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By Ken Murray and Ken Murray,Evening Sun Staff | January 8, 1991
Buddy Ryan, architect of Philadelphia's free-wheeling, trash-talking, playoff-losing Eagles, was fired today by owner Norman Braman in a decision that surprised no one.In recent weeks, Ryan wanted credit for resurrecting the Eagles to playoff status. Instead, he got the blame for a multitude of sins, including his personal war with Braman, the team's disappointing postseason performances the last three years and its reputation for cheap talk and late hits.Ryan's tempestuous five-year reign was as good as over in the third quarter of last Saturday's 20-6 wild-card loss to the Washington Redskins.
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By Mike Preston and Mike Preston,mike.preston@baltsun.com | August 28, 2009
Former Ravens linebacker Bart Scott has been involved in controversies before, but he was surprised by the one he stirred up after the Ravens' preseason game here against the New York Jets on Monday night. Scott, now starting for the Jets, spent his first seven seasons in the NFL with the Ravens before signing a lucrative contract with New York once free agency began this past offseason. After the game Monday night, Scott appeared to take some shots at head coach John Harbaugh, who took the Ravens to the AFC championship game last year in his rookie season.
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By Don Pierson and Don Pierson,Chicago Tribune | August 11, 1991
LAWRENCEBURG, Ky. -- Tucked among less prosperous spreads in the heart of horse country, Ryan Farm sticks out like another surprising Buddy Ryan quote.Ryan and his wife, Joan, found the 176 acres 17 years ago and transformed a junky, hilly site into the best-looking place in the neighborhood. There are many richer horse farms in the area, but not on this back road, where the Ryans' big brick home sits overlooking black-fenced paddocks that characterize the spectacular Lexington-Frankfurt scenery.
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By Jamison Hensley and Jamison Hensley,Sun reporter | January 11, 2008
Rex Ryan hopes his recent whirlwind interview tour will lead to his ultimate destination - becoming an NFL head coach. He made his case to remain with the Ravens on Sunday. He sat down with Atlanta Falcons owner Arthur Blank on Monday. He talked football with Miami Dolphins executive vice president Bill Parcells on Tuesday. Now Ryan, with three strong seasons as the Ravens' defensive coordinator, has taken a wait-and-see attitude, although he seems more optimistic than nervous. "I feel good about getting an opportunity," Ryan said yesterday from his Ellicott City home.
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By Mike Preston and Mike Preston,SUN STAFF | August 17, 2005
Even hundreds of miles apart, twin brothers Rex and Rob Ryan take good-natured shots at one another. They've always been competitive, regardless of whether the competition involved baseball, wrestling or marbles. Rob is in his second year as defensive coordinator of the Oakland Raiders. Rex is in his first season as defensive coordinator of the Ravens. "I wish him the best of luck, and I told him he'll have the second-best defense in the league," Rex said. When told of those comments, Rob replied: "We've been on different sidelines six times, and I've beaten him more times than he's beaten me. Also, remind him that I have two Super Bowl rings and he has only one. The old man has three, and that's going to be tough to beat."
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By Vito Stellino and Vito Stellino,Special to The Sun | October 25, 1994
They've broken up the old gang in Philadelphia that made the Eagles such an entertaining team a few years ago.Owner Norman Braman has sold the team, coach Buddy Ryan is in the desert in Phoenix, Jerome Brown died in an auto crash, and most of the big-name players -- including Reggie White, Keith Jackson, Seth Joyner and Clyde Simmons -- have scattered to the four winds.When they were all together in Philadelphia in the late 1980s, there was no team that created such a storm off the field but was so disappointing on it.Even though they never managed to win a playoff game, they were always a high-profile team noted for making headlines, whether it was Mr. Ryan treating the owner with disdain before he got fired or the defensive players treating the offensive players as if they were second-class citizens.
