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NEWS
By John W. Frece and John W. Frece,Annapolis Bureau | February 20, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- The Schaefer administration and the Maryland Association of Counties formally threw their support yesterday behind the House speaker's budget-balancing plan.The move could begin to break the General Assembly's deadlock on budget and tax issues.The plan put together by House Speaker R. Clayton Mitchell Jr., D-Kent, attempts to address a current budget year deficit estimated as high as $270 million. Its two most controversial provisions call for another $88.5 million reduction in state aid to Baltimore and the 23 counties, plus a temporary shift of $80 million from the state's Transportation Trust Fund to the general treasury.
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NEWS
December 4, 2012
Watch out, folks, this could get bumpy. With the release Monday of a proposal, or something approximating one, from House Republican leaders on a way to avert the "fiscal cliff," we now have the opening positions from both parties, neither of which has any chance of becoming law. That is to be expected; no deal is going to be accomplished without a lot of political posturing from both sides and without some serious deadline pressure. But despite what in some respects is a step forward, there is real reason now to think that we will, at least briefly, go over the cliff.
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NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,larry.carson@baltsun.com | October 2, 2008
With state budget cuts and declining revenues looming, Howard County Executive Ken Ulman has switched lobbyists. Ulman recently announced the hiring of Edward M. "Ned" Cheston, a staff lawyer for the General Assembly's Senate Budget and Tax Committee, to replace Joan Lewis Kennedy. Cheston, 31, of Annapolis, will start Monday at a salary of $92,394. His responsibility will be to serve as the administration's chief liaison and advocate to the General Assembly and the County Council. "He is somebody who has incredible knowledge of the legislative process and most importantly the budget," Ulman said.
NEWS
March 4, 2009
In tough economic times, lawmakers must make difficult choices about how to allocate resources and rein in spending. But too often, the brunt of the pain falls on the most vulnerable members of society as cuts in social services and the agencies that administer them not only can't keep up with rising needs but find themselves falling further and further behind. In an economy where unemployment is still climbing, businesses are shutting their doors and the foreclosure crisis keeps unfolding, the people hit hardest by Maryland's budget crunch are the state's poorest residents.
NEWS
By Laura Lippman and John W. Frece and Laura Lippman and John W. Frece,Annapolis Bureau | February 29, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- Two Senate budget subcommittees yesterday began the thankless task of hacking millions of dollars from the $12.6 billion spending plan Gov. William Donald Schaefer submitted for the fiscal year that begins July 1.The jobs of bureaucrats at the Department of Education, midlevel brass in the state police, public information officers in a variety of agencies and money for out-of-state travel, car phones and programs large and small were slashed the...
NEWS
By Amy L. Miller and Amy L. Miller,Sun Staff Writer | May 13, 1994
Youth was given more support than age last night as loud applause followed several requests to increase funding for school building projects during the annual hearing on the Carroll County budget and tax rate.In contrast, boos and hisses greeted suggestions from the Carroll County Taxpayers Association, a group of mostly senior citizens that favors cuts in the budget and tax rate."Ladies and gentlemen, please," county Budget Director Steven D. Powell chided as parents responded to Burt Lego's suggestion that the county schools' budget be trimmed first.
NEWS
By John W. Frece and John W. Frece,Annapolis Bureau | April 2, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- Gov. William Donald Schaefer nudged stubborn House and Senate tax conferees into a face-to-face meeting last night, raising the hope that the legislature's budget and tax deadlock might be broken before Monday's scheduled midnight adjournment.The conferees settled nothing during their 90-minute discussion, but seemed on the verge of a compromise that could be completed when they meet again today.The biggest sticking point, it appeared, was whether a new 6 percent income tax bracket for the wealthy, proposed by the House, should be permanent or, as the Senate suggested, should expire after two or three years.
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK | December 15, 2002
THIS WAS going to be a column about Maryland's outrageously high taxes, but, as sometimes happens, the truth messed up a good story. Maryland is certainly not a "low-tax state," as claimed by the Maryland Budget and Tax Policy Institute. But neither is it the "tax hell" described by Republican Gov.-elect Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. in his 2001 fund-raising pitches. With a few exceptions, Maryland taxes seem just about right. That's not a conclusion you're likely to hear repeated much by either side as the General Assembly deals with a projected budget deficit of $1.2 billion for fiscal 2004.
NEWS
January 5, 1997
ON WEDNESDAY, the Maryland General Assembly convenes for its 1997 regular session. Yet much of the discussion won't revolve around issues with immediate impact; the focus will be on proposals to shape Maryland as it enters the 21st century.Most major matters on the governor's agenda are multi-year projects: Income-tax cuts; reining in land-use sprawl; recycling old industrial sites; free college tuition; a pre-paid tuition program; city school aid. These are far-reaching initiatives, some with big-ticket price tags.
NEWS
By JoAnna Daemmrich and JoAnna Daemmrich,SUN STAFF | January 28, 1998
Seeking to share Maryland's greater prosperity with the working poor, several lawmakers and advocacy groups want to allow such families to cash in their earned income tax credits.Under a formula that considers family size, income and other factors, Maryland gives low-wage families a credit that reduces or eliminates their state tax bill. But unlike the federal government, if the credit is greater than taxes owed, the state does not send them a check.A proposal unveiled yesterday would allow them to receive a payment of up to 15 percent of their federal credit.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,larry.carson@baltsun.com | October 2, 2008
With state budget cuts and declining revenues looming, Howard County Executive Ken Ulman has switched lobbyists. Ulman recently announced the hiring of Edward M. "Ned" Cheston, a staff lawyer for the General Assembly's Senate Budget and Tax Committee, to replace Joan Lewis Kennedy. Cheston, 31, of Annapolis, will start Monday at a salary of $92,394. His responsibility will be to serve as the administration's chief liaison and advocate to the General Assembly and the County Council. "He is somebody who has incredible knowledge of the legislative process and most importantly the budget," Ulman said.
