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NEWS
By A. M. Rosenthal | September 29, 1994
New York--THE TWO massacres do not appear on the agenda as presidents and prime ministers gather in New York to attend the new session of the U.N. General Assembly.But the plain reality is that they are the essence of what the United Nations is supposed to deal with: aggression and expanding threats to international peace and security.The first massacre took place on March 17, 1992 -- the bombing of the Israeli Embassy in Buenos Aires. Twenty-nine people were killed. The message was that no Israeli establishment, anywhere in the world, was safe from attack.
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TRAVEL
By Alan Solomon and Alan Solomon,Chicago Tribune | April 29, 2007
BUENOS AIRES, ARGENTINA There's something about this place. Maybe it's the tango. Those of you who have witnessed the real thing know tango -- when done right -- is not a dance for sissies. It is aggressive, moody, seductive, sometimes beautiful and maybe a little dangerous. Like Buenos Aires. So ... is it a cliche to compare Buenos Aires to the tango? Maybe, but it was either that or Evita. Which brings me to the subject of steakhouses -- but first, the obligatory travel story transition paragraphs: Cool place to visit, Buenos Aires.
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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | March 18, 1992
BUENOS AIRES, Argentina -- A powerful explosion, which the Argentine government described as a terrorist attack, destroyed the Israeli Embassy in downtown Buenos Aires yesterday. The blast killed at least 10 people and wounded almost 100, including 13 children from a nearby school.The huge explosion, which appeared to have been set off by a car bomb, rocked the central part of the city at 3 p.m. with a blast that could be heard three miles away. The five-story building was almost totally demolished, and a plume of smoke rose hundreds of feet from the rubble.
NEWS
By Patrick J. McDonnell and Patrick J. McDonnell,LOS ANGELES TIMES | October 18, 2006
BUENOS AIRES, Argentina -- Defiled by grave robbers, banished from the presidential grounds and sliced for DNA samples, the battered remains of former Argentine President Juan Domingo Peron was moved yesterday to a new monument where enthusiasts hope the remains of his celebrated former wife Eva "Evita" Peron will one day join him. But violent clashes among rival union groups at the mausoleum site southwest of Buenos Aires marred the planned ceremony....
FEATURES
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,Sun Staff | August 9, 1998
In today's Travel section, a photograph of the San Telmo neighborhood in Buenos Aires is misidentified as La Boca.The Sun regrets the error.In a map on Page 4 of today's Travel section, labels for the Atlantic and Pacific oceans were inadvertently transposed.The Sun regrets the error.There are few sensations so emptying as going back to a place that's no longer there, a house you lived in, a favored neighborhood, or even a city or country that has become utterly different, and you find that the nest that warmed your memories is gone.
FEATURES
By Richard Christiansen and Richard Christiansen,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | December 29, 1996
"I will return, and I will be millions."-- Maria Eva Duarte de PeronIt does not take long for the visitor to Buenos Aires to realize how prophetic the dying Eva Peron was 44 years ago, when she promised her public that she would always be with them, even after death and more than ever.One of the first directional markings on the expressway leading into the city from Ezeiza airport points to the Evita City housing project, named in her honor; and in the crowded, bustling center of Greater Buenos Aires, the signs of Evita are everywhere.
NEWS
August 9, 1998
In today's Travel section, a photograph of the San Telmo neighborhood in Buenos Aires is misidentified as La Boca.The Sun regrets the error.Pub Date: 8/09/98
SPORTS
By Katherine Dunn | May 3, 2001
Bryn Mawr senior field hockey player Carey Fetting-Smith has earned a berth on the U.S. team headed for the International Hockey Federation Women's Junior World Cup in Buenos Aires, Argentina later this month. Fetting-Smith helped the United States qualify for the competition by finishing second at the Pan American Junior Championships last summer in Barbados. Fetting-Smith, a high school All-American and a member of the national under-21 team for two years, was the All-Metro field hockey Player of the Year last fall after leading Bryn Mawr to the Interscholastic Athletic Association of Maryland A Conference crown.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | March 26, 1995
BUENOS AIRES, Argentina -- About 75 tons of arms from Argentina, which is a mediator in the border dispute between Ecuador and Peru, were illegally sold to Ecuador during its brief war with Peru over the region last month.Argentina's deputy foreign minister, Fernando Petrella, said that the government had been duped by arms traffickers into signing what officials thought was an agreement to sell the weapons -- 105- and 155-mm cannon, rifles, pistols, heavy machine guns and mortars -- to Venezuela for $34 million.
NEWS
October 14, 1997
Orlando Agosti, 73, a former Argentine air force chief who was a member of the military junta that ousted Isabel Peron in a 1976 coup, died of cancer yesterday in Buenos Aires, Argentina.Kenneth Hahn, 77, the longest-serving member of the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors, died Sunday of heart failure in Los Angeles. After spending five years on the City Council, Hahn was elected to the county board in 1952 and retired in 1992, making him California's longest-serving county supervisor.
