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Budget Agreement

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By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | April 6, 2012
House Speaker Michael E. Busch said Friday morning that negotiations between the House and Senate are "in good shape" and that the General Assembly should have no trouble wrapping uo work on a balanced budget before its schedulked adjournment Monday. In a brief interview, Busch said the House-Senate conference committees on the budget package will resume work after Friday morning's floor session and that the two sides are getting within range of a settlement after a Senate proposal Thursday night that split the difference between the chambers on how to raise taxes.
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NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | March 4, 2014
President Barack Obama proposed a $3.9 trillion federal budget on Tuesday that calls for spending billions more on infrastructure, raising taxes on the wealthy and closing the gap between rich and poor that he has vowed to make a focus of his second term. The budget - drafted with this fall's congressional elections on the horizon - includes a host of policies likely to appeal to Democratic voters, such as expanding early childhood education, raising tobacco taxes and boosting a tax credit for the poor.
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NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | December 17, 2013
A bipartisan budget deal aimed at calming debates over U.S. fiscal policy for the next two years cleared a key vote Tuesday in the Senate, reducing the risks of another government shutdown and spending cuts that would have had an outsized impact in Maryland. But the agreement also sets up a tight timeline for congressional lawmakers - and Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski, chairwoman of the Senate Appropriations Committee, in particular - who now must decide by Jan. 15 how to divvy up $1 trillion-plus in spending.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | January 5, 2014
Facing a backlash from veterans, lawmakers in both parties — including several in Maryland — are reconsidering a cut to military retiree pensions that they approved last month as part of a rare bipartisan budget agreement. Several proposals have been introduced to tweak or roll back the $6 billion cut to annual cost-of-living adjustments — or COLAs — for working-age military retirees. The issue is gaining prominence as lawmakers prepare to return to Washington this week. The two-year budget agreement "was necessary to avert another government shutdown but we hope the [retiree]
NEWS
by Annie Linskey | May 9, 2012
Standing side by side, Gov. Martin O'Malley and the state's two top legislative leaders unveiled the broad outlines of the budget plan they hope to enact quickly during a special session next week. The plan will raise income taxes on those making more than $100,000 a year (households making more than $150K), a House-backed proposal similar to the one that budget conferees agreed to in the final hours of session. It also makes deeper cuts than the budget O'Malley initially submitted in January.
NEWS
May 15, 1996
LIKE THE CHESHIRE CAT, a balanced budget agreement between President Clinton and Republicans in Congress is vanishing slowly, beginning with the tail and ending with a grin that is starting to resemble a sneer at the long-suffering American public. Each party will profess fealty to the notion that by year 2002 the government won't spend any more than it takes in. But to believe that, in the Wonderland of Washington, is to believe six impossible things before breakfast.Republicans and Democrats are too busy setting election-year traps for one another to give two hoots about their much-touted fiscal frugality.
NEWS
May 16, 1997
WASHINGTON -- President Clinton and the Republican leaders of Congress barely had time two weeks ago to toast the end of their long political war over the budget before the squabbling resumed.They had announced, with much self-congratulation, their agreement on a plan to balance the federal budget by 2002. But the fizz in the celebratory champagne seemed to outlast the accord. Republican leaders contended that they made no guarantees about certain pet proposals of Clinton's; the White House insisted that there had been firm commitments.
NEWS
May 24, 1991
Just when it looks like the new federal budget-control agreement is working better than expected, Democratic leaders in the House and Senate begin talking of tax cuts that would blow it to smithereens. Fortunately, neither Sen. George Mitchell nor Rep. Richard Gephardt really means it -- they are just playing politics. Even more fortunately, responsible Democratic lawmakers won't let it happen even if Republicans would cynically go along.The Mitchell-Gephardt ploy is little more than a sign of Democratic frustration over GOP success in working the tax issue.
NEWS
March 6, 1992
One of the more amusing entertainments of the political season is to watch House Republicans valiantly fight to preserve key elements of the 1990 budget agreement as President Bush tries to slither away from it. Not that many of these Republicans were pleased when Mr. Bush reneged on his "no new taxes" pledge in order to put some sense in government finances. What they liked then, and what they like now, were provisions to protect the defense establishment from evisceration.Another spectacle worthy of a giant belly laugh is the sudden attachment the Democratic leadership has developed for that same budget agreement after having tried to wreck it scarcely before the ink was dry.One wonders how much hilarity and hypocrisy the citizens can take -- even in an election year.
NEWS
June 4, 1991
If the latest brightening economic indicators are correct, this may prove to be a recession that was over before the Democrats could do much to help their traditional constituency. The unemployment compensation system is a prime example. Established in 1935 by the Roosevelt New Deal, its coverage expanded until the Reagan era, then went into a retrenchment that Democrats have been unable to modify right through the current slump.The House Budget Committee hopes to generate some passion for wider and longer benefits for the jobless with an educational hearing Thursday.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | December 17, 2013
A bipartisan budget deal aimed at calming debates over U.S. fiscal policy for the next two years cleared a key vote Tuesday in the Senate, reducing the risks of another government shutdown and spending cuts that would have had an outsized impact in Maryland. But the agreement also sets up a tight timeline for congressional lawmakers - and Sen. Barbara A. Mikulski, chairwoman of the Senate Appropriations Committee, in particular - who now must decide by Jan. 15 how to divvy up $1 trillion-plus in spending.
