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By Michael Dresser and The Baltimore Sun | March 20, 2013
Gov. Martin O'Malley's budget for next year was approved by the Senate after an unusually brief debate Wednesday in a sign of the state's improved fiscal condition. Senators voted 42-5 to pass the $36.8 billion budget and send it to a conference committee with the House. All 35 Democrats and seven Republicans voted in favor of the budget, which comes close to eliminating what was once a nearly $2 billion long-term revenue shortfall. "I can't remember any time the budget was adopted by a larger margin.
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NEWS
April 11, 2012
Our state elected officials continue to amaze me - and not in as good way. Our legislature had 90 days to do its work, its most important task being the budget. Ninety days was not long enough to take a hard look at programs and expenses and make the difficult choices necessary to cut spending and balance our budget? Now, we the taxpayers will foot the bill for a special session because our elected officials couldn't do their job? Only in government. Let's take the doomsday budget.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | April 9, 2012
The standoff between the House and Senate on Maryland's budget continued into midday Monday with only 12 hours before the General Assembly is scheduled to end its 90-day session. If the budget isn't passed, the legislature will be force into extended session for the first time since 1992. Senate President Thomas V. Mike Millerinsisted the differences are a matter of philosophy, not personality, and are not related to the issue of expanded gambling. He said he nwould be meeting this afternoon with Gov.Martin O'Malley's top aides to urge that the governor intervene to help resolve the budget issue.
NEWS
Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | March 25, 2014
Maryland House Republicans offered an alternative to Gov. Martin O'Malley's spending plan Tuesday, suggesting the state limit spending to 1 percent above last year. The minority caucus, dramatically outnumbered in the House of Delegates, push an alternative budget every year. This year, House Republicans criticized the governor and state Democrats for diverting some pension payments to help plug budget gaps and for increasing state spending by 5 percent over last year.  During an Annapolis press conference, several Republican delegates criticized the term-limited governor for the the growth of state spending during his tenure.
NEWS
by Annie Linskey | April 10, 2012
The youngest member of Maryland's state senate sent email to constituents Tuesday saying that he was "embarrassed" by the so-called "Doomsday" budget that passed in the General Assembly with his support. Sen. Bill Ferguson, a Baltimore Democrat, said that he cast his green vote on "what we believed" was a compromise spending plan that included a "Doomsday" clause. The budget that passed closes a roughly $1 billion revenue shortfall mostly with cuts, firing hundreds of state workers and making deep cuts in education and other Democratic priorities.
NEWS
By Pamela Wood, The Baltimore Sun | March 10, 2014
Annapolis Mayor Mike Pantelides proposed a budget Monday night that lays off 13 employees, keeps 20 positions vacant and requires worker furloughs. Pantelides proposed his budget before a full house at Annapolis City Hall during Monday's regular city council meeting. Pantelides' proposal includes a $96.6 million operating budget and a $15.8 million capital budget. The mayor said his budget does not raise taxes. This is the first budget proposed by Pantelides, a Republican who beat incumbent Democrat Josh Cohen by 59 votes in November.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser | March 20, 2013
Gov. Martin O'Malley's budget for next year was approved by the Senate after an unusually brief debate Wednesday in a sign of the state's improved fiscal condition. Senators voted 42-5 to pass the $36.8 billion budget and send it to a conference committee with the House. All 35 Democrats and seven Republicans voted in favor of the budget, which comes close to eliminating what was once a nearly $2 billion long-term revenue shortfall. "I can't remember any time the budget was adopted by a larger margin.
NEWS
April 27, 2012
Maryland Senate President Mike "Boss" Miller has now extended the bounds of his seemingly boundless manipulation of Maryland by holding a special session of the General Assembly needed to pass a budget hostage to his lust for table games inPrince George's County("Leaders float the idea of two special sessions," April 25). If the two-session compromise goes into effect, the second session should be held at that fount of political influence, Atlantic City. This will make a great movie someday; one only hopes that John Goodman will be available to play the Boss.
EXPLORE
April 26, 2012
The muddle that is Maryland's budget future cleared a bit this week as the three most important people in cleaning up the mess edged closer to an agreement on how to do so. The mess, of course, was left by state lawmakers when they ended the 2012 legislative session April 9 without reaching an agreement on next year's budget. This week, Gov. Martin O'Malley, Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller and House Speaker Michael Busch emerged from a morning meeting to reveal the outline of a solution, one that would involve two special legislative sessions for lawmakers, one to deal with the budget, the other to consider expanding casino gambling in Maryland.
NEWS
Erin Cox and The Baltimore Sun | December 18, 2013
State lawmakers will have to address a combined budget gap of $580 million over the next 18 months when they reconvene in January. The state's chief analyst on Wednesday described the problem as relatively small given the nearly $2 billion shortfall the state grappled with in recent years. "We are starting in a small hole, certainly compared to what we have seen in the past," Warren Deschenaux, director of the office of policy analysis in the Department of Legislative Services, said to the Spending Affordability Committee.
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