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By Jacques Kelly | December 9, 2009
Willie Henry Greene, a retired Westinghouse employee and decorated World War II combat veteran, died of heart disease Nov. 26 at St. Agnes Hospital. The Mount Winans resident was 85. The son of a blacksmith, he was born in Faber, Va. "He grew up on a self-sustaining, family-owned land with nine siblings," said his daughter, Aleta T. Greene of Baltimore. "He would tell how, at 15 years old, he learned to make mattresses at a factory. He made mattresses for the iron beds they shared, but to also bring in extra money to the household."
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NEWS
Havre de Grace Independence Celebration Inc | July 8, 2013
The following are results of awards from the 2013 Havre de Grace Independence Day Parade held on Saturday, July 6. Marching Units Best Color Guard First Place: S.A.L. Post 47 Second Place: Veterans of Foreign Wars Third Place: Yankee Rebels Best Decorated Bicycle First Place: Uncle Sam - Michael Blackness Second Place: Howard Latham Best Comic Entry First Place: A & A Clowns Best Majorette Group (Twirling, not dance) First Place: Level Majorettes Best Marching Band/Dance Unit First Place: "The Band" Second Place: Dynasty Best Majorette/Dance Unit Drum Line First Place: Dynasty Second Place: "The Band" Best Youth Group First Place: Landsdowne Shooting Stars Second Place: HdG Recreation Cheer Leaders Third Place: Meadowvale Elementary School Fourth Place: Havre de Grace Little League Best Equestrian Group First Place: Freedom Hills Best Motorcycle or Car/Van Unit First Place: Boumi Shriner Motor Corps Second Place: American Legion Post 128 Riders Third Place: Buffalo Soldiers Best Junior Organizational First Place: Harford County Library Second Place: Cub Scouts #555 Third Place: Black Youth in Action Fourth Place: Charm City Boxing Best Senior Organizational First Place: Steppingstone Museum Second Place: HdG Maritime Museum Third Place: Friends of Concord Point Fourth...
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NEWS
By GREGORY KANE | August 1, 1998
IF YOU'RE reading this paper, that means you're awake. And if you're awake before 9 a.m., drop this paper and head out to the Holiday Inn in Timonium. History awaits you.From 9 a.m. until 11 a.m., there will be a presentation on the history of the Buffalo Soldiers. The presentation comes to you courtesy of the 9th and 10th Horse Cavalry Association, which has been holding the 132nd Annual Buffalo Soldier Reunion at the hotel since Wednesday. Visitors will be able to view exhibits on the history of the 9th and 10th Cavalry regiments, buy 10th Cavalry caps, navy-blue cavalry hats circa the 1880s, T-shirts, books and insignia.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare, The Baltimore Sun | November 10, 2010
In the crowd gathered Wednesday in Towson's Patriot Plaza on the eve of Veterans Day, a retired Army sergeant stood proudly at attention, during the presentation of colors, the National Anthem and the Pledge of Allegiance. Gordon Pinkney, whose 34 years of service include combat tours in Vietnam and Iraq, wore a cap that said "Buffalo Soldiers. " On it was a patch that depicted a cavalry man and read, "We can we will. " "Ceremonies like this show you all care," Pinkney said. "That is all any soldier wants to hear.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | September 5, 2003
To Down Under director Gregor Jordan, his tart, engrossing Buffalo Soldiers, based on Robert O'Connor's novel, boasts a universal-soldier kind of story. Bristling with black comedy, it centers on an arms-for-heroin deal that takes shape on a U.S. Army base in Germany right before Berliners tear down their wall. Over the phone four months ago, Jordan said he could have set plots similar to the one he derived from O'Connor's book in the Chinese, Russian, British or Australian armies. When he grew up on Australian air force bases, he knew that bad behavior was bubbling beneath the surface all around him. (His father was a pilot in Vietnam.
