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Buddy Holly

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By Mary Johnson, Special to The Baltimore Sun | August 12, 2010
A vibrant, rocking Buddy Holly returns to the stage in Annapolis Summer Garden's season-closing performance of "Buddy: The Buddy Holly Story. " Alan Janes' and Rob Bettinson's "Buddy" tells the story of a young Texan who changed popular music forever. Buddy Holly's mix of 1950s country, rockabilly and rhythm & blues has influenced such pop legends as the Beatles, the Rolling Stones, Eric Clapton, Bob Dylan and Bruce Springsteen. One of the first to write, produce and perform his own songs, Holly established his influence during a brief year career that ended at age 22 in a plane crash, a tragedy commemorated in Don McLean's "American Pie" anthem.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Jordan Bartel and The Baltimore Sun | June 23, 2014
There was something in the musical water of 1994. Let's take another sip. A good chunk of millennials were either pre-teens or young teens in 1994 - and their budding musical tastes were informed by a wide array of memorable offerings in just about every genre. It was the post-grunge era, and alternative music ruled. But so did R&B, rap (which was getting away from party-anthems and addressing more realistic or slice-of-life tales) and pop-ish singer-songwriters. It was a year that saw the release of many seminal albums: Green Day's "Dookie," Nine Inch Nails' "The Downward Spiral," Nas' "Illmatic," Weezer's "Blue Album," Hootie and the Blowfish's "Cracked Rear View," the Notorious B.I.G's "Ready to Die. " Aaliyah, Korn, Dave Matthews Band, Brandy, Oasis, Portishead and Marilyn Manson were among the artists who released their first album in 1994.
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FEATURES
By Ann Kolson and Ann Kolson,Knight-Ridder | November 27, 1990
NEW YORK -- Few stars have shone so briefly and so brightly as Buddy Holly.The career of the legendary rocker began in Lubbock, Texas, and ended 18 months later, on Feb. 3, 1959, in a fiery plane crash in a snow-covered Iowa cornfield when Holly was 22 years old. Since then his life and, even more, his music have become myth.Now Philadelphia-born Paul Hipp is resurrecting this "dead rock star from Texas who wears glasses," as he plainly puts it, in "Buddy: The Buddy Holly Story," which opened on Broadway after a successful London run. The colorful show -- it's a cross between straight biography and rousing oldies concert -- gets the audience wildly clapping and dancing in their seats to such simple, compelling tunes of Holly's as "Peggy Sue," "That'll Be the Day" and "Rave On."
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, Special to The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2010
A vibrant, rocking Buddy Holly returns to the stage in Annapolis Summer Garden's season-closing performance of "Buddy: The Buddy Holly Story. " Alan Janes' and Rob Bettinson's "Buddy" tells the story of a young Texan who changed popular music forever. Buddy Holly's mix of 1950s country, rockabilly and rhythm & blues has influenced such pop legends as the Beatles, the Rolling Stones, Eric Clapton, Bob Dylan and Bruce Springsteen. One of the first to write, produce and perform his own songs, Holly established his influence during a brief year career that ended at age 22 in a plane crash, a tragedy commemorated in Don McLean's "American Pie" anthem.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck | December 8, 1991
Joe Warren Davis recently visited the Surf Ballroom in Clear Lake, Iowa, where Buddy Holly played his final concert on Feb. 2, 1959, immediately before he died in a plane crash along with Ritchie Valens and the Big Bopper.The Surf Ballroom is probably a tourist attraction for rock-and-roll aficionados, but Mr. Davis was not a mere tourist: He plays the title role in the national company of "Buddy: The Buddy Holly Story," which opens at the Mechanic Theatre on Wednesday.Visiting the ballroom -- as well as the nearby crash site -- "was not the experience I was expecting," the 30-year-old actor said in a phone interview during the musical's engagement in Lansing, Mich.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck | December 12, 1991
They look antediluvian by today's rock music standards: group of nerdy guys with short hair -- probably Brylcreemed -- wearing identical gray-striped sports coats and horn-rimmed sunglasses. They might be preppies in uniform, or heaven forbid, junior bankers.But, no. They are Buddy Holly and the Crickets, reincarnated in "Buddy: The Buddy Holly Story," which opened at the Mechanic Theatre last night. But this show isn't merely a blast from the past, or a museum-like tribute to the roots of rock and roll, it's a foot-tapping, stand-up-and-clap-your-hands good time.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | May 11, 2000
"Tell your friends to come on down because Buddy Holly is back in town," lead actor Van Zeiler says after playing an encore in "Buddy: The Buddy Holly Story." It's been almost nine years since this British-born musical about the seminal American rock and roller played Baltimore. In the interim, the U.S. Postal Service issued a commemorative Buddy Holly stamp, and more than a half dozen Web sites have sprung up. Holly's star hasn't waned and, as the polished production at the Lyric Opera House proves, neither has the musical based on his life.
