Advertisement
HomeCollectionsBuddy Deane Show
IN THE NEWS

Buddy Deane Show

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, Special to The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2011
Annapolis Summer Garden caps a strong season with "Hairspray," John Waters' nostalgic tribute to 1960s Baltimore that is a perfect fit for outdoor August evenings at City Dock. Based on Waters' 1988 film, the musical has won eight Tony awards, including Best Musical and Best Original Score. At a 2003 Broadway visit to a session of the American Theatre Critics Association mini-conference, Waters stressed the importance of the authenticity of every aspect of the Baltimore rowhouse set seen in the Broadway production.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | April 3, 2014
Abraham "Al" Baitch, a musician recalled as one of Baltimore's finest saxophone players, died March 24 at Northwest Hospital after suffering a fall. The Pikesville resident was 89. During his 70 years in the local entertainment scene, Mr. Baitch was a fixture at nightclubs, where his onstage antics earned him the nickname "Madman. " He headed the house band for WJZ-TV's "The Buddy Deane Show" in the 1950s and 1960s. "We played everywhere, from The Block to the French Embassy in Washington," said John Baxter, a piano player who worked alongside Mr. Baitch for 42 years.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck, The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2002
There are no sure things on Broadway, but when Hairspray opens in New York tonight, 1960s Baltimore could join the ranks of singing cats, an opera-obsessed phantom, African lion cubs and even a pair of crooked producers who mount a musical comedy about Hitler. Although the reviews won't be out until tomorrow, Hairspray - the musical adaptation of John Waters' 1988 movie - has already been dubbed "hot" in national publications ranging from Entertainment Weekly to Time magazine, and comparisons are being made to that megawatt hit, The Producers.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson, Special to The Baltimore Sun | August 11, 2011
Annapolis Summer Garden caps a strong season with "Hairspray," John Waters' nostalgic tribute to 1960s Baltimore that is a perfect fit for outdoor August evenings at City Dock. Based on Waters' 1988 film, the musical has won eight Tony awards, including Best Musical and Best Original Score. At a 2003 Broadway visit to a session of the American Theatre Critics Association mini-conference, Waters stressed the importance of the authenticity of every aspect of the Baltimore rowhouse set seen in the Broadway production.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | April 3, 2014
Abraham "Al" Baitch, a musician recalled as one of Baltimore's finest saxophone players, died March 24 at Northwest Hospital after suffering a fall. The Pikesville resident was 89. During his 70 years in the local entertainment scene, Mr. Baitch was a fixture at nightclubs, where his onstage antics earned him the nickname "Madman. " He headed the house band for WJZ-TV's "The Buddy Deane Show" in the 1950s and 1960s. "We played everywhere, from The Block to the French Embassy in Washington," said John Baxter, a piano player who worked alongside Mr. Baitch for 42 years.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | June 22, 1997
The castoffs left behind by WITH-AM's imminent changeover from oldies to Christian programming are beginning to find homes, thanks to the folks at WWLG-AM (1360).Beginning Saturday, the station will be making a change of its own, abandoning much of its weekend sports programming in favor of music. Included among their Saturday voices will be that grand old Baltimore tradition, Buddy Deane."Your Station of the Stars Hit Parade With Buddy Deane and Alan Field" will air Saturdays from 2 p.m. to 5 p.m., preceded by "The Ken Jackson Show" from 1 p.m. to 2 p.m. and followed by "Moonlight in Maryland With Wayne Gruen" from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. and "Big Band Jump With Don Kennedy" from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m.For those who grew up in Baltimore during the '50s and early '60s, Buddy Deane needs no introduction.
NEWS
July 17, 2013
For those of us who grew up in Baltimore in the 1950s and '60s, news of the passing of Larry Lewman, aka "Pete the Pirate," brought back fond memories of other locally produced TV shows such as "Romper Room," "The Collegian," "Dialing for Dollars" and "The Buddy Deane Show. " At a time when there were only three television channels to choose from, these shows were immensely popular and much beloved. They are a reminder of a more innocent age when life seemed simpler. Marc Raim, Baltimore
BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | June 27, 2013
The storied Milford Mill Swim Club in Baltimore County sold at auction Thursday for $775,000 to a religious group, said Dan Billig, managing member of A. J. Billig & Co. Auctioneers. He declined to disclose the name of the buyer. Other bidders included two or three developers and another nonprofit, with bidding starting at $500,000, Billig said. The 19-acre property, which includes indoor and outdoor pools plus a spring-fed quarry lake, had been used a location for "The Buddy Deane Show" and movies by directors John Waters and Barry Levinson.
