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NEWS
February 18, 1991
Today1 p.m. Senate Budget and Taxation subcommittee on transportation matters considers budget of the secretary's office, Department of Transportation. Room 400, Senate Office Building.1 p.m. Senate Budget and Taxation subcommittee on human resources considers budget for office of Child SupportEnforcement. Room 100, Senate Office Building.8 p.m. House and Senate convene, State House.There are 49 days remaining in the 1991 General Assembly session.@
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NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger, The Baltimore Sun | October 17, 2012
Dozens of Baltimore teens and young adults packed a state Senate hearing Wednesday, urging lawmakers not to build a new Baltimore jail for juvenile offenders charged as adults and instead shift efforts to keeping youths from being locked up in the first place. The comments came as the Senate Budget and Taxation Committee met to take testimony on the $70 million, 120-bed proposal being pushed by the state as a way to improve conditions for youthful prisoners in the city. Opponents, such as 21-year-old activist Nicole Cheatom, told senators that the state should repurpose a women's prerelease unit closed three years ago instead of building a new facility.
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NEWS
March 4, 1991
The legislature did not meet yesterday, the 55th day of the 1991 session.TodayNoon: Senate Budget and Taxation subcommittee considers budgets of Mass Transit Administration, Motor Vehicle Administration, State Railroad Administration, Room 400, Senate Office Building.3 p.m.: House Appropriations Committee receives briefing on biotechnology investment and technology transfer issues in Maryland, Room 130, House Office Building.3:30 p.m.: Senate Budget and Taxation Committee considers Schaefer administration proposal to raise the tax on gasoline and various transportation fees, Room 100, Senate Office Building.
NEWS
By Laura Smitherman and Laura Smitherman,Sun reporter | June 6, 2008
Maryland Sen. Ulysses Currie, who is being investigated by the FBI in connection with his consulting work for Shoppers Food & Pharmacy, apparently pressured state highway officials to expedite a traffic light project near a shopping center where the grocery chain planned to open a store. Currie has been an outside consultant to Lanham-based Shoppers, according to the company, though he did not disclose any consulting work in financial statements that he is required to file with the state.
FEATURES
By Eric Siegel | March 11, 1991
A Senate Budget and Taxation subcommittee last week cut $200,000 from the fiscal 1992 budget of the Maryland State Arts Council -- the same amount cut by the House.The Senate added language requiring the arts council to spread the cut evenly among all grant recipients, according to Sen. Lawrence Levitan, D-Montgomery, chairman of the committee.The cut is just a fraction of the $1.15 million reduction recommended last month by legislative budget analysts. Arts leaders had predicted that a reduction of that magnitude would have a devasting effect on their organizations.
NEWS
By Greg Garland and Greg Garland,SUN STAFF | December 28, 1999
Maryland Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller announced a reshuffling of leadership and committee assignments yesterday that he said is "designed to strengthen the Senate's leadership team."Miller named Senator Ida G. Ruben, a Montgomery County Democrat, president pro tem, the second-highest position in the state Senate. The president pro tem presides over the legislative body when the Senate's president is absent, or at his request.Ruben's promotion would make her the first woman to serve as president pro tem in a generation, Miller said, and the first senator from Montgomery County to assume that role in more than a century.
NEWS
March 19, 1992
Today, the Senate Budget and Taxation Committee begins mulling over the proposal to allocate $1.25 million in design funds for a badly needed jail in Anne Arundel County. The prognosis is not good, however.The Anne Arundel County Council voted 5-2 against the site Monday night. The county's Senate delegation is evenly split on the issue. This is partly because County Executive Robert R. Neall didn't brief residents and local politicos on his jail plans.We hope that this legislative hearing shifts the focus of debate back to where it should be -- on the need for a new lockup.
SPORTS
By Sandra McKee | March 13, 1991
The Senate Budget and Taxation Committee is to hear its subcommittee's recommendation today to cut $300,000 from the budget of the state's Office of Sports Promotion.The subcommittee voted to forward those cuts to its parent committee Friday.The Office of Sports Promotion, a program of Maryland's Department of Economic and Employment Development, has been in jeopardy since last month, when a legislative budget analyst recommended the basic termination of the office. However, a House subcommittee voted to cut only $125,000 of the $250,000 OSP budget earmarked for the Maryland State Games, and left the OSP's remaining request for $664,000 intact.
NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | March 6, 2002
Van Hollen resigns budget position over proposed cuts Sen. Christopher Van Hollen Jr. resigned his position as chairman of a Senate budget subcommittee yesterday to protest budget cuts being considered by the General Assembly. The Montgomery County Democrat, who is running for Congress, said he was uncomfortable with the size of the cuts that he would be asked to defend before the full Senate as a subcommittee chairman. He retains his position as vice chairman of the Budget and Taxation Committee.
NEWS
By Michael Hill and Michael Hill,Staff Writer | April 7, 1993
With surprisingly little opposition, the $150 million plan to expand the Baltimore Convention Center yesterday won the approval of the Senate Budget and Taxation Committee.Last week the vote count in the committee was considered too close to call. But the final tally, 11-2, had only two senators from Montgomery County voting against the project, which would more than double the size of the 14-year-old building.In passing the bill, the Senate panel amended the measure already approved by the House.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,Sun reporter | November 6, 2007
Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller said yesterday that he won't block a proposed referendum on legalizing slot machines, putting the measure closer to approval in the General Assembly than it has been in years. Miller, though the legislature's biggest slots proponent, has opposed a referendum on the issue, preferring a straight up-or-down vote in the General Assembly. House Speaker Michael E. Busch, a slots opponent, has long advocated letting the voters decide, a position endorsed by Gov. Martin O'Malley last month.
