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NEWS
By Kym Byrnes | April 17, 2014
As the county budget process gets underway, three Carroll County commissioners have put two plans on the table to spend $12.9 million FY2014 in budget surplus. In a Town Hall meeting on Tuesday, Carroll County commissioners Doug Howard and Haven Shoemaker proposed a plan to spend the surplus on education, nonprofits and IT upgrades, among other things. "I think [this plan] will actually allow us to move forward in strengthening some of the areas that have been struggling for the past couple years," Howard said.
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NEWS
April 16, 2014
It's tempting to dismiss Attorney General Douglas F. Gansler's proposals to reduce state spending on the basis of his spectacularly bad idea of eliminating the state prosecutor's office. Getting rid of the one semi-independent actor in Maryland's political establishment with the power to investigate public corruption is exactly the wrong thing to do. However, the rest of the Democratic gubernatorial candidate's plan includes a number of thoughtful observations about Maryland's $38 billion budget and some sensible approaches to making it more efficient.
NEWS
By Alison Knezevich and Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | April 15, 2014
Baltimore County Executive Kevin Kamenetz released a budget proposal Tuesday that he says is part of a long-term plan to eliminate school overcrowding, resulting in a surplus of classroom seats by 2021. The county could face a shortage of 1,400 seats by then without aggressive funding, said Kamenetz, whose proposal was the final budget address of his current term. "If there is a shortage of seats, that means more trailers and larger class sizes," the county executive said at a news briefing before the budget unveiling.
NEWS
April 14, 2014
City school officials facing a $31 million budget shortfall next year have proposed dipping into the system's rainy day fund to close the gap. But that's not what those dollars are supposed to be for. The whole point of setting aside emergency funds is to cushion the impact of major unanticipated disruptions, from natural disasters to sudden economic crises. They're not a backstop for the kind of foreseeable, year-to-year budgetary ups and downs that ought to be part of the routine planning process, and using them that way would set a terrible precedent for the future.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | April 13, 2014
A slowdown in revenue has Baltimore school officials scrambling for budget adjustments that won't require the system to raid its rainy-day fund or cut central office positions and school programs. Officials face a $31 million deficit in next year's budget, due to factors that include a dried up stream of grant funding, fluctuating financial commitments and a halt to rapid growth in enrollment. Now, the school board has asked administrators to come up with alternatives to their proposed budget reductions, which included staff layoffs, breaking contracts and cutbacks to summer school.
NEWS
April 11, 2014
The marvel of Rep. Paul Ryan's budget, which the House of Representatives approved this week, is that for a piece of legislation that's essentially dead on arrival in the Senate, it's going to live on as a political document from now until November. That was the point, of course, but it seems more likely that Republicans will regret its passage than Democrats. Conventional wisdom in Washington is that the GOP has the upper hand in the midterm elections, and polls seem to bear that out. As recently as a few weeks ago, statistical wunderkind Nate Silver viewed Republicans as being the slight favorites to wrest control of the U.S. Senate from the Democrats this year.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, pwood@baltsun.com | April 7, 2014
The Annapolis mayor and city council will hold public hearings on the city's proposed budget Monday night. The hearings are scheduled as part of the council's regular meeting at 7 p.m. at City Hall, 160 Duke of Gloucester St. Mayor Mike Pantelides' budget proposal calls for laying off 13 employees, furloughing other workers and eliminating 20 vacant positions. The proposal has drawn criticism from employees and their union representatives. Pantelides said he's looking forward to hearing from the public.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | April 7, 2014
Sam Brice, a senior engineer who works for the city of Annapolis, told the mayor and city council Monday that residents expect a high level of service from local government. That, he said, requires employees who cost money. "Your employees are your most valuable asset," Brice said. "You have to cherish them and take care of them. " His comment came at a hearing on the first budget proposed by the new mayor, Mike Pantelides - a $96.6 million operating plan that proposes 13 layoffs, eliminates 20 vacant positions and imposes furloughs for all employees.
NEWS
April 6, 2014
Lots of local children either attended or watched the Opening Day ceremonies for the Orioles last week as the team started its season at Camden Yards, but a group of youngsters from Fort Meade had a particularly nice vantage point for the festivities: the field OriolesREACH, the community outreach branch of the ballclub, arranged for 80 youths to line the orange carpet holding Orioles flags during player introductions before the game against the...
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | April 5, 2014
The General Assembly fulfilled its state constitutional duty Saturday by wrapping up action on Gov. Martin O'Malley's nearly $39 billion operating budget. Final approval came as the House and Senate approved the agreement rreached by negotiators for the two chambers. The legislature also ratified a deal on a companion measure that would provide $18.5 million to be available for the state's film tax credit -- considered critical in keeping the production of the Netflix television show House of Cards in Maryland.
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