Advertisement
HomeCollectionsBudget
IN THE NEWS

Budget

ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | June 23, 2014
On Wednesday, Baltimore will relaunch its publicly owned TV station, shifting its focus from broadcasts of government meetings to CharmTV, a showcase for city restaurants, businesses and neighborhoods. City leaders see an opportunity to counteract negative perceptions of Baltimore, but with the change come questions about significantly increased spending on an untested business model - without benefit of data to show how many people watch the station. An extensive publicity campaign from the Mayor's Office of Cable and Communications promises a fresh slate of four locally produced prime-time programs equal in quality to those seen on the Food Network or HGTV, showcasing "all that is proud, inspiring and authentic" about Baltimore food, nightlife, neighborhoods and history.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | June 19, 2014
Los Angeles has Hollywood, two pro basketball teams and some of the country's best beaches. It's also the city with the third highest gross domestic product in the world. But leaders in the West Coast city say they're envious of the fiscal cuts Baltimore has made in recent years - and are hoping to replicate them.   Los Angeles Budget Director Matt Crawford traveled to Baltimore Wednesday to meet with city officials here. Crawford and his team met with Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake, city finance director Harry E. Black and budget chief Andrew Kleine to discuss Baltimore's approach to budgeting, the city's 10-year financial plan and the CitiStat system that tries to hold agencies accountable for their performance.
NEWS
By Joe Burris, The Baltimore Sun | June 19, 2014
The Anne Arundel County school board adopted a $1.02 billion operating budget last week for the next fiscal year that includes funding for employee pay increases and the money to open a new contract school. But the panel criticized county government for taking money from the school system's health fund balance to foot those bills. The board unanimously adopted the operating budget, which falls shy of the $1.04 billion proposal that interim Superintendent Mamie Perkins offered in December.
NEWS
By Chris Wood | June 18, 2014
On Monday, the Chesapeake Executive Council signed the Chesapeake Watershed Agreement, a collaborative effort across multiple states to protect and restore the Chesapeake Bay. But the celebration of the watershed agreement may be premature. Down the road in Congress there is an effort under way to strip the protections of the Clean Water Act from small headwater streams that feed the bay with cold, clean water. The federal government recently proposed a rule to clarify a politically charged Supreme Court ruling which undermined 30 years of protection of the Clean Water Act for small headwater streams.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | June 17, 2014
The Annapolis City Council adopted a $96.5 million operating budget early Tuesday morning that lays off seven employees, increases a tax on businesses and increases some parking fines. The budget also eliminates the Annapolis Economic Development Corp., which was created in 2010 to attract and promote businesses in the city. The agency's funding, which was $450,000 this year, will run out at the end of the month as the fiscal year ends. Businesses could pay up to $150 more per year due to a 17 percent increase in the personal property tax, which is a tax on equipment and merchandise that's paid by all businesses, according to Brian Woodward, acting city manager.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | June 6, 2014
The Anne Arundel County Council approved a spending plan Friday that includes a small property tax break and funding for teacher raises, more police officers and firefighters and additional grants to nonprofit groups. The $1.35 billion operating budget and $242.5 million capital budget go into effect July 1 and will include a property tax cut of 0.7 cents per $100 of assessed value, which amounts to savings of $18.59 per year on a typical county home worth $265,500. The county's income tax and water, sewer and trash rates remain the same.
NEWS
BY ERIKA BUTLER | June 3, 2014
With little fanfare, the Aberdeen City Council passed its $14.08 million budget for the next fiscal year that calls for spending less than in this fiscal year and does not include a property tax rate or water and sewer rate increase. As it passed the budget 4-0 (Councilman Bruce Garner was absent) for fiscal year 2015 during its city council meeting Monday night, the council members adjusted this year's budget to make repairs at the Aberdeen swim club and Ripken Stadium and one councilwoman thanked The Record for its recent editorial.
NEWS
Christian John Lillis | June 2, 2014
Anyone who has lost a loved one has experienced the five stages of grief: denial, anger, bargaining, depression and acceptance. Following my mother's death from one such infection, Clostridium difficile, or C. diff., in April 2010, I went through the stages also. In making the shift from depression to acceptance, my brother and I founded the Peggy Lillis Memorial Foundation to raise awareness of C. diff. In our anger at learning that a disease we'd never heard of, not only claimed our mother, but also kills more than 28,000 Americans every year, we committed to ensuring that her death would not be in vain.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | May 27, 2014
The Baltimore school board voted Tuesday to fully fund programs for gifted students, which were originally slated for cuts next year, and to tap its rainy-day fund to avoid layoffs and cuts to central office operations. The board voted 7-2 to adopt the $1.3 billion budget, which restores more than $30,000 in funding cuts to the International Baccalaureate programs at City College and the Mount Washington School. The system will also maintain the same amount of funding as last year for another gifted program, the Ingenuity Project, which has seen reduced financing from the district in recent years and still cannot accommodate the number of students eligible for the program.
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater and The Baltimore Sun | May 27, 2014
Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake plans to beef up her Billing Integrity Unit, which she's tasked with cracking down on the chronic problem of erroneous tax bills in Baltimore. Created in 2010, the unit is currently staffed by three people. But their ranks will increase to seven employees under the mayor's proposed $2.5 billion Fiscal Year 2015 budget, which the City Council will review at a series of hearings today. The city plans to hire an appraiser, tax analyst, revenue analyst and data manager at a cost of $290,000 to better catch erroneous bills.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.