NEWS
By Tyeesha Dixon and Tyeesha Dixon,Sun reporter | June 23, 2008
For three years, John Sankonis and Concetta Comi danced together on camera as teen "committee" members on The Buddy Deane Show. They didn't realize then that years later, they would marry and settle in Cockeysville - and then decades after that, do the same dance moves together in the streets of Baltimore. About 100 people attended the "Oldies Block Party and Buddy Deane Reunion," hosted by Monumental Life Insurance Co. For the event, Biddle Street was blocked off at Chase Street to allow the reunioners - and former local teen celebrities - to do the Madison, the jitterbug and multiplication dance in the street to the sounds of the Temptations, the Clovers and Little Eva. The Buddy Deane Show, which aired during the late 1950s and early 1960s, featured Baltimore teen dancers and musical celebrities.
NEWS
By TIM SWIFT | November 18, 2007
LIVE FREE OR DIE HARD Two-Disc Special Edition HAIRSPRAY Two-Disc Shake & Shimmy Edition New Line Cinema / $22.99 This Hairspray may have more in common with High School Musical than its '80s predecessor, and that's not necessarily a bad thing. Yes, this story about a plump TV dancer who fights for integration in 1960s Baltimore has been sanitized of most of its John Waters quirkiness. But as a musical, it works. Bursting into song on film is always tricky business, so the producers have wisely toned down the grit and realism, and given viewers a more polished and bright Baltimore.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck, The Baltimore Sun | August 15, 2002
There are no sure things on Broadway, but when Hairspray opens in New York tonight, 1960s Baltimore could join the ranks of singing cats, an opera-obsessed phantom, African lion cubs and even a pair of crooked producers who mount a musical comedy about Hitler. Although the reviews won't be out until tomorrow, Hairspray - the musical adaptation of John Waters' 1988 movie - has already been dubbed "hot" in national publications ranging from Entertainment Weekly to Time magazine, and comparisons are being made to that megawatt hit, The Producers.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | June 22, 1997
The castoffs left behind by WITH-AM's imminent changeover from oldies to Christian programming are beginning to find homes, thanks to the folks at WWLG-AM (1360).Beginning Saturday, the station will be making a change of its own, abandoning much of its weekend sports programming in favor of music. Included among their Saturday voices will be that grand old Baltimore tradition, Buddy Deane."Your Station of the Stars Hit Parade With Buddy Deane and Alan Field" will air Saturdays from 2 p.m. to 5 p.m., preceded by "The Ken Jackson Show" from 1 p.m. to 2 p.m. and followed by "Moonlight in Maryland With Wayne Gruen" from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. and "Big Band Jump With Don Kennedy" from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m.For those who grew up in Baltimore during the '50s and early '60s, Buddy Deane needs no introduction.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | July 20, 2007
No other teen film heroine has enjoyed herself as much as Tracy Turnblad (Nikki Blonsky) in Hair- spray. She's always singing about her elation and her delight in feeling that elation. She belts out all her love: for her hometown in "Good Morning, Baltimore," for Zac Efron's sympathetic, ready-for-action Link Larkin in "I Can Hear the Bells" and for an optimistic and open-for-anything age of music and dancing in "You Can't Stop the Beat." Tracy may live in an East Baltimore rowhouse, but her songs expose a gaudy-yet-wholesome, split-level pop psyche that helps the filmmakers maintain the verve of John Waters' 1988 comedy and provides this adaptation of the 2002 Broadway musical version with an effervescence all its own. In the scintillating Marc Shaiman-Scott Wittman score, Tracy is as self-aware as she is gung-ho about romance, idealism and rock 'n' roll.
NEWS
August 31, 2004
Sharon Lee Layfield, a former decorator and cafeteria worker, died of cancer Wednesday at her Perry Hall home. She was 55. Born and raised Sharon Lee Brown in Hampden, she was a 1966 graduate of Mergenthaler Vocational-Technical High School, where she studied cosmetology. She also appeared on the Buddy Deane Show in the early 1960s, and remained a fan of 1950s and 1960s rock 'n' roll music, family members said. Mrs. Layfield worked as a cosmetologist from 1966 to 1969, when she joined her family's business, Hampden Wallpaper and Paint Co., as a decorator.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.