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NEWS
January 9, 2013
Once again, The Sun is lambasting Republicans for using the debt ceiling to attempt to reduce government spending ("Another cliff ahead?" Jan. 4). Yet you yourself suggest what's needed to reduce the deficit: "Stop spending so much money. " Great idea. Now please tell us what proposals have been put forth by President Barack Obama and Congressional Democrats to reduce spending and reform entitlement programs? Even The Sun seems to doubt the Democrats' resolve to "face up to the challenges facing popular programs like Medicare and Social Security.
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NEWS
Staff Reports | February 26, 2014
County Executive Laura Neuman will host a town hall meeting regarding the upcoming county budget process tonight, Wednesday, Feb. 26, at the Deale Community Library, 5940 Deale Churchton Road from 6 p.m. to 7 p.m. All residents are invited to atend. For more information contact Kristy Altomare at  410-222-1095  or kaltomare@aacounty.org . Those who require accommodations may contact Jill Bezek at 410-222-4383  or Maryland Relay 711, or email at  agbeze83@aacounty.org . Materials are available in alternative formats upon request.
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NEWS
By Peter Morici | January 2, 2013
Friday, forecasters expect the Labor Department to report the economy added 155,000 jobs in December - substantially less than is needed to pull unemployment down to acceptable levels. The tax and spending package passed by the Senate and House provides little prospect of improvement, as the U.S. economy continues to suffer from insufficient demand and will continue growing at a subpar 2 percent a year. Factors contributing to weak demand and slow jobs creation are the huge trade deficits with China and other Asian exporters, as well as on oil. However, on the supply side, increased business regulations, rising health care costs and mandates imposed by Obamacare - and now higher taxes on small businesses - discourage investments that raise productivity and competitiveness and create jobs.
NEWS
By Matthew Hay Brown, The Baltimore Sun | February 21, 2014
— After a year that saw sequestration, furloughs and a partial government shutdown, half of the federal workforce is considering leaving for the private sector, a marketing firm has found. The top reasons they are thinking about a move, according to a survey of current federal workers by Market Connections Inc.: a three-year pay freeze, the political environment in Washington and the lure of a better salary in the private sector. Market Connections surveyed employees from mid-December to mid-January, when Washington was offering the workforce a few glimmers of hope: Congress was negotiating a budget deal that eased sequestration cuts and reduced the likelihood of more furloughs or another shutdown, and President Barack Obama ordered a 1 percent pay raise for federal employees . Still, the results reflect continuing insecurity and frustration among workers.
NEWS
December 11, 2013
At first glance, it would be tempting to condemn the bipartisan budget agreement announced late Tuesday by Rep. Paul Ryan and Sen. Patty Murray, if only because it asks further sacrifice of the unemployed and of federal workers . Those are hardly the two groups on whose backs the rollback of certain untenable sequestration cuts should be made. Extending unemployment benefits at a time of high unemployment used to be a given in this country no matter one's political leanings. But now it appears that there's no touching the hearts of Congressional Scrooges this year.
NEWS
By John Fritze and Lisa Mascaro, The Baltimore Sun | December 10, 2013
Congressional negotiators announced a $1.01 trillion budget agreement on Tuesday that would avoid another government shutdown but deliver an additional round of cuts to federal employees in Maryland. The two-year deal would replace $63 billion in across-the-board spending cuts known as sequestration with more targeted budget changes, including higher retirement contributions for newly hired federal workers and an increase in airline ticket fees. In a rare moment of bipartisanship, President Barack Obama and House Republican leaders expressed support for the plan, noting that it would end a cycle of budget brinkmanship that has gripped Washington for three years and that led to a 16-day government shutdown in early October.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,Washington Bureau of The Sun | December 18, 1990
WASHINGTON -- He is reputed to be America's most eloquent officeholder. But Gov. Mario M. Cuomo gave his assessment of Washington politicians yesterday as any true New Yorker would: with a Bronx cheer.Mr. Cuomo, in an address to the National Press Club, challenged President Bush to "change course" and make a new stab at closing the federal budget gap when Congress reconvenes next month. Further reductions in the federal deficit are needed, he said, to allow the Federal Reserve to lower interest rates and stimulate the economy.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 24, 1997
WASHINGTON -- The Senate broke into applause yesterday when large majorities of Republicans as well as Democrats approved the blueprint of a budget deal that Republican leaders struck with the White House. But their goodwill was a mask.Congress left town for a 10-day holiday recess without reconciling the House and Senate versions of the plan or approving a disaster-relief bill for Midwest flood victims. Instead, lawmakers got caught up in the same partisan bickering that characterized the standoffs of the last Congress.
NEWS
May 3, 1997
ONLY A Democratic president who had proclaimed the end of big government and a Republican congressional leadership with mint-quality conservative credentials could have put together the balanced budget deal announced yesterday.The left and right fringes of their parties will fight it, and so will some of the mainstream. Months of hard bargaining lie ahead. At the end will come a series of trade-offs and compromises that may balance the budget in 2002 but could open the way to astronomical deficits thereafter.