NEWS
By FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN and FREDERICK N. RASMUSSEN,SUN REPORTER | November 5, 2005
Evita, the long-running hit Broadway musical now at the Hippodrome about the life of Eva Peron, wife of Argentinian dictator Juan Peron, has special significance for Dr. George G. Udvarhelyi, the internationally renowned Johns Hopkins neurosurgeon. The physician was born and educated in Hungary, and he worked in the Underground against the Nazi occupation of his homeland during World War II. He barely managed to escape deportation to Siberia when the Russians took over. Udvarhelyi's odyssey, which would take him to Argentina as a young surgical resident, began on a spring-like day in February 1948 when he boarded a steamer in Genoa, Italy.
TRAVEL
By Joshua Robin and Joshua Robin,NEWSDAY | May 29, 2005
Hernan, our taxi driver in Buenos Aires, one night after a dinner flowing with wine, offered a resonant assessment of his town. "There are two things I love," he said, looking at us in his rearview mirror. "First, the weather. Second, it doesn't matter where you come from." I can't agree with the former. We expected summer warmth during a February trip to the Southern Hemisphere, but it rained most of the seven days my fiancee and I spent in Argentina. But the truth of the latter point - Buenos Aires welcomed us, as it seems to welcome all newcomers - wiped out any chill and left only pleasant memories of my new favorite city.
TRAVEL
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 29, 2005
Most people go to the opera to see the show. In Buenos Aires, many go just to see the opera house. Recently refurbished, the Teatro Colon offers guided tours through what is one of the world's truly great houses of music. These tours are a hot attraction, especially for the tourists flooding the Argentine capital these days, where the dollar still has muscle. The tours are in Spanish, English, Portuguese and other languages. I saw my first opera in the Colon in 1965: Aida, by Giuseppe Verdi, the same opera that opened the place in 1908.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 21, 2003
BUENOS AIRES, Argentina - Moving to widen his fragile base of political support, Argentina's new president-elect, Nestor Kirchner, named an ideologically diverse Cabinet yesterday that includes independents and members of opposition groups as well as members of his own faction and others within the ruling Peronist Party. The main distinguishing feature of the 13-member Cabinet, Kirchner said in announcing the appointments, is that it has "a lot of plurality" and includes some fresh young faces that may be unfamiliar here in the capital.
NEWS
March 12, 2003
WHEN PRESIDENT Bush identified the "axis of evil" a year ago, it was an infelicitous bit of rhetoric that is sure to provoke plenty of headaches in years to come - but it wasn't something he made up out of whole cloth. Iraq most likely does have chemical and biological weapons. North Korea does have a frightening nuclear weapons program. And Iran, as the Bush administration is now trumpeting, does have a reactor program that could produce enough enriched uranium for several nuclear bombs in the next few years.
NEWS
By Reed Lindsay and Reed Lindsay,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 11, 2002
LA MATANZA, Argentina - In this sprawling, poor outskirt of Buenos Aires, where an estimated 40 percent of the work force is unemployed or underemployed, help-wanted signs disappeared years ago. So when Jose Eduardo Valenzuela lost his job as a taxi driver last year, he didn't bother looking for another one. Instead, he signed up with the local branch of the leftist Classist and Combative Current (CCC), a militant grass-roots organization that specializes in anti-government highway-blocking protests called piquetes.
NEWS
By New York Times | February 11, 1992
BUENOS AIRES, Argentina -- The Argentine authorities were either unwilling or unable to bring Nazi war criminals to justice even when they had them in custody, according to archives made public for the first time.The archives on five Nazi war criminals that were made available by Argentina show a pattern that confirms what many have said for years, that war criminals found a safe haven here and that this country was probably one of the easiest in which to disappear and escape justice.Last week, President Carlos Menem ordered the files opened and gave government agencies 30 days to produce any they had on suspected war criminals who came to Argentina.
NEWS
By Dallas Morning News | March 18, 1992
BUENOS AIRES, Argentina -- Confidential files made public Feb. 3 by order of President Carlos Menem show what many have long suspected: Argentina offered refuge to some of the world's most wanted Nazi war criminals and protected them for decades.The men felt so safe in Argentina that several, such as Josef Mengele and Josef Franz Schwammberger, shed fake identities and went back to using their real names.When international Nazi hunters closed in and sought help, police stalled repeatedly.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | February 2, 2002
BUENOS AIRES, Argentina - Outside Argentina's Congress building, protesters upset about a government freeze on bank deposits recently swarmed around lawmaker Franco Caviglia and threatened harm, forcing him to scamper into a bar for protection until police arrived. Hours earlier, other protesters surrounded an obscure congressional adviser and hurled insults and expletives at him. Also, former Planning Minister Roberto Dromi, who oversaw important privatization projects in the early 1990s, was met by angry citizens shouting threats when he stepped out of a car in downtown Buenos Aires.
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara | December 27, 2001
ONE NIGHT long ago in Argentina, I witnessed a drama on the Avenida de Mayo, which stretches from the presidential palace to the brooding pile that houses the national congress. Hundreds of young men marched singing the forbidden anthems of the Peronists into an encounter with another group of men - older men, on horseback, armed with pistols and nightsticks. It was a lively fight: The air filled with vivid curses, acrid clouds of gas; ball bearings were released over the asphalt to upend the horses.
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