NEWS
By Ron Snyder and Ron Snyder,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | July 21, 1998
One hundred years ago, Sgt. Augustus Walley was in Cuba and the Philippines, fighting in the Spanish-American War. A member of the all-black Buffalo Soldiers cavalry unit, he fought alongside Teddy Roosevelt's Rough Riders at Kettle Hill and San Juan Heights.Yesterday, the memory of the Reisterstown native was honored with the unveiling of a memorial plaque at the intersection of Route 140 and Cockeys Mills Road in Reisterstown.For Houston Wedlock, a retired Army sergeant and Buffalo Soldier re-enactor, the memorial represents long-overdue recognition for Walley, who also received two Medals of Honor.
NEWS
By Alisa Samuels and Alisa Samuels,SUN STAFF | February 20, 1996
They traveled across the Western frontier, fighting rustlers and bandits to protect the nation's territories. But Houston Douglas Wedlock's great-great-uncle and other Buffalo Soldiers never reached most American history books.To correct that, Mr. Wedlock of Columbia's Long Reach village offers educational programs about his uncle, Charles Davis, and other members of the decorated all-black cavalry and infantry units.The trucking company safety manager is the only Howard County member of the Baltimore chapter of the Buffalo Soldiers Association.
NEWS
By Alisa Samuels and Alisa Samuels,SUN STAFF | February 20, 1996
They traveled across the Western frontier, fighting rustlers and bandits to protect the nation's territories. But Houston Douglas Wedlock's great-great-uncle and other Buffalo Soldiers never reached most American his tory books.To correct the slight, Mr. Wedlock, of Columbia's Long Reach village, offers educational programs about his uncle, Charles Davis, and other members of the oft-decorated, all-black cavalries and infantries.The trucking company safety manager is the only Howard County member of the Baltimore chapter of the Buffalo Soldiers Association, which promotes the soldiers.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 5, 2003
It was as if those old soldiers reached through time and tapped Walter Brady on the shoulder. Nearly 50 years old, raising his son and four grandchildren with his wife, Brady had every excuse to ignore the men - and the impulse their dusty battle stories awakened within him. He didn't. He headed to the nearest Army Reserve recruiter and presented himself for service, just as he had 32 years earlier when he joined the Army and stayed for seven years. This time was different. This time he was continuing a legacy.
NEWS
By Melissa Corley and Melissa Corley,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | March 23, 1998
Mark Matthews is mostly blind and hard of hearing, but the 103-year-old former Buffalo Soldier will not let anyone take his picture until he is certain his cavalry hat is on straight. He sits at attention, his chin jutting out, as a friend snaps away.Matthews, who served on the Mexican border in 1912 and in the Pacific during World War II, is to be inducted tonight into Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 160 on Dorsey Road in Glen Burnie. He is the last survivor of the regiments of black soldiers who patrolled the Old West.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly | December 9, 2009
Willie Henry Greene, a retired Westinghouse employee and decorated World War II combat veteran, died of heart disease Nov. 26 at St. Agnes Hospital. The Mount Winans resident was 85. The son of a blacksmith, he was born in Faber, Va. "He grew up on a self-sustaining, family-owned land with nine siblings," said his daughter, Aleta T. Greene of Baltimore. "He would tell how, at 15 years old, he learned to make mattresses at a factory. He made mattresses for the iron beds they shared, but to also bring in extra money to the household."
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly , jacques.kelly@baltsun.com | December 9, 2009
Willie Henry Greene, a retired Westinghouse employee and decorated World War II combat veteran, died of heart disease Nov. 26 at St. Agnes Hospital. The Mount Winans resident was 85. The son of a blacksmith, he was born in Faber, Va. "He grew up on a self-sustaining, family-owned land with nine siblings," said his daughter, Aleta T. Greene of Baltimore. "He would tell how, at 15 years old, he learned to make mattresses at a factory. He made mattresses for the iron beds they shared, but to also bring in extra money to the household."
NEWS
By Capsules by Michael Sragow | October 10, 2008
Capsules by Michael Sragow. Full reviews are at baltimoresun.com/movies. Flash of Genius : **** ( 4 STARS) The true-to-life story of how Robert Kearns (Greg Kinnear) invented the intermittent windshield wiper and then, in the courts, took on Ford Motor Co. for stealing his device. The whole movie is haunting and memorable, with flashes of high comedy. And it's exhilarating in an authentic, pathos-streaked way to see Kearns, through Kinnear's inspired characterization, represent himself during his trial.