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By Knight-Ridder | October 3, 1990
PHILADELPHIA -- Buddy Ryan need not worry about his job -- until the season is over.That was the message Norman Braman sent out yesterday, speaking from Florida on his car phone. Braman, the Philadelphia Eagles owner, also said his players should concern themselves with their own performances right now, rather than worrying about the fate of their coach."We will not change coaches in midstream," Braman said in a radio interview. "That's something we are not going to do. I can say that categorically."
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By Knight-Ridder News Service | December 27, 1994
CHARLOTTE, N.C. -- Arizona Cardinals coach Buddy Ryan, intent on restructuring his team's offense before next season, plans to make three prominent veterans available to the Carolina Panthers and Jacksonville Jaguars in the NFL expansion draft in February.Two days after the Cardinals ended their season with a 10-6 loss to the Atlanta Falcons, Ryan informed quarterback Steve Beuerlein and wide receivers Gary Clark and Ricky Proehl in private meetings yesterday that he plans to include them among the six players the team exposes in the veteran allocation draft.
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By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,Sun Staff Correspondent | January 9, 1991
PHILADELPHIA -- It was Buddy Ryan's last waltz.The man who failed to deliver on a five-year promise to bring the Philadelphia Eagles to pro football's "Big Dance" -- the Super Bowl -- was fired yesterday as the team's head coach and replaced by assistant Rich Kotite.The change was engineered by team owner Norman Braman three days after the Eagles were defeated by the Washington Redskins, 20-6, and eliminated in the first round of the National Football League playoffs for the third straight season.
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By Bill Lyon and Bill Lyon,Philadelphia Inquirer | September 17, 1990
PHILADELPHIA -- The Eagles lost to a team they should have beaten. This is a recording.Dial 1-900-TEED-OFF. If mad, press 1. If really mad, press 2.It has been their hallmark throughout Buddy Ryan's tempestuous tenure, this infuriating ability to make a road kill of an opponent suddenly look like filet mignon.To play down to the level of their competition.To turn the should-be victory into the how-the-hell-did-this-happen loss.They invented yet another ingenious way to self-destruct yesterday, and in the process made the Phoenix Cardinals, a certifiably bad team, look several grades better than they probably are.But then that has been the Eagles' troubled history with the Cardinals, no matter whether they are getting their mail in Chicago or St. Louis or Phoenix.
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By RICK MAESE | May 13, 2007
This isn't the typical Mother's Day story, but that's OK because theirs was never a typical mother-son relationship. When you're talking about a coach's family, nothing is really normal. So today, Rex Ryan will remain in Maryland with his wife and two children. He sent flowers to his stepmother and says Joanie won't be far from his thoughts. She never is. And similar to most Sundays, Joanie, 76, is supposed to be picked up by her husband of 37 years. Buddy Ryan will take her to a Louisville, Ky., church, and as they chat, she'll surely ask how Rex is doing and how his twin brother, Rob, is doing, too. Buddy will tell her they're both good, but inevitably, just a few minutes later, she'll forget and will ask again.
SPORTS
By Jamison Hensley and Jamison Hensley,Sun reporter | September 15, 2006
A week after the Manning brothers dueled on national television, football's next sibling rivalry shifts to the first family of defense. Rex and Rob Ryan - the twin sons of renowned coach Buddy Ryan - meet for the first time on an NFL field Sunday, when they oppose one another as defensive coordinators for the Ravens and the Oakland Raiders. For the Ryan family, it'll be different to see the brothers competing on opposite sidelines because they were inseparable as children. Rex and Rob always teamed up, whether it was football, baseball or a backyard brawl.
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By Mike Preston and Mike Preston,SUN STAFF | August 17, 2005
Even hundreds of miles apart, twin brothers Rex and Rob Ryan take good-natured shots at one another. They've always been competitive, regardless of whether the competition involved baseball, wrestling or marbles. Rob is in his second year as defensive coordinator of the Oakland Raiders. Rex is in his first season as defensive coordinator of the Ravens. "I wish him the best of luck, and I told him he'll have the second-best defense in the league," Rex said. When told of those comments, Rob replied: "We've been on different sidelines six times, and I've beaten him more times than he's beaten me. Also, remind him that I have two Super Bowl rings and he has only one. The old man has three, and that's going to be tough to beat."
