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Budget Battle

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NEWS
September 12, 2013
As concern over the August chemical attack in Syria heated up and the U.S. was plunged into a debate over the use of military force to punish Syria for its use of internationally banned weapons of mass destruction and terrorism, House leaders wisely indicated that the ongoing standoff over the federal budget and defunding Obamacare - and the real possibility of a government shutdown - would have to be postponed. A stopgap bill, something to keep the government running past the end of the fiscal year on October 1 and into mid-December, was the choice of House Speaker John Boehner and Majority Leader Eric Cantor.
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NEWS
September 12, 2013
As concern over the August chemical attack in Syria heated up and the U.S. was plunged into a debate over the use of military force to punish Syria for its use of internationally banned weapons of mass destruction and terrorism, House leaders wisely indicated that the ongoing standoff over the federal budget and defunding Obamacare - and the real possibility of a government shutdown - would have to be postponed. A stopgap bill, something to keep the government running past the end of the fiscal year on October 1 and into mid-December, was the choice of House Speaker John Boehner and Majority Leader Eric Cantor.
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NEWS
By Jules Witcover | April 18, 2011
Now that Congress has gotten past the fight over a threatened government shutdown, it's moving on to the next trench warfare on deficit reduction, with more clouds of calamitous stalemate hanging over it. Just as in that first fight, House Speaker John Boehner is embarking on political blackmail to achieve deeper spending cuts, saying categorically that the House majority will not raise the federal debt limit on which U.S. global credibility rests...
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | March 3, 2013
Days after the Obama administration threatened widespread furloughs of government employees, one of Maryland's largest federal agencies, the Social Security Administration, said it might shoulder across-the-board spending cuts without sending any of its full-time employees home. And the federal funding cuts that U.S. education officials say would have the most immediate impact on public schools nationwide would trim only about $440,000 from Maryland districts - less than 1 percent of the combined operating budgets of the systems that receive it. After weeks of dire warnings about the economic impact of the $85 billion in cuts known as the sequester, the White House and Democrats in Congress now face another pressing task: Convincing the public that the alarms they sounded were justified and the pain they cautioned against is real - or will be. The time to make that case is short.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby | October 28, 1990
Maryland's defense industry took some hits in the latest defense budget battle, but appears to have emerged in good shape for future fights.The $288.3 billion defense authorization bill approved by Congress this week was $19 billion less than the Bush administration requested, and Maryland companies are sharing in the belt-tightening.Executives at Martin Marietta Corp.'s headquarters in Bethesda probably got the biggest scare when the Senate terminated the company's contract for the development and production of its Air Defense Anti-Tank System, or ADATS.
NEWS
By JEAN MARBELLA | October 30, 2007
OK, so maybe no one listens to a mere newspaper columnist. But what about a world-renowned management guru, someone who has sold more than 15 million copies of his book, The 7 Habits of Highly Effective People, advised Fortune 500 companies and presidents alike, and been part of the reading list for an MBA class that Oprah Winfrey once taught? Would you listen to that guy? Would you listen to Stephen R. Covey? I'd been feeling rather pessimistic about the special session of the General Assembly that got under way last night, mainly because of all the preliminary bickering - over Gov. Martin O'Malley's plan for making up a projected $1.7 billion budget shortfall, over whether taxes need to be raised or if spending could just be cut, over legalizing slots, over whether to even have the special session at all. You need a scorecard just to keep track of all the combatants in the budget battle - O'Malley vs. the comptroller, Peter Franchot; Senate President Mike Miller vs. House Speaker Mike Busch; Democrats vs. Republicans; Democrats vs. Democrats - so how on earth were all these warring parties going to come to any sort of agreement?
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,Sun Staff Writer | May 17, 1995
Howard County's budget battle is nearly over -- with the schools losing -- but the larger war between county and school officials over control of school funds has just begun.The schools will receive $4.4 million less than they requested in operating funds and $6 million less than they sought for capital projects in the budget that the County Council is to approve tentatively today, county and school officials said yesterday.Formal ratification of the $328.5 million operating budget and $95.7 million capital budget for next fiscal year is set for Friday.
NEWS
June 23, 1998
THIS YEAR'S budget battle in Howard County again showed school Superintendent Michael E. Hickey's skill as a political operative.For instance, Dr. Hickey disapproved of how some teachers involved students in the budget fight by giving them extra credit if they joined the protest. But he voiced his displeasure after the desired effect was achieved by having children beg the County Council for more school money.This tactic worked. So did public discussion of draconian cuts -- unlikely to be approved by the school board -- to reduce spending to the level recommended by County Executive Charles I. Ecker.