NEWS
By WILLIAM HYDER and WILLIAM HYDER,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 7, 2006
The tragically short life of a rock-`n'-roll pioneer is dramatized in Buddy -- The Buddy Holly Story, running at Toby's Dinner Theatre through Sept. 3. Remembered for his gold disc, "Peggy Sue," and his black-rimmed glasses, Holly died in a 1959 plane crash with two other rock singers, Ritchie Valens and J. P. Richardson, known as the "Big Bopper." In a national career that lasted only a few years, he wrote an impressive number of hit songs, some of which have become standards. At Toby's, his music is presented in authentic style by a cast of multitalented performers directed by Toby Orenstein and Shawn Kettering.
NEWS
By Jamie Smith and Jamie Smith,SUN STAFF | June 16, 1998
At a student history competition filled with traditional topics -- the Underground Railroad, the Irish potato famine -- research on rock 'n' roll may come as a surprise. And that's exactly the reaction its authors want.Hoping to bring a new perspective to the subject of migration, a group of Baltimore County middle school students drew yesterday on everyone from Buddy Holly to the Beatles in their National History Day entry at the University of Maryland, College Park.The weeklong event challenges participants to think and work as historians.
FEATURES
By Alex Beam and Alex Beam,Boston Globe | January 3, 1992
THE ENTERTAINMENT sensation of the moment is Garrison Keillor's decision to move his American Radio Company broadcast from New York City to a new home, possibly in New England.Politicos, impresarios and newspaper columnists have been been begging Keillor to set up the mikes in their hometowns. I would like to add my voice to the swelling chorus.Garrison, please move to Burlington or Bennington, Vt., Hartford or any of the innumerable burgs trying to catch your batwing-browed eye. But don't come to Boston.
TRAVEL
By Margaret Backenheimer and Margaret Backenheimer,Special to The Baltimore Sun | January 4, 2009
JANUARY 20: Washington Inauguration Day. Hoopla for Barack Obama, with swearing-in at noon. 22 : St. Paul, Minn. St. Paul Winter Carnival. Everything's on ice, from fishing to softball. Through Feb. 1. 24-31 : Elko, Nev. National Cowboy Poetry Gathering. 25th annual roundup of silver-tongued ranch hands. 25 : Ayrshire, Scotland Homecoming Burns Supper. Poet Robert Burns' 250th birthday party launches return-to-Scotland year. 25 : Hong Kong Chinese New Year Celebrations. Parades and fireworks unyoke the Year of the Ox. Through Feb. 1. FEBRUARY 3 : Lubbock, Texas Not Fade Away: Remembering "The Day the Music Died."