SPORTS
By Bob McClellan and Bob McClellan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 11, 2000
NASHVILLE, Tenn. - Much like a certain presidential candidate from the state of Tennessee, the Titans aren't ready to yield - in this case, the title of the AFC's best defense to the Ravens. Fortunately for the Titans, they don't have to call for a recount just yet. The NFL season has a long way to go. And more important to the Titans than achieving a higher ranking on defense than the Ravens is to be the last AFC defense playing, just as was the case last year. "We're getting close to where we were last year," defensive coordinator Gregg Williams said as the AFC Central-leading Titans (8-1)
SPORTS
By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,SUN STAFF | December 18, 1995
PHILADELPHIA -- Before the start of the season, new Philadelphia Eagles coach Ray Rhodes told his wife, Carmen, that he expected his team to finish 12-4."
SPORTS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | December 27, 1994
CHARLOTTE, N.C. -- Arizona Cardinals coach Buddy Ryan, intent on restructuring his team's offense before next season, plans to make three prominent veterans available to the Carolina Panthers and Jacksonville Jaguars in the NFL expansion draft in February.Two days after the Cardinals ended their season with a 10-6 loss to the Atlanta Falcons, Ryan informed quarterback Steve Beuerlein and wide receivers Gary Clark and Ricky Proehl in private meetings yesterday that he plans to include them among the six players the team exposes in the veteran allocation draft.
SPORTS
January 19, 1991
Quarterback Joe Montana missed the San Francisco 49ers' practice with the flu yesterday, but is expected to play in tomorrow's National Football Conference championship game against the New York Giants.Montana, who has had one of his healthiest seasons in years, had practiced with the team all week, but began feeling ill Thursday night and did not report to camp yesterday."We expect him to be fine," coach George Seifert said. "It was just a matter of having him not come to work when he doesn't feel good."
SPORTS
By Steve Schoenfeld and Steve Schoenfeld,Arizona Republic | February 4, 1994
PHOENIX, Ariz. -- Nice Guys are out. Buddy Ball is in.Buddy Ryan ball.Ryan, the Houston Oilers defensive coordinator, was hired as coach and general manager of the Phoenix Cardinals yesterday, a move that sent shock waves through the NFL."Does Bill Bidwill know what he did?" one NFL executive said.What the Cardinals owner did was replace Joe Bugel, Mr. Nice Guy, with one of the league's most controversial coaches, James David "Buddy" Ryan, who signed a four-year contract for close to $500,000 a year.
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By MARTIN D. TULLAI | November 27, 1994
Kevin Gilbride and Buddy Ryan always will be remembered for their sideline fight when the two were assistant coaches with the Houston Oilers last season.Earlier this month, when Gilbride and his boss Jack Pardee were fired by Houston, Ryan, now the Arizona Cardinals' coach, rubbed salt in Gilbride's wound by saying: "I predicted that he'd be selling insurance in two years. It was a year early."Ryan seems to relish his reputation as a loudmouth. A few years ago, while coaching the Philadelphia Eagles, he caused a stir by telling the Redskins to bring body bags for their showdown with his team.
FEATURES
By Vito Stellino and Vito Stellino,Special to The Sun | October 25, 1994
They've broken up the old gang in Philadelphia that made the Eagles such an entertaining team a few years ago.Owner Norman Braman has sold the team, coach Buddy Ryan is in the desert in Phoenix, Jerome Brown died in an auto crash, and most of the big-name players -- including Reggie White, Keith Jackson, Seth Joyner and Clyde Simmons -- have scattered to the four winds.When they were all together in Philadelphia in the late 1980s, there was no team that created such a storm off the field but was so disappointing on it.Even though they never managed to win a playoff game, they were always a high-profile team noted for making headlines, whether it was Mr. Ryan treating the owner with disdain before he got fired or the defensive players treating the offensive players as if they were second-class citizens.
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