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NEWS
August 6, 2012
The Maryland General Assembly is being led like sheep to the slaughterhouse of gambling ("Internet gambling enters debate," Aug. 3). Do lawmakers ever ask themselves why Virginia is enjoying another state budget surplus for the third year in a row? If they opened their eyes they would see that Virginia doesn't have casinos, it relies instead on fiscal restraint and the encouragement of new business development to spur growth. Rushing into a special session about gambling is fool's gold.
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NEWS
By Michael Dresser | October 3, 2014
The Baltimore Sun Democrat Anthony G. Brown delivered a message about the constraints of budget pressures as he appeared Friday before a group of advocates for child and family programs. Republican gubernatorial candidate Larry Hogan also was scheduled to appear at the forum at Towson University, but organizers said Hogan canceled Thursday night because he was sick. Brown told advocates at the Maryland Family Network event that he is firmly committed to their priorities. "There will always be a role for us in the public sector, working with the nonprofit community, to see that there's a backstop" for families in need, Brown said.
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NEWS
By John W. Frece and John W. Frece,Annapolis Bureau of The Sun Ginger Thompson of The Sun's metropolitan staff contributed to this article | November 6, 1991
ANNAPOLIS -- Legislative leaders laid the preliminary groundwork yesterday for what they hope will be a collaborative VTC effort with the governor to develop a comprehensive tax and spending plan to extricate Maryland from its seemingly endless budget problems.Although discussions are still in the tentative stage, key lawmakers said they expect to hold as many as three hearings around the state to gather public opinion on spending priorities and tax concerns. They then hope to meet with Gov. William Donald Schaefer to develop a proposal that would be considered by the 1992 General Assembly.
NEWS
By Rebecca Wagner and Bruce Lesley | December 16, 2012
As the federal "fiscal cliff" approaches, an important group of Marylanders with a lot on the line has been largely ignored: children. The stakes are immense, because the recession has been hard on Maryland children, with one out of every seven living in poverty. A recent analysis by the nonpartisan Urban Institute found that nearly 120,000 Maryland children live with an unemployed parent - about triple the population of Annapolis. Compared to 2007, that's a 180 percent increase, and when you look at kids living with a long-term unemployed parent, the increase is 320 percent.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and Greg Garland and David Nitkin and Greg Garland,SUN STAFF | January 28, 2004
House Speaker Michael E. Busch rebuffed Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.'s revised gambling plan yesterday, saying the House of Delegates should not approve slot machines without a full remedy to state budget problems that would include raising taxes. "If it's not a comprehensive solution, why take up the issue of slots?" Busch said, adding that he didn't mind being criticized as an obstructionist - an accusation levied by the governor and Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller when the governor's slots bill died in the House last year.
NEWS
March 3, 2011
I'm not sure what all the fuss is about regarding the government shutdown. I think the solution is quite simple: Just pay all the regular government workers their regular pay and let them continue to work — and furlough all the members of Congress. Those lawmakers should have to work around the clock without compensation instead of continuing to get paid and not resolving anything. Once they solve the budget problems they can resume getting paid. And bingo! They will "magically" come to consensus and have it solved in a day or two. David Fogle, Catonsville
NEWS
March 15, 2011
Look at what the idiotic Democrats and Republicans are doing in Washington about the budget problems. They are making a big deal about 12 percent of the federal budget and trying to make the public think they are doing their job. What disgusting idiots. What about the 47 percent of the budget that is growing daily? I'm referring, of course, to Social Security, Medicare and Medicaid. But the morons we elected are only willing to look at things like Head Start and PBS. No wonder I'm registered as an independent.
NEWS
By Rick Todhunter and Rick Todhunter,States News Service | August 29, 1991
Most of Maryland's counties are planning to make up for budget shortcomings by cutting their spending, according to a new report.The National Association of Counties' "County Government Budget Shortfall Report," just released, claims that three-fourths Maryland's counties fell short of their proposed budgets in fiscal year 1991. The report says that of those counties, exactly half will close the budgetary gap by cutting spending.The association, which studied budget problems in 443 of the nation's largest counties, said that the other half of Maryland's counties experiencing budgetary problems planned to create revenue as well as cut spending to "offset the imbalance."
NEWS
December 29, 1991
1991 the year the recession arrived in Howard County. People were laid off in previous years, but in 1991, everyone seemed to have a problem with personal budgets as well as the county, state and national budgets.County Executive Charles I. Ecker's budget problems top the Howard County Sun's 10 most important stories of 1991. The second story,the schools' budget problems, could just as easily be numbered 1A.And by no means are the problems over. If 1991 was the year the recession arrived, 1992 may be the year it takes root.
NEWS
March 5, 2002
HAVING PAINTED themselves into a painfully tight revenue corner, the Maryland General Assembly should go along with a proposal to raise taxes on cigarettes. A more honest approach to budgeting would have started with the politically difficult decision to delay or even cancel the last year of an income tax cut. But this is an election year, so the Assembly chose to complete the tax-cut cycle at the cost of a $175-million hole. Hence their budget problems and the cigarette tax option. The proposed doubling of the current 66-cents-per-package tax would raise as much as $200 million.
