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Buffy The Vampire

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By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,SUN REPORTER | July 19, 2007
Buffy the Vampire Slayer is back on the big screen -- this time with a new spin. The character first appeared in the 1992 movie, which spawned a hit TV show and earned her a cult following. Now, Clinton McClung is screening a singalong called Buffy the Musical in cities around the country. It comes to the Avalon Theatre in Washington this weekend. The singalong version of Buffy started as a tribute to a single TV episode. McClung, a self-admitted "Buffy geek," ran a movie theater in Boston a couple of years ago. In November 2004, he thought it would be fun to screen the episode "Once More With Feeling" as a singalong for himself and a few of his friends.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa and Sam Sessa,SUN REPORTER | July 19, 2007
Buffy the Vampire Slayer is back on the big screen -- this time with a new spin. The character first appeared in the 1992 movie, which spawned a hit TV show and earned her a cult following. Now, Clinton McClung is screening a singalong called Buffy the Musical in cities around the country. It comes to the Avalon Theatre in Washington this weekend. The singalong version of Buffy started as a tribute to a single TV episode. McClung, a self-admitted "Buffy geek," ran a movie theater in Boston a couple of years ago. In November 2004, he thought it would be fun to screen the episode "Once More With Feeling" as a singalong for himself and a few of his friends.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach | January 20, 2002
It's about time those of you who still think Buffy the Vampire Slayer is some silly kids' show woke up and smelled the coffee (or perhaps blood would be more appropriate). And the recently released DVD collection of the show's 12 first-season episodes is a good place to start the process. The episodes on Buffy the Vampire Slayer: The Complete First Season --beginning with "Welcome to the Hellmouth," in which the newly expelled Buffy moves to a new town, meets new friends and finds her slayer responsibilities never go away, and running through "Prophecy Girl," her final encounter with The Master, in which Buffy dies for the first (but not last)
NEWS
By Kate Aurthur and Kate Aurthur,Los Angeles Times | March 11, 2007
When audiences last saw the cast of Buffy the Vampire Slayer in May 2003, Buffy and her friends had won a nearly apocalyptic battle between good and evil. Their hometown of Sunnydale, Calif. -- also known as the Hellmouth -- was a gargantuan pit as a result. After peering into the crater, Buffy, played by Sarah Michelle Gellar, walked away with a smile, and the television series came to a close after seven seasons. On March 14, Buffy the Vampire Slayer will return in comic book form. Joss Whedon, Buffy's creator, has written the first five issues and will oversee -- or "executive-produce," he says -- the whole arc as if it were a television show.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | August 3, 1992
"Buffy the Vampire Slayer" is a title in search of a movie.But the film is, at least for an hour or so, so wondrously effervescent and its young star is such a complete charmer that it's hard to sit there without feeling those irritating pangs of warmth and pleasure that signify you are having a good time.Kristy Swanson plays Buffy of that cultural mecca of strip malls, doughnut shoppes and GAP stores called the San Fernando Valley. She is not just from the Valley or of the Valley, she is the Valley: She's the Valleygeist, beautiful, shallow, casually cruel, obscenely vacuous.
FEATURES
October 2, 2001
Between the switch from WB to UPN and the season finale that left Buffy six feet under, no returning series has generated a buzz equal to that of Buffy the Vampire Slayer. I remember a grown-up critic grabbing me in the hallway the day after the season finale and saying, "But, David, she was dead and buried. How can they possibly bring her back and remain credible?" I don't think credibility is a big concern for hardcore fans of this remarkable series. I mean, think of all the wild mythology you had to buy into just to get past the pilot.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | July 31, 1992
"Buffy the Vampire Slayer" is a title in search of a movie.But the film is, at least for an hour or so, so wondrously effervescent and its young star is such a complete charmer that it's hard to sit there without feeling those irritating pangs of warmth and pleasure that signify you are having a good time.Kristy Swanson plays Buffy of that cultural mecca of strip malls, doughnut shoppes and GAP stores called the San Fernando Valley. She is not just from the Valley or of the Valley, she is the Valley: She's the Valleygeist, beautiful, shallow, casually cruel, obscenely vacuous.
