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NEWS
January 18, 2012
Gov. Martin O'Malley today submitted what is likely to be among the most controversial budget proposals in his two terms in office. Faced with a $1 billion gap between projected spending and revenues, and committed to a goal of finding real solutions to Maryland's persistent budget woes, Mr. O'Malley is now reaching for the hard-to-do ideas, many of which have been kicking around Annapolis for years but have gone nowhere because they were politically unpalatable....
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NEWS
By Erin Cox and Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | January 16, 2013
Gov. Martin O'Malley released a $37 billion spending plan Wednesday that for the first time in recent years contains no drastic cuts or proposed tax increases. Amid a stronger economy, O'Malley also proposed to boost the pay for state workers, expand tax credits for some high-tech industries and set aside more money to clean up the Chesapeake Bay. "These have been challenging years to say the least," O'Malley said. Since the onset of the recession, the state has raised income taxes for the wealthy, increased taxes on alcohol and cigars, expanded gambling, shrunk the state workforce and cut projected spending, among other moves, to close a structural budget gap that once stood at nearly $2 billion.
NEWS
January 26, 2013
Steve Buff's letter in Monday's Sunpaper ("Military spending is bankrupting the country," Jan. 20) was interesting. Finally I see a letter from someone in agreement with my own views. A couple of points: The U.S. military budget is actually over $700 billion which does not include war costs, as these are separate. Also the U.S. military budget is a lot more than the next 20 countries combined, most of which are our allies! Reducing the military budget would of course cost many, many jobs, but I think that they could be replaced with jobs which would invest more in the rejuvenation of America rather than investing in and duplicating waste and destruction that are simply copying what many of our allies are already doing.
NEWS
April 14, 2010
The budget crisis in Baltimore is real. Fortunately, by re-instituting a policy that encourages drunkenness, the good folks at Pimlico have presented the city with a great opportunity to raise some much needed revenue and improve public safety as a by-product. After six or more hours in the all-the-beer-you-can-drink "mug club" in the Preakness infield, many race goers should be easy pickings for a few well placed police with breathalyzers and citation pads. A few hundred DUI fines might help prevent a few city layoffs, and the neighborhoods around the track probably won't mind having a few less post-race drunk drivers on the streets.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | April 9, 2012
Budget negotiators for the Senate and House met briefly Monday afternoon but both sides held fast to entrenched positions over income taxes and made no progress toward a resolution of the issues threatening to push the General Assembly into an extended session for the first time in two decades. The Senate is insisting on a plan under which most taxpayers would pay at least a small amount more in income taxes because of a reduced personal exemption. The House is insisting that individuals making less than $100,000 and joint files making under $150,000 see no increase.
NEWS
August 6, 2012
The Maryland General Assembly is being led like sheep to the slaughterhouse of gambling ("Internet gambling enters debate," Aug. 3). Do lawmakers ever ask themselves why Virginia is enjoying another state budget surplus for the third year in a row? If they opened their eyes they would see that Virginia doesn't have casinos, it relies instead on fiscal restraint and the encouragement of new business development to spur growth. Rushing into a special session about gambling is fool's gold.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | December 17, 2013
A bipartisan budget deal aimed at calming debates over U.S. fiscal policy for the next two years cleared a key vote Tuesday in the Senate, reducing the risks of another government shutdown and spending cuts that would have had an outsized impact in Maryland. But the agreement also sets up a tight timeline for congressional lawmakers - and Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski, chairwoman of the Senate Appropriations Committee, in particular - who now must decide by Jan. 15 how to divvy up $1 trillion-plus in spending.
SPORTS
By Jeff Barker, The Baltimore Sun | June 28, 2010
Last summer, Maryland's athletic teams were facing budget cuts. The revenue-producing sports of men's basketball and football were not spared. Each sport was cut by about 3 percent, and the football team needed financial help from private supporters to avoid having to take a bus to several games instead of flying. This summer, the budget news is brighter. Interim athletic director Randy Eaton said in an interview Monday that the football and men's basketball budgets have been restored to prior levels.
NEWS
By Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | March 15, 2013
The House of Delegates passed Gov. Martin O'Malley's budget virtually unchanged Friday, sending the $37 billion plan to the Senate. The proposal nearly closes a long-term budget gap that once stood at $2 billion, gives raises to state workers for the first time in at least three years and, for the first time in recent history, contains no proposed tax increases. Later Friday, however, lawmakers were scheduled to hold a hearing on a separate plan to raise money for transportation through higher taxes on gas. "Finally, we're on our way out of the tough recessionary times.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | January 25, 2013
U.S. Sen. Benjamin L. Cardin told members of the House of Delegates Friday that he doubts whether the Congress will meet a March 1 deadline for avoiding automatic federal budget cuts. Cardin, who was in Annapolis to meet with the Baltimore city and Prince George's County delegations, said disagreements between the Democratic-led Senate and Republican-dominated House could prevent lawmakers from agreeing on a deficit reduction plan before that time. The automatic cuts, which would take place under a process known as sequestration would affect both military and domestic programs.
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