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March 18, 2000
Attention "Parrot Heads" (otherwise known as Jimmy Buffett fans): Tickets for your hero and his "Coral Reefer Band" go on sale today. Buffett and the band will perform at the Nissan Pavilion (at Stone Ridge in Prince William County, Va.) June 15 and June 17 at 8 p.m. Two other concerts are scheduled for the Merriweather Post Pavilion Aug. 24 and Aug. 26 at 8 p.m. Tickets go on sale for the Merriweather Post Pavilion performance beginning at 10 a.m. and for Nissan Pavilion at 11 a.m. Tickets are available at all Ticketmaster locations, charge by phone: 703-573-SEAT, 202-432-SEAT, 410-481-SEAT or 800-551-SEAT.
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By Laura Lefavor and For The Baltimore Sun | May 13, 2013
If you ever find yourself looking for an excuse to eat more cupcakes, 11-year-old Krissa Hillman has a good one. The fifth-grader from Bollman Bridge Elementary School in Jessup is the creative mastermind behind Cupcakes for Literacy, a business that sells baked goods to benefit local schools, libraries and reading programs. "Literacy is a big part of life. You have to read everything," Hillman said. "So what better way to help people understand than though something everyone likes?"
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NEWS
April 16, 2012
As a taxpayer for more for more than 50 years, I agree with your editorial "The Buffett Rule backlash" (April 13) in which you conclude that "taxing the wealthy at rates others already face is a matter of fairness. " However, the other major issue with reform of the tax code is the sheer complexity of the code itself. Of note, today's tax code is 5,296 pages long. By comparison, the initial tax code in 1913 was 27 pages long. Leon Reinstein, Baltimore
NEWS
April 17, 2012
In your editorial regarding the proposed tax increase for high-earners ("The Buffett Rule backlash," April 12)," you state that Warren Buffett's secretarial staff "were shown to pay a higher percentage of their income to the tax man than their billionaire boss. " However, to the best of my knowledge, neither Mr. Buffett's personal secretary nor anyone else from his company have publicly presented their personal tax returns to validate that information. To see this unverified claim in a column is understandable.
BUSINESS
By New York Daily News | September 5, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Warren E. Buffett, the homespun billionaire on a mission to clean up Salomon Bros. Inc., bowed to the inevitable yesterday and said he welcomed the tighter controls Congress is aiming at the $2.3 trillion government securities ZTC market."
NEWS
By David Kusnet and David Kusnet,Special to The Sun | August 20, 1995
"Buffett: The Making of an American Capitalist," by Roger Lowenstein. New York: Random House. 463 pages. $25 With the Walt Disney Co.'s planned buyout of Capital Cities/ABC, the biggest winner will be a mild-mannered billionaire who makes his home in middle America and defies the stereotypes of vulture capitalists.Already worth $9.2 billion, Warren Buffett stands to make $2.1 billion from the Disney deal. And that is likely to catapult him from second to first among America's wealthiest individuals.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | February 15, 1995
Warren E. Buffett, the widely followed Nebraska investor, is betting $2 billion that there is money to be made in stocks that deal with money. He disclosed yesterday that his holding company had purchased stakes in two major financial services companies: 9.8 percent of American Express Co. and 8.3 percent of PNC Bank Corp. of Pittsburgh.Many investors like to mimic Mr. Buffett's investments, and shares of both companies surged yesterday on the New York Stock Exchange. The stock of American Express rose $1.375, to $33.50, its highest level in eight years.
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK and JAY HANCOCK,jay.hancock@baltsun.com | December 18, 2008
"Warren Buffett loses out to the French" was the gist of several headlines yesterday on Electricite de France's deal to invest $4.5 billion in Constellation Energy Group. Constellation's board spurned Buffett's competing offer and blocked his plans to merge the Baltimore-based energy seller into another power company based in Iowa. But Buffett rarely loses, and he didn't lose here. At a time when no investor is making profits on anything, his investment in Constellation more than doubled his money in a few months.
BUSINESS
By Hanah Cho and Hanah Cho,hanah.cho@baltsun.com | January 15, 2009
Constellation Energy Group repaid a $1 billion emergency loan this week, plus $5 million in interest, to Warren Buffett's MidAmerican Energy Holdings Co., according to documents filed yesterday with the Securities and Exchange Commission. Last month, Constellation terminated a $4.7 billion takeover deal with MidAmerican, which also had provided the immediate cash infusion in mid-September. At the time, CEG was teetering near bankruptcy amid a liquidity crisis in its commodities-trading business.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney and Timothy J. Mullaney,Sun Staff Writer | March 14, 1995
In a further sign of his disillusionment with USAir Group Inc., billionaire investor Warren Buffett said yesterday that he will leave the board of the financially struggling airline at its next annual meeting.Mr. Buffett, chief executive of Berkshire Hathaway Inc., blamed USAir's failure to reach a "timely agreement with its organized labor groups" that would allow the airline to cut costs and survive in an airline market marked by fierce price competition. Berkshire Vice Chairman Charles T. Munger also will leave USAir's board.