NEWS
By WILLIAM HYDER and WILLIAM HYDER,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 7, 2006
The tragically short life of a rock-`n'-roll pioneer is dramatized in Buddy -- The Buddy Holly Story, running at Toby's Dinner Theatre through Sept. 3. Remembered for his gold disc, "Peggy Sue," and his black-rimmed glasses, Holly died in a 1959 plane crash with two other rock singers, Ritchie Valens and J. P. Richardson, known as the "Big Bopper." In a national career that lasted only a few years, he wrote an impressive number of hit songs, some of which have become standards. At Toby's, his music is presented in authentic style by a cast of multitalented performers directed by Toby Orenstein and Shawn Kettering.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Robert Hilburn and Robert Hilburn,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 18, 2004
For years, rock fans old enough to have been at Woodstock in 1969 have rolled their eyes at reader polls by youth-oriented pop publications that name the best artists or albums of the last half century. That's because their readers tend to vote for their favorites of the moment rather than bring a sense of historical perspective to the process. In Britain's Q magazine in 1998, readers asked to choose the "100 greatest albums in the universe" named Radiohead's 1997 O.K. Computer No. 1 (the runner-up was the Beatles' Revolver)
FEATURES
By Michael Corcoran and Michael Corcoran,COX NEWS SERVICE | February 15, 2002
AUSTIN, Texas - He wore a black hat, flashed a don't-mess-with-me grin and rebelled against Nashville's glossy commercialism with such defiant songs as "Are You Sure Hank Done It This Way?" Waylon Jennings, the raging soul of outlaw country music, recorded 60 albums and had 16 No. 1 country singles in a career that spanned five decades and began when he played bass for Buddy Holly. Known for such modern classics as "Good Hearted Woman," "I've Always Been Crazy" and a series of hit duets in the 1970s with Willie Nelson, Jennings died Wednesday after a long battle with diabetes-related health problems.
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | November 12, 2001
CYRUS V. SWETT, 63, of Ellicott City says collecting orchids is liking eating potato chips - it's hard to stop with just one. "It grows on you," he said, making a very bad pun about his horticultural hobby. "There's always another one you'd like to have." Swett, who is president of the Maryland Orchid Society, estimates he has from 500 to 600 orchids, and he's constantly acquiring more. To hold all the blooms, he recently built a new greenhouse that's 12 feet by 25 feet, twice the size of his old one. Swett has been involved in the organization since 1986 and has been president for the past two years.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | May 11, 2000
"Tell your friends to come on down because Buddy Holly is back in town," lead actor Van Zeiler says after playing an encore in "Buddy: The Buddy Holly Story." It's been almost nine years since this British-born musical about the seminal American rock and roller played Baltimore. In the interim, the U.S. Postal Service issued a commemorative Buddy Holly stamp, and more than a half dozen Web sites have sprung up. Holly's star hasn't waned and, as the polished production at the Lyric Opera House proves, neither has the musical based on his life.
FEATURES
By Michael Corcoran and Michael Corcoran,COX NEWS SERVICE | February 15, 2002
AUSTIN, Texas - He wore a black hat, flashed a don't-mess-with-me grin and rebelled against Nashville's glossy commercialism with such defiant songs as "Are You Sure Hank Done It This Way?" Waylon Jennings, the raging soul of outlaw country music, recorded 60 albums and had 16 No. 1 country singles in a career that spanned five decades and began when he played bass for Buddy Holly. Known for such modern classics as "Good Hearted Woman," "I've Always Been Crazy" and a series of hit duets in the 1970s with Willie Nelson, Jennings died Wednesday after a long battle with diabetes-related health problems.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karin Remesch | May 4, 2000
Women's Show in Timonium Women can view the latest in upscale but affordable fashion, hone their car-buying skills, receive health and fitness tips, attend cooking classes, enjoy a bridal show, learn about business and career opportunities and shop at the 6th annual Baltimore Women's Show this weekend at the Maryland State Fairgrounds in Timonium. More than 500 exhibitors are offering their wares. After the show closes Saturday, stick around for a concert by Grammy Award-winning country singer Kathy Mattea (pictured)
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