FEATURES
By Dallas Morning News | August 11, 1992
People who can't name the U.S. secretary of state or locate Florida on a map can tell you exactly what they think Pee-wee Herman was doing on the evening of Friday, July 26, 1991, in a porno house in Sarasota, Fla. Some will even remember the name of the theater and what it was showing the day Pee-wee, alias Paul Reubens, was arrested there. (Answers: the South Trail Cinema; "Nancy Nurse," "Turn Up the Heat" and "Tiger Shark.")When the news hit, the TV and movie star's own lawyer pronounced his career dead -- proof that even Hollywood lawyers don't know everything.
NEWS
November 13, 1992
MARYLANDERS had fun this past summer -- about 1 percent more than they did the summer before.In the months of July, August and September, Marylanders spent $140.3 million on taxable entertainment, an estimated 1 percent more than was spent in 1991. While spending on boat rides and rentals, golf, amusement rides and athletic events increased, other popular summer-time activities, such as movies and arcades, suffered decreases in popularity.Perhaps due to the mild weather Maryland enjoyed this summer, golfers teed off approximately 11 percent more than they did last year, spending nearly $19 million in the process.
FEATURES
By Judy Rousuck | August 1, 1992
'The Phantom Lady'THEATER The gutsy Bowman Ensemble has mounted a highly theatrical, witty rendition of Calderon de la Barca's 17th century swashbuckling romantic comedy, "The Phantom Lady." The title refers to a young widow, who, despite being kept under lock and key by her over-protective brothers, manages to fall in love with one of their guests. The Bowman Ensemble performs outdoors at McDonogh School in Owings Mills. Tonight's performance is a fund-raising gala. Tickets are $35. Regular performances continue tomorrow at the usual ticket price of $10. Curtain time both nights is 8. For more information, call (410)
FEATURES
By Margot Strohminger and Margot Strohminger,SUN STAFF | May 20, 2003
Ironically enough, the first episode of UPN's series Buffy the Vampire Slayer I was to see was also the last, the finale of its seven-year run. This parallels nicely the show's irony that the First is the primordial evil that attempts to bring about the final demise of the world as we know it. Right now, I'm debating whether the final episode will prove that network executives really are out of touch with teen-age pop culture or that I, at 17, am a...
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN ARTS STAFF | May 20, 2003
Buffy the Vampire Slayer has always been about empowerment, about giving power to those who deserve it and taking it from those who don't. Never has that theme been demonstrated more clearly than in tonight's series finale. Joss Whedon, who created Buffy and has ever been its most inventive (not to mention literate) muse, is back doing the writing, for the first time since the season opener. Aside from bringing an appropriate sense of closure to the series - he who creates, after all, should also be he who destroys - Whedon's return brings back the balance between humor and drama that's largely been missing this season.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN ARTS WRITER | May 18, 2003
Buffy Summers has died before - twice, in fact. But this time, sadly, there will be no vampire CPR or resurrection spell to make things right again. For seven years and 143 episodes, the heroine of television's Buffy the Vampire Slayer has kept the world safe from whatever demons would wish us ill. But after Tuesday, after episode No. 144 concludes, after Buffy and the gang dispatch the ultimate evil they've been battling all season, that job will fall to someone else. The slayer is soon to be no more, slain by the actor who plays her and the writer who created her, both of whom have decided its time to move on. Major bummer.
NEWS
By Dave Barry and Dave Barry,Knight Ridder / Tribune | April 6, 2003
IT'S TAX TIME. I know this because I'm staring at documents that make no sense to me, no matter how many beers I drink. Take, for example, my Keogh Plan. If you're wondering what a Keogh Plan is, the technical answer is: Beats me. All I know is, I have one, and the people who administer it are always sending me Important Tax Information. Here's the first sentence of their most recent letter, which I swear I am not making up: "Dear David: The IRS has extended the deadline for the restatement of your plan to comply with GUST and various other amendments until, in most instances, September 30, 2003."