NEWS
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | September 26, 2008
Spike Lee's Tuscany-set World War II movie, Miracle at St. Anna, is overlong, awkward and unsubtle, yet at the end, when the screen went black and a bracingly clear and fervid chorus broke into the glorious spiritual "He's got the whole world in his hands," my throat tightened and I fought back tears. For all his excesses and wrong turns, Lee has made a grown-up movie with an adult sense of loss and an adult sense of hope. He may be addicted to broad flourishes, but he has the big emotions to back them up. Miracle at St. Anna mostly follows four "Buffalo Soldiers" - African-American soldiers fighting in segregated units - as they leapfrog over the rest of the Army's positions and land in a hamlet filled with terrified villagers.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen | July 15, 2008
James Thorn, a retired career Army sergeant who was also an active member of the Buffalo Soldiers Ninth & Tenth (Horse) Cavalry Association, died of lung cancer July 8 at his Hanover home. He was 74. Mr. Thorn was born and raised in Milford, Del., and was a 1952 graduate of Milford High School. He attended Delaware State College and earned a bachelor's degree in managerial studies from Columbia College in Columbia, Mo., in 1972. Mr. Thorn served for 30 years in the Army and was a sergeant major at the time of his retirement in 1985.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 5, 2003
It was as if those old soldiers reached through time and tapped Walter Brady on the shoulder. Nearly 50 years old, raising his son and four grandchildren with his wife, Brady had every excuse to ignore the men - and the impulse their dusty battle stories awakened within him. He didn't. He headed to the nearest Army Reserve recruiter and presented himself for service, just as he had 32 years earlier when he joined the Army and stayed for seven years. This time was different. This time he was continuing a legacy.
FEATURES
By M. Dion Thompson and M. Dion Thompson,SUN STAFF | April 21, 1996
The black cavalrymen seemed perfect, as if they had come fresh from a dream.They sat tall and proud in the saddle, unfazed by the stinging rain or the wind whipping through the hills outside Denver, Colo. It didn't matter that they were re-enactors carrying on the legacy of the black warriors the Cheyenne called Buffalo Soldiers.What mattered was that they had reclaimed a long-neglected history.Interest in Buffalo Soldiers has grown in recent years. They have made it onto a postage stamp; Gen. Colin L. Powell refers to them as a source of strength and inspiration; a statue in their honor stands in Fort Leavenworth, Kan.About 10,000 black men served in the U.S. Army during the Indian Wars of the late 19th century.
NEWS
February 21, 2001
Reading by 9 is a project aimed at helping Baltimore-area students learn to read well by third grade. This section will offer advice, resources and stories designed to help parents and children have fun reading together. PANDAMANIA Welcome Mei Xiang and Tian Tian at the Giant Pandas at the Smithsonian National Zoo Web site at pandas.si.edu. The site features tons of great pictures and a live Pandacam. Follow the links about panda research, and examine the map of the pandas' cool habitat.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | September 5, 2003
To Down Under director Gregor Jordan, his tart, engrossing Buffalo Soldiers, based on Robert O'Connor's novel, boasts a universal-soldier kind of story. Bristling with black comedy, it centers on an arms-for-heroin deal that takes shape on a U.S. Army base in Germany right before Berliners tear down their wall. Over the phone four months ago, Jordan said he could have set plots similar to the one he derived from O'Connor's book in the Chinese, Russian, British or Australian armies. When he grew up on Australian air force bases, he knew that bad behavior was bubbling beneath the surface all around him. (His father was a pilot in Vietnam.
NEWS
By Ivan Penn and Ivan Penn,SUN STAFF | July 16, 2003
It might seem inconceivable in this day and age that the Army at one time court-martialed and dishonorably discharged a man for allegedly drinking and using bad language in front of a woman. But because it happened to Henry Vinton Plummer - a Prince George's County native and the first African-American chaplain in the Army - his reputation remains tarnished by the military ruling more than 100 years ago, which said he had behaved with "conduct unbecoming an officer and a gentleman." Plummer's descendants are fighting to have the decision overturned, saying the military's case was wrought with false testimony and racial bias.
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