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By Joel Havemann and Joel Havemann,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 17, 2005
WASHINGTON - A letter signed by 44 House Republicans protesting proposed Medicaid cuts emerged Friday as a serious threat to plans by President Bush and GOP leaders to curtail spending on a range of benefit programs. The Medicaid fight could hinder Congress' ability to pass this year's budget resolution, which sets spending for federal programs and includes a new round of tax cuts and legislation to open the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge to oil drilling. The House and Senate passed different versions of a fiscal 2006 budget a month ago, with four votes to spare in the House and two in the Senate.
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NEWS
By Noam Levey and Noam Levey,Tribune Washington Bureau | April 25, 2009
WASHINGTON -Potentially removing a major obstacle to the sweeping health care legislation sought by President Barack Obama, senior Democrats on Capitol Hill have reached broad agreement on a plan to prevent Republicans from blocking such legislation later this year, according to congressional officials. The plan, which would use special provisions of the budget process to prevent a GOP filibuster in the Senate, threatens to sow outrage among GOP lawmakers and could complicate Democrats' efforts to push through the rest of their agenda.
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NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 17, 1997
WASHINGTON -- The balanced budget agreement between the White House and Congress began its path toward formal approval yesterday amid signs that plenty of battles will yet be waged before it becomes law.Even as President Clinton and Republican congressional leaders congratulated themselves on translating their 2-week-old handshake into a written accord, they displayed sharp disagreements over how Clinton's education proposals will be reflected in the tax...
NEWS
By Joel Havemann and Joel Havemann,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 18, 2007
WASHINGTON -- The House and Senate approved yesterday a $2.9 trillion federal budget blueprint that, depending on whom you asked, contained the second-largest tax increase in history or no tax increase at all. How are such different readings of one document possible? It could happen only in the world of Washington budget-speak, where political spin is at least as important as fiscal reality. The new budget resolution, the first to make its way through Congress since the Democrats took control in January, in addition to almost $3 trillion in spending, anticipates just under $2.7 trillion in revenues, leaving a projected deficit of about $250 billion.
NEWS
April 6, 2001
IT'S ALWAYS wise to make sure there's water in the pool before you jump off the diving board. Yet the Bush administration has convinced Republicans in Congress they can safely take that leap without checking the pool's water level. Such hasty moves can be dangerous to the nation's health. The Republican-controlled House has brusquely shoved aside all Democratic protests and given President Bush what he wants -- an extensive across-the-board tax cut, a costly plan to reduce the so-called marriage-penalty tax and gradual elimination of the estate tax for the well-to-do.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,Washington Bureau Staff writer Carl Cannon contributed to this article | March 19, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Democrats in the House of Representatives united last night to give the first big boost to President Clinton's painful prescription to shore up the nation's economy.By a 243-183 vote that included no Republican support, the House approved a budget resolution that authorizes federal spending of $1.5 trillion in fiscal 1994 and contains the five-year .. blueprint for Mr. Clinton's program to cut the deficit and finance new investment by sharply raising taxes.House support was almost as strong for the $16.3 billion dollar stimulus package, a short-term element of Mr. Clinton's program that became unexpectedly controversial because it calls for new spending that adds to the budget deficit.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,Washington Bureau | March 25, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Try as it might to disguise it, the Senate i about to join President Clinton today in his crusade to sharply raise taxes in order to cut the deficit and finance new social spending.With a final vote this morning on its version of Mr. Clinton's budget blueprint, the Senate will endorse raising taxes on Social Security recipients, imposing a new BTU tax on energy, freezing federal workers' pay and shifting spending priorities from defense to social programs.The differences between the House and Senate versions of the budget resolution are so minor that a conference next week to produce a single plan will not need to make any major revisions of the Clinton blueprint.
NEWS
By Carol Emert and Carol Emert,States News Service | April 1, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Cost-of-living adjustments for federal retirees 62 and older were left untouched in the budget resolution compromise worked out between the House and Senate, but pensioners under 62 will receive only half their regular COLAs.Under the compromise, federal retirees under 62 will permanently lose half of their yearly COLAs, and the adjustments will be capped at $400 annually. An exception was made for workers, such as law enforcement officers and firefighters, who are required to retire at 55.A retiree's full COLA would be restored when he or she reached 62, according to information from the Federal Government Service Task Force.
NEWS
By Noam Levey and Noam Levey,Tribune Washington Bureau | April 25, 2009
WASHINGTON -Potentially removing a major obstacle to the sweeping health care legislation sought by President Barack Obama, senior Democrats on Capitol Hill have reached broad agreement on a plan to prevent Republicans from blocking such legislation later this year, according to congressional officials. The plan, which would use special provisions of the budget process to prevent a GOP filibuster in the Senate, threatens to sow outrage among GOP lawmakers and could complicate Democrats' efforts to push through the rest of their agenda.
NEWS
By JEFF SHEAR | August 6, 1995
As the Senate was about to vote on a resolution to balance the federal budget by 2002, Rep. John R. Kasich, Republican of Ohio, slipped into the Senate chamber. Grinning happily, arms folded across his chest, the spirited young chairman of the Budget Committee looked upon a scene of Republican triumph, not unlike the one he had helped engineer a week earlier in the House.Senate Budget Committee Chairman Pete V. Domenici, Republican of New Mexico, spotted him standing at the center door and strode up to the aisle to meet him. The two men grabbed each other in a bear hug.They made a striking contrast.