NEWS
By Robert B. Reich | October 22, 2013
First came the drama over the government shutdown. Then the showdown over the debt ceiling. Now another round of negotiations on the budget deficit. Pardon me for asking, but when exactly will Washington begin to deal with the crisis of jobs, wages and widening inequality? Job growth is slowing perilously. The Labor Department reported today that only 148,000 jobs were created in September - way down from the average of 207,000 new jobs a month in the first quarter of the year.
NEWS
May 23, 2012
This is the season when local governments finalize their budgets for the next fiscal year, and the grousing about their penurious circumstances is in full swing. Some are even complaining that the state's revised budget and tax plan - signed into law by Gov.Martin O'Malleythis week - has put a serious crimp in their finances. In particular, they blame the state's decision to shift a portion of the cost of teacher retirement contributions to Baltimore City and the counties as ruinous to their own budgets.
NEWS
by Annie Linskey | May 9, 2012
Standing side by side, Gov. Martin O'Malley and the state's two top legislative leaders unveiled the broad outlines of the budget plan they hope to enact quickly during a special session next week. The plan will raise income taxes on those making more than $100,000 a year (households making more than $150K), a House-backed proposal similar to the one that budget conferees agreed to in the final hours of session. It also makes deeper cuts than the budget O'Malley initially submitted in January.
NEWS
by Annie Linskey | April 12, 2012
Gov. Martin O'Malley this morning accepted some of the blame for the budget impasse that has left the state with a budget that cuts key Democratic priorities like education and slices money from liberal strongholds. "We all hold blame," O'Malley, a Democrat, said. "We're all public servants. ... When the public is ill-served, as the public is right now, we all share the responsibility. " "I wish we had had a different result," he said. "It was not for lack of trying. It was not for a lack of commitment.
NEWS
By Annie Linskey, The Baltimore Sun | April 12, 2012
Gov. Martin O'Malley on Thursday accepted some of the blame for the budget impasse that left the state with a spending plan that cuts about half a billion dollars from key Democratic priorities such as education. "We all hold blame," O'Malley, a Democrat, said on WTOP's monthly Ask the Governor show. "We're all public servants. ... When the public is ill-served, as the public is right now, we all share the responsibility. " "I wish we had had a different result," he said. "It was not for lack of trying.
NEWS
March 18, 1992
Congress is going to have another chance to make a travesty of itself this week when it votes on a House Democratic leadership scheme to tear down the walls of fiscal discipline built into the 1990 budget agreement. If the House goes along, the Senate will then get a chance to show it is equally irresponsible. Taxpayers need lose no sleep from this charade, however. If Congress passes this legislation, it will be vetoed by President Bush and his veto will be sustained.Only two weeks ago, Democrats were chiding Mr. Bush for his assertion that he made a "mistake" in approving the budget agreement when, actually, his mistake was his "no new taxes" pledge in the first place.
NEWS
By William J. Eaton and William J. Eaton,Los Angeles Times | August 3, 1991
WASHINGTON -- In a direct challenge to President Bush, the House gave final congressional approval yesterday to a $5.8 billion emergency extension of unemployment compensation for jobless workers who have exhausted their regular benefits.By a vote of 375-45 on the first anti-recession measure of the year, the House adopted the Senate-passed bill and sent it to the president despite White House contentions that the recession is ending.Democratic leaders rushed the legislation through Congress before a monthlong August recess, partly to confront the president with a choice of accepting it or taking the politically risky course of appearing to turnhis back on millions of unemployed.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | April 6, 2012
House Speaker Michael E. Busch said Friday morning that negotiations between the House and Senate are "in good shape" and that the General Assembly should have no trouble wrapping uo work on a balanced budget before its schedulked adjournment Monday. In a brief interview, Busch said the House-Senate conference committees on the budget package will resume work after Friday morning's floor session and that the two sides are getting within range of a settlement after a Senate proposal Thursday night that split the difference between the chambers on how to raise taxes.
NEWS
August 4, 1997
CONGRESS HAS so far made only minor restorations in its severe cuts in food stamps and other nutrition programs imposed as part of last year's welfare reform legislation. As a result, more people will be seeking the services of food banks in Maryland and elsewhere. Already, these groups are seeing increased demand, which they are not able to meet.According to a nationwide study by the Tufts University Center on Hunger, Poverty and Nutrition Policy, the cuts will lead to an unprecedented decrease in the amount of food available to hungry Americans, and private food banks and other charitable agencies won't be able to to fill the gap. The Maryland Food Bank, Maryland's largest anti-hunger advocacy organization, handed out some 12 million pounds of food in 1996.
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