NEWS
By Melissa Harris and Melissa Harris,SUN REPORTER | March 14, 2007
When Philadelphia-based Resources America Inc. sold the 30-story Alex. Brown Building in downtown Baltimore to a Miami firm last year, they structured the deal in a way that saved them an estimated $2.4 million in city and state transfer and recordation taxes. In 2002, the Rouse Co. used the same legal method to sell 11 shopping centers in Columbia to a New York company, depriving Howard County and Maryland of an estimated $2 million in tax revenues. Most big-ticket developers don't exchange real estate in the same way that homeowners do. Instead of buying property, they acquire ownership of a limited-liability company whose only major asset is property.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,Sun reporter | March 7, 2007
Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller insisted yesterday that Maryland will legalize slot machines within the next year, but he said he will not push a gambling bill through his chamber without Gov. Martin O'Malley's blessing. Miller has been at the forefront of an effort to have Maryland address its long-term budget shortfalls immediately, and he made his case yesterday at a hearing on his slots proposal before the Senate Budget and Taxation Committee. But he acknowledged that he can't win passage without the support of O'Malley and House Speaker Michael E. Busch, two fellow Democrats.
NEWS
By Jonathan D. Rockoff and Jonathan D. Rockoff,SUN STAFF | June 14, 2005
Oversight of privately run group homes for Maryland's troubled children, a responsibility now divided among several state agencies, should be consolidated, a growing number of lawmakers say. "We have to move everything into a single agency," said Sen. Ulysses Currie, a Prince George's County Democrat and chairman of the Senate Budget and Taxation Committee, which is to hold the first of three hearings on the topic today. Three departments - Human Resources, Health & Mental Hygiene, and Juvenile Services - license and monitor their own sets of group homes.
NEWS
By FROM STAFF REPORTS | March 30, 2005
Both houses adopt drug discount for uninsured residents About 40,000 uninsured Marylanders would receive lower cost prescription drugs under legislation unanimously adopted by the House and Senate. The Senate gave approval this week to the plan that would allow individuals earning up to $19,140 a year or a family of four making $38,700 to buy drugs at the Medicaid price, which is lower than retail. The bills (SB 728 and HB 1143) require the state health department to seek a waiver from the federal government that would allow the program.
NEWS
By Andrew A. Green and Andrew A. Green,SUN STAFF | February 12, 2005
A state Senate committee yesterday endorsed a slot machine gambling proposal for the third year in a row, this time adding a few twists designed to pacify opponents in the House of Delegates - and, some lawmakers say, satisfy the competing, deep-pocketed interests that hope to profit from slots. The proposal, which passed the Senate Budget and Taxation Committee by an 11-2 vote, mostly mirrors Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr.'s plan for 15,500 slot machines around the state with the proceeds going to shore up the racing industry, build new schools and pay for the state's stepped-up education funding program.
NEWS
By Elise Armacost and Elise Armacost,Staff writer | March 20, 1992
Sen. John A. Cade suggested yesterday that the state place design money for a controversial new jail in escrow until county political leaders agree on a location.But the County Council may never agree on a site for the detention center, at least not in the near future, said Councilman Edward Middlebrooks, who spoke before the Senate Budget and Taxation Committee during a hearing on a bond bill that includes $1.25 million to design the jail."Senator, I can assure you there's no consensus whether even to proceed with this detention center," said Middlebrooks, a Severn Democrat.
NEWS
By Annapolis Bureau of The Sun | November 21, 1990
ANNAPOLIS -- The General Assembly's Democratic majority, though slightly diminished by this month's election, yesterday unanimously returned to office for another year House Speaker R. Clayton Mitchell Jr., D-Kent, and Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller Jr., D-Prince George's.In separate, uncontentious caucuses, House and Senate Democrats also picked other leaders to begin the four-year legislative term that starts in January.Delegate Nancy K. Kopp of Montgomery County was selected by the House caucus as speaker pro tem, nominally the House's second highest position.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and David Nitkin and Howard Libit and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | April 7, 2004
Pro-gambling lawmakers scrambled yesterday to assemble a significant tax package that could win approval from Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. and free the administration's slots bill for a long-sought vote in the House of Delegates. House Democrats insisted that no vote would come on legalizing slot-machine gambling until Ehrlich agrees to at least $500 million in new revenues. "The House position is: No taxes, no slots," said Del. Sheila E. Hixson, a Montgomery County Democrat and chairwoman of the House Ways and Means Committee.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith Hopkins and Jamie Smith Hopkins,SUN STAFF | September 20, 2002
Maryland's newly projected $1.7 billion shortfall has local officials bracing for a financial double whammy - potential cuts in state aid just as many will be forced to slash their own income tax estimates. The specter of belt-tightening is particularly troublesome for the city of Baltimore and the poorest counties, which rely most heavily on state money. But the announcement Wednesday that the shortfall is increasing has all local officials nervous. "Everybody's in a difficult situation," said Michael Sanderson, legislative director for the Maryland Association of Counties.
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