NEWS
By LARRY CARSON | October 21, 2007
There's very little enthusiasm among Howard County's legislators for the special session of the General Assembly set to begin Oct. 29, and some legislators are downright unhappy about it. "Some people have to take an [unpaid] leave of absence from their jobs, and a month before Christmas they lose all that money," said Democratic Del. James E. Malone, a Baltimore County firefighter whose District 12A includes part of Howard. Besides, what will members of other committees do while the budget and tax legislators hold hearings and debate Gov. Martin O'Malley's revenue package?
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | April 8, 2005
Maryland property owners wouldn't get a tax break in the coming year, but school construction would get a $50 million boost under a state budget plan agreed to late yesterday by General Assembly negotiators. After hours of private meetings between House and Senate fiscal leaders, the House of Delegates agreed to drop its push for a rollback of the state portion of the property tax, which was increased in 2003 under a budget balancing compromise with Gov. Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. House leaders had wanted to give homeowners a break of $48 for each $100,000 of their home's property value.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,SUN STAFF | September 24, 2004
Maryland is collecting more tax revenue than anticipated, a trend sure to influence Ehrlich administration decisions on whether to cut deeply into health care for children, addicts and the poor. The treasury should take in $242.6 million more in the current budget year than projected when officials were preparing the spending plan six months ago, according to unofficial figures obtained by The Sun. The state Bureau of Revenue Estimates presented the figures yesterday to Budget Secretary James C. "Chip" DiPaula Jr. as a guideline for preparing next year's $24 billion budget.
NEWS
By Laura Vozzella and Laura Vozzella,SUN STAFF | June 21, 2004
All that stands between Baltimore and its next budget are two City Council meetings, two committee work sessions, a Board of Estimates vote and untold arm-twisting as the council and Mayor Martin O'Malley try to cut some jobs and services, save others, and work out the important details of at least $30 million in new taxes. Not bad for a day's work. City officials expect to complete a flurry of meetings today that will finalize a tax package and a $2.1 billion budget, even though some of the most basic particulars - how millions of dollars will be raised and spent - remain up in the air. While Baltimore budgets often pass in down-to-the-wire style, some council members and observers say that seems especially true now, less than two weeks before the new fiscal year starts July 1, because all the last-minute maneuvering will shape the heftiest tax package in memory.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,SUN STAFF | March 27, 2004
The revenue package passed by the House of Delegates this week could hurt Maryland's tax-burden ranking among the states but wouldn't make it the "tax hell" some critics predict, according to a respected research group. The state now ranks roughly in the middle of the pack in terms of state and local tax burden, according to the Washington-based Tax Foundation. William Ahern, spokesman for the group, said the net $670 million increase proposed by House Speaker Michael E. Busch could push it up to about 15th if other states hold their rates stable.
NEWS
August 19, 1996
LET'S GET one thing clear: Gov. Parris N. Glendening, like any good politician, would love to cut taxes. It would blunt a Republican challenge in 1998 and improve the governor's popularity.But wishing and doing are two different things. In his 19 months as governor, Mr. Glendening has adopted a cautious, conservative approach on budget and tax matters. He's not about to embark on a feel-good tax cut plan that could cripple the state's balance sheet,In June, Mr. Glendening repeated his concern that Maryland's slow-growth economy makes a tax cut unlikely.
NEWS
By John W. Frece and John W. Frece,Staff Writer | April 2, 1992
ANNAPOLIS -- House and Senate tax negotiations collapsed today, just when it appeared the General Assembly was about to work out its differences.The sudden reversal again raised the possibility that the state's 1993 budget may not be adopted by Monday's midnight adjournment deadline, which would force the 90-day session to be extended until it is.At the urging of Gov. William Donald Schaefer, tax conferees met last night and seemed on the verge of reaching...
NEWS
February 13, 2003
AS FEDERAL RESERVE chairman for more than 15 years, Alan Greenspan has proved himself a master of the obtuse utterance -- what he once described as the art of incoherent mumbling. In the course of attempting to guide the nation's economy alongside four presidents and through boom and bust, Mr. Greenspan also has been, by turns, an inflation-fighter, deficit hawk and, most recently, tax-cut booster. Given that political agility -- and suspicions that he's sympathetic to the Republican tax-cut agenda -- his clear-cut challenge this week to the economic theory undergirding President Bush's latest budget and tax proposals was striking.
BUSINESS
By JAY HANCOCK | December 15, 2002
THIS WAS going to be a column about Maryland's outrageously high taxes, but, as sometimes happens, the truth messed up a good story. Maryland is certainly not a "low-tax state," as claimed by the Maryland Budget and Tax Policy Institute. But neither is it the "tax hell" described by Republican Gov.-elect Robert L. Ehrlich Jr. in his 2001 fund-raising pitches. With a few exceptions, Maryland taxes seem just about right. That's not a conclusion you're likely to hear repeated much by either side as the General Assembly deals with a projected budget deficit of $1.2 billion for fiscal 2004.
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