NEWS
August 6, 2012
The Maryland General Assembly is being led like sheep to the slaughterhouse of gambling ("Internet gambling enters debate," Aug. 3). Do lawmakers ever ask themselves why Virginia is enjoying another state budget surplus for the third year in a row? If they opened their eyes they would see that Virginia doesn't have casinos, it relies instead on fiscal restraint and the encouragement of new business development to spur growth. Rushing into a special session about gambling is fool's gold.
NEWS
July 28, 2012
It was refreshing to read Thomas F. Schaller's commentary about the burden of America's superpower status ("America should give up its role as lone superpower," July 25). Mr. Schaller was a bit too reserved in his criticism, however. While he points out that our military budget dwarfs all others, he falls into that trap of attributing it to "defense spending. " The Defense Department, which used to be called the Department of War, is actually involved in offensive operations. The invasions of Grenada, Panama and Iraq were classic examples of warmongering that had nothing to do with defending the country.
NEWS
March 22, 2011
For all the talk of tough choices from Gov. Martin O'Malley, the outcry from education advocates, the protests by state workers and the complaints from Republicans about new fees, you might get the impression that the budget the House of Delegates is set to start debating Wednesday represents a collective biting of the bullet to put Maryland back on sustainable fiscal footing. You'd be wrong. Both Governor O'Malley's proposal and the revised version approved by the House Appropriations Committee make real progress on that front — more than the state has seen since the start of the recession — but a huge problem remains.
NEWS
March 15, 2011
Look at what the idiotic Democrats and Republicans are doing in Washington about the budget problems. They are making a big deal about 12 percent of the federal budget and trying to make the public think they are doing their job. What disgusting idiots. What about the 47 percent of the budget that is growing daily? I'm referring, of course, to Social Security, Medicare and Medicaid. But the morons we elected are only willing to look at things like Head Start and PBS. No wonder I'm registered as an independent.
NEWS
March 3, 2011
I'm not sure what all the fuss is about regarding the government shutdown. I think the solution is quite simple: Just pay all the regular government workers their regular pay and let them continue to work — and furlough all the members of Congress. Those lawmakers should have to work around the clock without compensation instead of continuing to get paid and not resolving anything. Once they solve the budget problems they can resume getting paid. And bingo! They will "magically" come to consensus and have it solved in a day or two. David Fogle, Catonsville
NEWS
February 7, 2011
It didn't take long for certain State House tongues — not all of them Democratic — to start wagging after Del. Jeannie Haddaway-Riccio's official Republican response to Gov. Martin O'Malley's State of the State address last week. The charge was hypocrisy in the first degree, and the critics believed they caught the Eastern Shore delegate in a classic "do what I say, not what I do" moment. In her speech, Delegate Haddaway-Riccio suggested that with the state facing a projected $1.6 billion deficit, lawmakers should forgo the General Assembly's version of earmarks, the $15 million in local bond bills included in the capital budget each year.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | March 8, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The National Institutes of Health needs to improve management of its AIDS research program to deal with budget problems even as the epidemic continues to spread, says a two-year study made public yesterday by Institute of Medicine.The report by the institute, which is part of the National Academy of Sciences, praised the health institutes for "unprecedented speed" in responding to the epidemic. "Never has so much been learned so quickly about any disease," said Dr. William H. Danforth, chairman of the committee that wrote the report.
NEWS
September 29, 1992
Howard County Executive Charles I. Ecker has no stomach for a fight with Gov. William Donald Schaefer over the state's current budget problems.Mr. Ecker says he's resigned to the current crisis and asks only that the cuts be spread equitably among counties and that the state begin a systematic restructuring that will avoid painful and unexpected budget shortfalls in the future.Given Mr. Ecker's rational approach, what is left now is to consider the effects all of this will have on county residents and the services they have come to expect.
NEWS
April 20, 2010
Baltimore took an important step to increase the city's vibrancy last year when it expanded the ability of bars and restaurants to offer live entertainment. But left somewhat unresolved were the more unsavory aspects of the nightlife we do have. After all, "vibrant city" and "drunken people vomiting in flowerpots" don't really go together. That's why City Council President Bernard C. "Jack" Young's attention to the issue of nuisance crimes in some of Baltimore's bar-hoppingest neighborhoods is so important.
NEWS
January 14, 2010
The opening of the 90-day General Assembly session in Maryland is a lot like the first day of school -- everybody's happy to see each other and, for a moment, it seems like they might all be friends. Gov. Martin O'Malley noted this in his remarks to the state Senate. "The opening day of the session is the time when partisanship is at its lowest ebb and citizenship is at its highest ebb, and that's what we need to move forward." That spirit had been on display a few moments before when Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller was re-elected to his post -- for the 24th consecutive time, largely a formality.
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