Advertisement
HomeCollectionsBudget
IN THE NEWS

Budget

NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler, The Baltimore Sun | April 3, 2014
A tentative deal was reached Thursday in Annapolis to increase tax credits for film and television productions shot in Maryland, in a bid to keep popular TV series like "House of Cards" and "Veep" from abandoning the state. A joint conference committee on the budget agreed to provide up to $18.5 million in film tax credits, significantly more than the $7.5 million that Gov. Martin O'Malley had originally proposed. Media Rights Capital, the California company producing the Netflix series "House of Cards," warned state officials by letter that it was putting off work on the show's third season until it could be assured that sufficient tax credits would be approved.
Advertisement
FEATURES
By Laura Barnhardt Cech, For The Baltimore Sun | March 31, 2014
Monica Snodgrass was a brave woman to invite more than two dozen 7-year-olds into her home for her son's birthday party. But with spot-on entertainment planned, it wasn't the headache one might envision.  The Clarksville mother of three had arranged for a visit from Darth Vader, who led light saber training with pool noodles, and talked about what it means to be a Jedi. “You could say it's just a kid's birthday party,” says Snodgrass, whose Heroes for Hire character knew to mention his TIE fighter.
NEWS
Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | March 25, 2014
Maryland House Republicans offered an alternative to Gov. Martin O'Malley's spending plan Tuesday, suggesting the state limit spending to 1 percent above last year. The minority caucus, dramatically outnumbered in the House of Delegates, push an alternative budget every year. This year, House Republicans criticized the governor and state Democrats for diverting some pension payments to help plug budget gaps and for increasing state spending by 5 percent over last year.  During an Annapolis press conference, several Republican delegates criticized the term-limited governor for the the growth of state spending during his tenure.
NEWS
March 21, 2014
The number of jobs in Maryland decreased by 9,800 in January. The statewide unemployment rate remains high at around 6 percent (compared to 3.6 percent at the start of 2008), and projected state tax revenues have recently been adjusted downward by $238 million. Balancing next year's budget has required some "creative" accounting in Annapolis, including dipping into money that was supposed to be set aside for state pensions. Under those circumstances, a tax break might even be in order, but surely lawmakers would want it focused on creating new jobs, particularly for communities like Baltimore or the lower Eastern Shore where the unemployment rates still hover near the double-digit mark.
NEWS
March 19, 2014
When Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake prepared her first city budget in 2010, she had to find a way to resolve a projected $190 deficit. In 2011, she faced another shortfall, this time $65 million. In 2012, the projected deficit was $48 million. Last year, it was $30 million. But now, for the first time since she took office, Mayor Rawlings-Blake is proposing a spending plan that includes no cuts to city services. Instead, it offers city workers a 2 percent raise - a far cry from the furloughs they experienced not long ago - and includes modest investments in a handful of priorities while continuing a long-term plan to cut property tax rates for homeowners.
ENTERTAINMENT
The Baltimore Sun | March 19, 2014
It's one of the most important wedding decisions - where to, you know, have the wedding. Apart from finding a spot that fits your unique tastes and themes, there's the matter of timing. Some wedding consultants suggest booking one year or more in advance. Yeah, these places fill up fast. And while we can't guarantee you'll get your first choice in time, we do want to help you out. We spoke with Julie Savage Parekh, the creative director of Strawberry Milk Events in Baltimore, and her team, who offered four recommended venues in town to hit your price point.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | March 18, 2014
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake will unveil a proposed $2.5 billion budget Wednesday that would give city workers a 2 percent raise and - for the first time since 2008 - would not cut city services, officials said. The plan includes the latest installment in the mayor's 10-year plan to reduce property taxes by 22 percent. Officials said the city's stabilizing financial picture also allows $26 million in new capital investments, including $5 million in technology to allow police officers to file reports from crime scenes and their supervisors to better manage overtime costs.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | March 17, 2014
The Rawlings-Blake administration's efforts to slash Baltimore's long-term deficit has run into a bump - more than $100 million in new police, education and other expenses now expected over the next decade. The school system is billing the city for more students than expected - at a cost of several million dollars a year. The enrollment figures are wrong, school and city officials agree, but under state law, the city still has to pay a bill that could come to $43 million. Settlements of lawsuits against the Police Department and increased landfill costs are among other expenses that were not anticipated in the fiscal plan.
HEALTH
By Scott Dance, The Baltimore Sun | March 14, 2014
At NASA Goddard Space Flight Center last month, Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski and space agency Administrator Charles Bolden stressed the importance of maintaining budget support for the James Webb Space Telescope, keeping it on track for a 2018 launch. Sticking to that schedule is the job of the Webb telescope's project manager, Bill Ochs, who, from his office on the Greenbelt campus, oversees all of the moving parts slated to come together and be blasted into space in 41/2 years. It's a complicated job, Ochs acknowledged, but since new development and spending plans were approved three years ago for the delayed and over-budget project, things have been running smoothly.
FEATURES
By Michael Gold and The Baltimore Sun | March 13, 2014
Some South Carolina lawmakers weren't thrilled to learn that two public universities assigned books with gay and lesbian themes as reading for students.   So, in a state budget approved Wednesday by the South Carolina House of Representatives,  legislators cut both schools' book-buying budgets . The budget will now go to the South Carolina Senate. Like many colleges these days, both the College of Charleston and the University of South Carolina Upstate have first-year reading programs that have freshmen read the same book and discuss it on campus.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.