NEWS
By Peter Osterlund and Peter Osterlund,Washington Bureau of The Sun | October 8, 1990
WASHINGTON -- Democratic leaders predicted yesterday that Congress would settle on a new budget agreement in time to avert the brunt of a full-scale shutdown of the federal government tomorrow.The leaders predicted that the new budget plan, which would lessen the reduction in Medicare benefits and the increase in excise taxes contemplated by the budget accord unveiled last Sunday, would be ready for a House vote last night. The Senate was to take up the plan today."We're hopeful," said House Manority Leader Richard A. hTC Gephardt, D-Mo.
BUSINESS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins, The Baltimore Sun | January 9, 2014
Prepare for a year of more in the real estate industry - more improvement, mostly, but also more expense as mortgage rates, prices and rents rise. Analysts expect a solid 2014 here and nationally, after a year in which the battered housing market got on firmer footing. They predict home values will continue rising and expect to see more choices for home buyers as higher prices pull in more would-be sellers. Moody's Analytics is forecasting an 8 percent rise in average home prices in the Baltimore region this year, compared with a 5.6 percent increase last year.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | January 5, 2014
Facing a backlash from veterans, lawmakers in both parties — including several in Maryland — are reconsidering a cut to military retiree pensions that they approved last month as part of a rare bipartisan budget agreement. Several proposals have been introduced to tweak or roll back the $6 billion cut to annual cost-of-living adjustments — or COLAs — for working-age military retirees. The issue is gaining prominence as lawmakers prepare to return to Washington this week. The two-year budget agreement "was necessary to avert another government shutdown but we hope the [retiree]
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | December 16, 2013
It may have been a long time coming, but President Barack Obama's decision to stand up to the obstructionists in Congress that led to the 16-day government shutdown in October has begun to pay off. House Budget Committee Chairman Paul Ryan, recognizing the self-inflicted damage his Republican Party suffered then, has confronted the tea party and other naysayers who caused that shutdown by striking a compromise on a very modest budget deal....
NEWS
December 11, 2013
At first glance, it would be tempting to condemn the bipartisan budget agreement announced late Tuesday by Rep. Paul Ryan and Sen. Patty Murray, if only because it asks further sacrifice of the unemployed and of federal workers . Those are hardly the two groups on whose backs the rollback of certain untenable sequestration cuts should be made. Extending unemployment benefits at a time of high unemployment used to be a given in this country no matter one's political leanings. But now it appears that there's no touching the hearts of Congressional Scrooges this year.
NEWS
By John Fritze and Lisa Mascaro, The Baltimore Sun | December 10, 2013
Congressional negotiators announced a $1.01 trillion budget agreement on Tuesday that would avoid another government shutdown but deliver an additional round of cuts to federal employees in Maryland. The two-year deal would replace $63 billion in across-the-board spending cuts known as sequestration with more targeted budget changes, including higher retirement contributions for newly hired federal workers and an increase in airline ticket fees. In a rare moment of bipartisanship, President Barack Obama and House Republican leaders expressed support for the plan, noting that it would end a cycle of budget brinkmanship that has gripped Washington for three years and that led to a 16-day government shutdown in early October.
NEWS
By John Fritze and The Baltimore Sun | December 6, 2013
Sen. Ben Cardin sent a letter to Democratic Senate leaders Thursday expressing outrage over reports that a budget deal developing in Congress may include further cuts to the federal workforce -- the latest member of Maryland's delegation to push back on the possibilities of those cuts. Lawmakers in states with a high concentration of federal employees are reacting to rumors that negotiators are considering a 5.5 percentage point increase in how much federal employees would contribute toward retirement plans.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 25, 1997
WASHINGTON -- As they say of second marriages, the balanced budget deal that both houses of Congress overwhelmingly endorsed last week appears to be a triumph of hope -- and politics -- over experience.Of five much-trumpeted deficit-reduction plans enacted over the past 16 years, none ever succeeded in balancing the budget. The latest accord has the potential to be the most ineffective of the lot, many lawmakers warned during the debate last week.They argue that it is chock-full of expensive goodies, puts off all necessary pain and even repeals an effective belt-tightening device of the past: limits on most categories of government spending.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey, The Baltimore Sun | April 20, 2012
Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller says he wants a "modification" to a budget deal that General Assembly conferees signed hours before the legislative session ended in confusion last week. In a letter to Gov. Martin O'Malley and House Speaker Michael E. Busch, Miller says he believes the General Assembly should increase income taxes on people with adjusted gross incomes of more than $75,000. House and Senate budget conferees had agreed to a plan to raise taxes on individuals with incomes of more than $100,000.
NEWS
By David Horsey | September 16, 2013
Texas Sen. Ted Cruz is got attention last week for saying two stunningly ignorant things: that the Senate needs 100 members just like the late Sen. Jesse Helms and that a government shutdown at the end of this month would be no big deal. His comment about North Carolina's Helms is fairly inconsequential. If he thinks the Senate would be a better institution if it were composed of 100 unrepentant, bigoted segregationists, that is his business. But his willingness to let the federal government stop functioning for any amount of time is everyone's business, and it is consequential because Mr. Cruz is one of the leaders of the tea party faction of congressional Republicans that is merrily sprinting toward that cliff.
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