NEWS
By James M. Coram and James M. Coram,Staff writer | April 22, 1992
The winds of a budget battle started blowing across the county Monday shortly after County Executive Charles I. Ecker sent the council a $270.2 million proposed operating budget for fiscal 1993.The proposal holds the line on services and does not increase local taxes. Itprovides raises for all but about 60 of the county's 1,760 non-school-system employees.While it is $6.8 million less than department heads asked for, itis still $15.3 million more than their budgets were reduced during fiscal 1992.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,Staff Writer | March 24, 1993
Baltimore County Superintendent Stuart Berger's first budget battle with the Hayden administration is shaping up as a fireworks display.County budget officers say school officials are stonewalling on vital budget information and are risking deep cuts in the $534 million school budget request if they continue.Dr. Berger says he's provided all the information possible and doesn't know what the fuss is about. Both sides hint that the other is trying to manipulate the situation for some ulterior purpose.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | April 18, 2011
Now that Congress has gotten past the fight over a threatened government shutdown, it's moving on to the next trench warfare on deficit reduction, with more clouds of calamitous stalemate hanging over it. Just as in that first fight, House Speaker John Boehner is embarking on political blackmail to achieve deeper spending cuts, saying categorically that the House majority will not raise the federal debt limit on which U.S. global credibility rests...
HEALTH
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | April 14, 2011
When Erica Earl gets congested and wheezy, her choices for medical care are straightforward: She can go to a community health clinic in East Baltimore that receives federal funding, or she can head to the emergency room. Earl, a 43-year-old nursing student, prefers the clinic — and that's the choice doctors, politicians of both parties and hospital executives want patients to make. But at the same time, the nation's 8,000 community clinics that serve millions of low-income patients are bracing for a $600 million cut in federal aid under the budget compromise approved by Congress on Thursday.
NEWS
By Ron Smith | April 14, 2011
The Congressional Budget Office says the spending bill negotiated with such fanfare by President Barack Obama and House Speaker John Boehner will cut this year's federal fiscal deficit by only $353 million, which is a far cry from what we were told would be $38 billion in reductions. As someone once said to me, "I'm no intellectual, but I can count. " Since even the latter figure is nearly nothing at all considering that last month alone we added $200 billion to the deficit, what we are witnessing coming out of this budget battle in Washington is nothing more than farcical.
NEWS
By Dan Rodricks | April 10, 2011
Republicans in Congress, including Maryland Rep. Andy Harris, would require a woman's accountant — or perhaps an agent of the Internal Revenue Service — to be informed of the circumstances necessitating an abortion. Even when paying for the abortion with her own money, a woman would have to prove to her CPA or the IRS that she was the victim of rape or incest. Otherwise, she would have to forget about deducting the cost of the abortion as a medical expense. "Women who paid for an abortion using money saved in health savings accounts and flexible spending accounts would have to report the amount as taxable income, except in cases of rape or incest, or if the woman's life would be in danger," a website for accountants reported last week, after a vote by the House Ways and Means Committee.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker, The Baltimore Sun | June 9, 2010
A proposed energy tax on industrial buildings in the city has rankled area manufacturers and sparked the latest budget battle in City Hall. Supporters of the levy, which could be voted on today, defend the plan and say it spreads the burden of solving the city's budget woes to more than one industry. Some backers say it could eliminate the need for a controversial bottle tax. The issue illustrates the dilemma of closing a $121 million shortfall in the $2.2 billion budget during one of the worst economic times in the city's history, when no group wants to see its taxes increased.
NEWS
January 10, 2010
Maryland lawmakers prefer the final year of a four-year term to be quiet and noncontroversial as they face an election year. The General Assembly session set to begin Wednesday is likely to prove nothing of the sort for a variety of reasons. First and foremost, legislators are expected to struggle to pass a budget. Despite a promise of no growth in general fund spending, the state is facing more than a $1 billion shortfall in the next fiscal year and, after two years of falling tax revenue, will be forced to cut programs that have been cut before.
NEWS
November 3, 1993
Congress will get a second chance to hack away at chronic federal deficits before it adjourns this month, but the fervor it brings to the task may be a lot less that last August's rhetoric suggested. President Clinton's welcome proposals for a complete overhaul of government procurement practices could save significant sums over the next five years, but it could also have the adverse effect of giving Congress a chance to opt out of any serious budget cutting before it goes home for the year.
NEWS
By Robert Guy Matthews and Robert Guy Matthews,SUN STAFF Sun staff writer Joanna Daemmrich contributed to this article | June 13, 1997
In a chaotic end to a bitter budget dispute, the Baltimore City Council reversed a property tax cut last night in a failed effort to force the mayor to use the added money to restore deep cuts in municipal services.Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke declared the council's actions irrelevant, saying that all the members did was waste a chance for a tax break because he will not spend the money -- about $4.5 million -- to restore cuts.The action appears to end one of the most contentious fights over a city budget in recent memory, one in which two councilmen nearly came to blows after trading barbs on the council floor.
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