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | September 24, 2002
Looks like there's a changing of the guard in store for Sunnydale. Faithful watchers of UPN's Buffy the Vampire Slayer know Sunnydale as the ill-named California town that had the misfortune of being built over the hellmouth, a spot all the world's supernatural nasties call home. They've also doubtless heard that star Sarah Michelle Gellar will have fulfilled her seven-year commitment to the show at the end of this season and may not be returning. And while it's dangerous to assume too much from watching just the first episode of any Buffy season - season five, which started out with the Buffster battling Dracula, ended with her dying to save a sister who had never even been introduced in seasons one through four - tonight's 8 o'clock opener suggests the creative forces behind the show are getting ready for anything.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach | January 20, 2002
It's about time those of you who still think Buffy the Vampire Slayer is some silly kids' show woke up and smelled the coffee (or perhaps blood would be more appropriate). And the recently released DVD collection of the show's 12 first-season episodes is a good place to start the process. The episodes on Buffy the Vampire Slayer: The Complete First Season --beginning with "Welcome to the Hellmouth," in which the newly expelled Buffy moves to a new town, meets new friends and finds her slayer responsibilities never go away, and running through "Prophecy Girl," her final encounter with The Master, in which Buffy dies for the first (but not last)
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | July 13, 1999
The only thing that can save Angel, the vampire lover of Buffy, is to drink the blood of a slayer. But the only slayer on hand is Buffy."Drink me," Buffy commands the fading angel, and, boy, does he ever, coming back to life as he drinks like you wouldn't believe.If this isn't a metaphor for sex (and, I might add, one of the more intense, sensual and violent metaphors for sex I have ever seen in a teen drama), then I'm the king of Transylvania, baby.The long-delayed and much-discussed season finale of "Buffy the Vampire Slayer" will finally air tonight on the WB, and I hope every parent of a teen-ager and every adult who has been flapping his or her jaws about teens and popular culture since the carnage at Columbine will watch.
FEATURES
By FORT WORTH STAR-TELEGRAM | July 31, 2000
Some of television's most notable talents have come up dry on Emmy night: Gracie Allen, Buddy Ebsen, Arthur Godfrey, Jack Paar, Peter Graves, Ozzie Nelson and Martin Landau. "The Ed Sullivan Show" was named best variety series in 1955, but Sullivan himself never won. Jackie Gleason and Andy Griffith were consistently passed over, although their comedic sidekicks, Art Carney with Gleason's "The Honeymooners" and Don Knotts with Griffith's self-titled series, won five Emmys apiece. "Roseanne" was never nominated as best comedy during its nine-year run, and it wasn't until recently that Emmy voters found the charming CBS series "Everybody Loves Raymond" worthy.
FEATURES
October 2, 2001
Between the switch from WB to UPN and the season finale that left Buffy six feet under, no returning series has generated a buzz equal to that of Buffy the Vampire Slayer. I remember a grown-up critic grabbing me in the hallway the day after the season finale and saying, "But, David, she was dead and buried. How can they possibly bring her back and remain credible?" I don't think credibility is a big concern for hardcore fans of this remarkable series. I mean, think of all the wild mythology you had to buy into just to get past the pilot.
FEATURES
By FORT WORTH STAR-TELEGRAM | July 31, 2000
Some of television's most notable talents have come up dry on Emmy night: Gracie Allen, Buddy Ebsen, Arthur Godfrey, Jack Paar, Peter Graves, Ozzie Nelson and Martin Landau. "The Ed Sullivan Show" was named best variety series in 1955, but Sullivan himself never won. Jackie Gleason and Andy Griffith were consistently passed over, although their comedic sidekicks, Art Carney with Gleason's "The Honeymooners" and Don Knotts with Griffith's self-titled series, won five Emmys apiece. "Roseanne" was never nominated as best comedy during its nine-year run, and it wasn't until recently that Emmy voters found the charming CBS series "Everybody Loves Raymond" worthy.
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