NEWS
By NEWT GINGRICH AND ROBERT EGGE | June 5, 2006
WASHINGTON -- Is saving someone you know from cancer worth $16 to you? Congress doesn't seem to think so. Despite the heavy toll cancer inflicts on our nation each year, the House of Representatives' pending budget resolution would cut $40 million from the budget of the National Cancer Institute. Finding a cure for cancer should be a top concern of Congress. Consider for a moment the devastating impact cancer has on our country: Cancer killed more than half a million Americans last year; it is this country's second-leading cause of death.
NEWS
By Joel Havemann and Joel Havemann,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 17, 2005
WASHINGTON - A letter signed by 44 House Republicans protesting proposed Medicaid cuts emerged Friday as a serious threat to plans by President Bush and GOP leaders to curtail spending on a range of benefit programs. The Medicaid fight could hinder Congress' ability to pass this year's budget resolution, which sets spending for federal programs and includes a new round of tax cuts and legislation to open the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge to oil drilling. The House and Senate passed different versions of a fiscal 2006 budget a month ago, with four votes to spare in the House and two in the Senate.
NEWS
By Joel Havemann and Maura Reynolds and Joel Havemann and Maura Reynolds,LOS ANGELES TIMES | January 24, 2005
WASHINGTON - The battle to control the federal deficit is shifting ground, ever so slowly, to Social Security, Medicare and the other giant benefit programs that account for a growing share of spending. President Bush, in the fiscal 2006 budget that he is to present to Congress on Feb. 7, is expected to resurrect a failed proposal from last year that calls for any increases in benefit programs to be offset by decreases of equal size from other benefit programs. But congressional Republicans may try to get out ahead of him. Although lawmakers have no firm targets for benefit cuts, at least one influential senator - Budget Committee Chairman Judd Gregg of New Hampshire - is laying plans to institute a procedure that would make it harder for Democrats to block benefit cuts.
NEWS
April 6, 2001
IT'S ALWAYS wise to make sure there's water in the pool before you jump off the diving board. Yet the Bush administration has convinced Republicans in Congress they can safely take that leap without checking the pool's water level. Such hasty moves can be dangerous to the nation's health. The Republican-controlled House has brusquely shoved aside all Democratic protests and given President Bush what he wants -- an extensive across-the-board tax cut, a costly plan to reduce the so-called marriage-penalty tax and gradual elimination of the estate tax for the well-to-do.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 17, 1997
WASHINGTON -- The balanced budget agreement between the White House and Congress began its path toward formal approval yesterday amid signs that plenty of battles will yet be waged before it becomes law.Even as President Clinton and Republican congressional leaders congratulated themselves on translating their 2-week-old handshake into a written accord, they displayed sharp disagreements over how Clinton's education proposals will be reflected in the tax...
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 6, 1997
WASHINGTON -- When Congress fills in the details of the budget deal struck by President Clinton and Republican leaders, there is likely to be less of everything than its backers expect -- less tax relief, less deficit reduction, less spending for social programs.Clinton and the GOP leadership made so many promises to build bipartisan support for the broad outlines of the agreement, announced Friday in Baltimore, that it may be impossible to redeem them all.Thus, while Congress is expected to easily approve the nonbinding budget resolution endorsing the spending blueprint by Memorial Day, there are likely to be some nasty fights ahead as the various factions who supported the deal try to collect their chits.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,Washington Bureau | April 4, 1993
WASHINGTON -- A Senate showdown that threatens to forc President Clinton into an embarrassing retreat on his short-term jobs bill has eclipsed the huge victory he scored last week on a far more important component of his economic program.When the lawmakers agreed Thursday in a budget resolution to produce $496 billion worth of spending cuts and tax increases over the next five years, they signed on to the president's crusade to cut the budget deficit in half and reorder the nation's priorities.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 6, 1997
WASHINGTON -- When Congress fills in the details of the budget deal struck by President Clinton and Republican leaders, there is likely to be less of everything than its backers expect -- less tax relief, less deficit reduction, less spending for social programs.Clinton and the GOP leadership made so many promises to build bipartisan support for the broad outlines of the agreement, announced Friday in Baltimore, that it may be impossible to redeem them all.Thus, while Congress is expected to easily approve the nonbinding budget resolution endorsing the spending blueprint by Memorial Day, there are likely to be some nasty fights ahead as the various factions who supported the deal try to collect their chits.
NEWS
By JEFF SHEAR | August 6, 1995
As the Senate was about to vote on a resolution to balance the federal budget by 2002, Rep. John R. Kasich, Republican of Ohio, slipped into the Senate chamber. Grinning happily, arms folded across his chest, the spirited young chairman of the Budget Committee looked upon a scene of Republican triumph, not unlike the one he had helped engineer a week earlier in the House.Senate Budget Committee Chairman Pete V. Domenici, Republican of New Mexico, spotted him standing at the center door and strode up to the aisle to meet him. The two men grabbed each other in a bear hug.They made a striking contrast.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,Washington Bureau of The Sun | May 19, 1995
WASHINGTON -- The Republicans took an important step toward balancing the federal budget yesterday when the House approved a spending blueprint that promises to cut taxes and eliminate the deficit by 2002.The savings in the budget resolution would come largely from slowing the growth of Medicare and Medicaid and by slashing a wide swath through the federal bureaucracy, wiping out hundreds of programs. The GOP plan sets the outlines for more than $1 trillion in spending cuts over seven years; the details would be determined by Congress late this summer.
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