NEWS
April 16, 2012
First, I'm an 80-year-old living on Social Security, and I know all the tax loopholes need to be closed ("The Buffett Rule backlash," April 13). But isn't it correct that Warren Buffett owes the IRS a great deal of taxes for a number of years? Let's have a true picture of Mr. Buffett. The proposed reductions in Medicare and Medicaid costs will hopefully take place by reducing fraud in the systems and not by reducing services. Vera Papa
NEWS
April 16, 2012
As a taxpayer for more for more than 50 years, I agree with your editorial "The Buffett Rule backlash" (April 13) in which you conclude that "taxing the wealthy at rates others already face is a matter of fairness. " However, the other major issue with reform of the tax code is the sheer complexity of the code itself. Of note, today's tax code is 5,296 pages long. By comparison, the initial tax code in 1913 was 27 pages long. Leon Reinstein, Baltimore
NEWS
April 16, 2012
You end your editorial on the Buffett Rule ("The Buffett Rule backlash," April 13) with the question, "Where will the $50 billion come from to balance the budget, if not from this minimum tax plan?" Here's the answer: From less spending! George B. Wroe, Glyndon
NEWS
April 12, 2012
Critics of the so-called "Buffett Rule," President Barack Obama's proposal to impose a minimum income tax on the wealthy, would like to have their gilded cake and eat it, too. On the one hand, they contend that the proposal would have a minimal impact on closing the deficit, and on the other, they claim that it would greatly discourage investment. Clearly, it can't be so small as to have a negligible effect on tax revenue while simultaneously so big as to have a ruinous impact on the economy.
NEWS
Jay Hancock | January 25, 2012
The Web economics argument of the day is whether Romney's and Warren Buffett's tax rates are really 15 percent or lower. Last night Obama reiterated Warren Buffett's argument that Buffett's tax rate is lower than that of Buffett's secretary. Mitt Romney's tax rate for 2010 was way less than 15 percent, his tax return shows. Their rates and the rates of the wealthy in general are that low for several reasons. The rich have more loopholes to take advantage of and more lawyers to find them than you and I. Since much of their income is in the form of dividends and capital gains, it's taxed at lower rates than ordinary income.
NEWS
September 22, 2011
Can you please report on the number of millionaires in Congress, both senators and representatives? For those in Congress who are millionaires it seems to me they have a vested interest in not raising taxes on themselves, while we other "non-millionaire" citizens do the heavy lifting in terms of paying our taxes. Greg Leyko, Parkton
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | January 31, 2003
Jimmy Buffett is scheduled to return to Merriweather Post Pavilion after a two-year absence. Merriweather has not released its summer schedule, but Buffett's Web site at www.mar garitaville.com lists a June 19 tour date at the Columbia venue, with tickets to go on sale March 8. Buffett has built a following - and a merchandising empire - from his laid-back, tropical-themed songs. He was an annual sold-out attraction at Merriweather until 2001, when he decided not to schedule a concert there.
BUSINESS
By Bill Atkinson | May 23, 1999
ROBERT G. Hagstrom isn't your average Warren Buffett groupie.For seven consecutive years, he's made the trek from his home in Wayne, Pa., to Berkshire Hathaway Inc.'s annual meeting in Omaha, Neb. He's written two books on the man called the "Oracle of Omaha" and the world's greatest investor. And he follows Buffett's teachings as a true disciple, by managing his own mutual fund -- the Legg Mason Focus Trust -- the way Buffett would."I clearly couldn't have picked a better role model to study," said Hagstrom, 42.The approach is paying off, not only in the fund's performance but recognition.
NEWS
September 21, 2011
It is amazing to me how a newspaper like The Sun can make statements in its editorials that are abject lies. You stated that the GOP has responded negatively to the Buffett Rule which is supposed to make sure "that millionaires will pay at a tax rate that is at least comparable to what middle-class American must pay. " However, a chart published the same day as your editorial in the Wall Street Journal shows that the Buffett Rule premise is false....
NEWS
August 30, 2011
Brian Murphy's analysis of Warren Buffet's position on paying higher taxes misses the larger point Mr. Buffet was making ("Raising taxes on the rich won't cause them to flee," Aug. 29). The practical and reasonable response to our country's deficit situation is a combination of reduced spending and increased taxes. Only through both can we reduce the deficit significantly and ensure a stable economy that allows us to make the kind of investments we need in order to create jobs.
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