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NEWS
March 25, 2013
Baltimore City Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake is trying to craft a budget that will trim expenses and property taxes to encourage an increase to the population ("First step to a better Baltimore," March 21). Reducing excessive city employees is a good first step. The big payoff would come from reexamining things the city does that are not done by competing, lower-tax suburbs. The mayor should engage an expert like former county executives Jim Smith of Baltimore County or Doug Duncan of Montgomery County to analyze things the city started doing when it was the largest, wealthiest jurisdiction, many of which enhance suburbanites' quality of life, that are no longer essential or affordable, and use the potential savings to help the city approach suburban tax rates.
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NEWS
By Annie Linskey | annie.linskey@baltsun.com | February 23, 2010
The Maryland prosecutor whose City Hall corruption investigation led to the ouster of former Baltimore Mayor Sheila Dixon said Monday that his office's proposed $1.2 million budget is "paltry" and prevents him from fully vetting allegations of fraud. "It is difficult to understand why the state is reluctant to spend relatively little to attempt to assure the budgeted money is being used as intended," State Prosecutor Robert A. Rohrbaugh said in written testimony to a legislative committee reviewing his agency's spending.
NEWS
February 6, 2012
Much of our current fiscal problem is the result of a stumbling economy, a problem that will work itself out over time. Raising revenue with new and increased taxation is not the way to aid the process of correction. Here is why. Everyone understands that reducing expenses today is a temporary measure. Next year, the legislature can restore the cuts in a heartbeat. But can anyone in Maryland, or the country for that matter, remember when a new or increased tax has been removed?
NEWS
February 15, 2013
Kudos to Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake for facing the un-glamorous reality in her State of the City address this week ("Mayor takes a risk," Feb. 12). It pains me as a life-long resident to have grown pessimistic about the outlook for Baltimore City. Despite regional and national trends, city government has become an anchor preventing us from moving forward and making progress. The way the city delivers services is so firmly rooted in the past, and guarded by narrow special interests, that it is out of alignment with the citizens and those most in need.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper, The Baltimore Sun | January 6, 2011
After two years of spending cuts and $50 million in new taxes, Baltimore still faces an $81 million gap in its $1.2 billion budget, finance officials told the City Council on Thursday. City budget chief Andrew W. Kleine said the shortfall was equal to the cost of keeping more than 1,000 police officers or 1,200 firefighters on duty, an illustration that prompted an outcry from council members still bitter from the rancorous deliberations that led to the current budget. "We went through this last year," Councilman James B. Kraft said.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey, The Baltimore Sun | November 13, 2012
After years of budgetary gloom and shortfalls in the billions of dollars, Maryland's fiscal forecasters offered lawmakers a brighter outlook Tuesday, saying the state's operating budget could be just $27 million in the red next fiscal year. Top fiscal analyst Warren Deschenaux told an Annapolis budget committee that it almost appears that next year's budget "could take care of itself. " The last few years in Annapolis have been wrought with fiscal angst as lawmakers had to close budget gaps in the roughly $16 billion annual spending plan with spending cuts and tax increases.
NEWS
May 14, 2010
Since Baltimore City Council Member Helen L. Holton is bereft of ideas on how to close the city's budget deficit ("Irate citizens protest taxes," May 14), I'll offer two novel ideas free of charge: (1) cut $121 million from the budget, (2) resign and be replaced with someone with the intelligence and leadership necessary to make the tough decisions. Bruce Beasman, Baltimore
NEWS
May 1, 2013
Anne Arundel County Executive Laura Neuman is scheduled to unveil her first-ever county budget on Wednesday in Annapolis. Neuman took over as county executive in February after the resignation of former executive John R. Leopold, following his conviction on misconduct in office charges. On Tuesday at 11 a.m. at the Arundel Center, Neuman is scheduled to deliver a message outlining her proposed budget plan. Then, at 1 p.m., the County Council is slated to hold the first of several budget review sessions. The public is invited to attend the budget review session, but public testimony will not be part of that meeting.  The county will host public hearings on the budget on May 8, 7 to 10 p.m., at the Chesapeake Arts.
NEWS
Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2011
With Baltimore County attempting to cut 200 positions in hopes of saving $15 million for next budget year, city officials say they're also eyeing a dire budget year. Ryan O'Doherty, spokesman for Baltimore Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake, said city budget analysts are predicting a "significant" shortfall this budget cycle – which will cause the mayor to make "difficult reductions" to city government when the budget process begins next spring. "We expect to have budget projections that show a significant shortfall," he said.
NEWS
By Julie Scharper | julie.scharper@baltsun.com | April 8, 2010
Shouting "Save our jobs" and "Save our kids," more than 500 residents, youth advocates and union members streamed into a meeting Wednesday evening to call for Baltimore's top officials to reverse deep cuts to parks and recreation and preserve the jobs of city workers. The impassioned crowd pleaded with leaders to halt plans to close more than half the city's rec centers and swimming and wading pools, and to fully fund the Recreation and Parks Department, which would be eviscerated in a preliminary budget proposed by Mayor Stephanie C. Rawlings-Blake's administration.
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