheer difficulty. Attempting to traverse the four miles and 22 timber fences is a supreme challenge for horse and rider, one that nine such teams will attempt to navigate today in the 112th running of the venerable race at Glyndon. No one knows this better than Charles Fenwick Jr., who won the race five times as a jockey - the last in 1987 aboard Sugar Bee - and continues to be a prominent figure on the scene as a trainer, today entering Make Your Own for owner Laurence F. Oster.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,SUN STAFF | April 23, 2005
The racing season hasn't exactly gotten off to a rousing start for the two-time defending champion in the National Steeplechase Association trainer standings. In the first major timber event of the spring last weekend at My Lady's Manor, Jack Fisher-trained Sham Aciss had a comfortable lead approaching the next-to-last fence when he failed to make the jump, and Pleasant Parcel raced by to win easily. Fisher's bad fortune continued in the "little race" that followed when Plenty of Sweets also fell midway through the run while still competitive, sending rider Ellen Horner to the hospital.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,SUN STAFF | May 1, 2005
After the feature at My Lady's Manor two weeks ago, owner Irv Naylor was not exactly enthralled with the ride Joe Davies had given Make Me A Champ, who finished second to Pleasant Parcel. Yesterday, Naylor was simply giddy about Davies' second trip on the 14-year-old gelding. "I couldn't face the wrath of Irv Naylor again," the jockey said on the winner's stand after Make Me A Champ overtook defending champion Bug River during a stirring stretch drive and captured the 109th renewal of the Maryland Hunt Cup by slightly more than a neck.
SPORTS
By Kent Baker and Kent Baker,SUN STAFF | April 30, 2005
This time last spring, Swayo was primed to strive to become only the ninth horse ever to win the prestigious Maryland Hunt Cup three times. But the day before the race, he developed colic and was scratched. In his stead, Bug River triumphed and, as the year passed, it appeared Swayo had jumped his final fence. An ankle problem later bound him to his stall and the pasture seemed his destination. "After he tied up, we retired him," said Susie McDonald of the Move Up Stable ownership. "We thought at his age [14]
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