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NEWS
September 16, 2003
A memorial service for former Baltimore radio and teen dance show host Winston Joe "Buddy" Deane will be held at 3 p.m. Saturday at Grace United Methodist Church, 5407 N. Charles St. Mr. Deane, 78, died July 16 of stroke complications in his native Arkansas. His Baltimore television show, which aired on WJZ-TV from 1957 to 1964, was an inspiration for the John Waters movie and hit Broadway musical Hairspray.
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NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | April 3, 2014
Abraham "Al" Baitch, a musician recalled as one of Baltimore's finest saxophone players, died March 24 at Northwest Hospital after suffering a fall. The Pikesville resident was 89. During his 70 years in the local entertainment scene, Mr. Baitch was a fixture at nightclubs, where his onstage antics earned him the nickname "Madman. " He headed the house band for WJZ-TV's "The Buddy Deane Show" in the 1950s and 1960s. "We played everywhere, from The Block to the French Embassy in Washington," said John Baxter, a piano player who worked alongside Mr. Baitch for 42 years.
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NEWS
By Tyeesha Dixon and Tyeesha Dixon,Sun reporter | June 23, 2008
For three years, John Sankonis and Concetta Comi danced together on camera as teen "committee" members on The Buddy Deane Show. They didn't realize then that years later, they would marry and settle in Cockeysville - and then decades after that, do the same dance moves together in the streets of Baltimore. About 100 people attended the "Oldies Block Party and Buddy Deane Reunion," hosted by Monumental Life Insurance Co. For the event, Biddle Street was blocked off at Chase Street to allow the reunioners - and former local teen celebrities - to do the Madison, the jitterbug and multiplication dance in the street to the sounds of the Temptations, the Clovers and Little Eva. The Buddy Deane Show, which aired during the late 1950s and early 1960s, featured Baltimore teen dancers and musical celebrities.
NEWS
By Tyeesha Dixon and Tyeesha Dixon,Sun reporter | June 23, 2008
For three years, John Sankonis and Concetta Comi danced together on camera as teen "committee" members on The Buddy Deane Show. They didn't realize then that years later, they would marry and settle in Cockeysville - and then decades after that, do the same dance moves together in the streets of Baltimore. About 100 people attended the "Oldies Block Party and Buddy Deane Reunion," hosted by Monumental Life Insurance Co. For the event, Biddle Street was blocked off at Chase Street to allow the reunioners - and former local teen celebrities - to do the Madison, the jitterbug and multiplication dance in the street to the sounds of the Temptations, the Clovers and Little Eva. The Buddy Deane Show, which aired during the late 1950s and early 1960s, featured Baltimore teen dancers and musical celebrities.
NEWS
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,SUN STAFF | April 14, 1997
To a generation of Baltimore teen-agers, Buddy Deane was a pioneering rock 'n' roll disc jockey, host of a must-see television dance party in the '50s and '60s, and an undisputed arbiter of cool.Now at 72, he's a grandfather of four, great-grandfather of three and owner of six Arkansas radio stations. But for 220 of his now middle-aged fans who turned out over the weekend at the Timonium Holiday Inn Select for one of Deane's classic record hops, he hasn't changed much."Ladies and gentlemen, here's the man on the scene with the record machine " And with that familiar introduction, Deane was home again.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,sun reporter | March 15, 2007
Arlene Kozak, who had been a key production assistant to television dance show host Buddy Deane and later helped operate a travel agency, died Tuesday of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. The Idlewylde resident was 72. Born Arlene Sarah DiDonato in Baltimore and raised in Highlandtown, she attended St. James the Less Parochial School and was a 1953 graduate of Seton High School. She went into the music business and worked at General Vending Sales, where she bought and recommended records for play on jukeboxes.
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,SUN ARTS WRITER | September 19, 2003
If Hairspray the musical is a success, it is because every single person in the audience, even the beauty queens, can remember a moment when they have felt like its heroine, Tracy Turnblad: Fat. Loud. Fatally frowsy. At a cast party held Wednesday after the opening night performance, members of the production took a moment to ponder how the musical reflects their own lives. The party itself remained true to its Charm City roots and the musical's spirit. Technically, it was by invitation only.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Frederick N. Rasmussen and Jacques Kelly and Frederick N. Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | July 17, 2003
Buddy Deane, a Pied Piper to a generation of Baltimore teen-agers with his rock 'n' roll television dance show that became an inspiration for the hit Broadway musical Hairspray, died yesterday of complications from a stroke at Jefferson Regional Medical Center in Pine Bluff, Ark. He was 78. A small-town kid from Arkansas, Winston Joe Deane came to Baltimore in 1951 after stints at radio stations in Little Rock and Memphis, Tenn. Hired by WITH radio station owner Robert C. "Jake" Embry, he was the host of a morning show that featured songs by Eddie Fisher, Frankie Laine, Teresa Brewer and other favorites of the day. To supplement his income, Mr. Deane spun records at teen dances around town, work that proved beneficial financially and professionally - he quickly learned what songs young people really wanted to hear.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | March 10, 1996
The internet web site for WJHU-FM (88.1) was listed incorrectly in Sunday's Arts section. The correct wed site is http: //www.wjhu.org.The Sun regrets the error.In 55 years on the airwaves, radio station WITH-AM (1230) has tried any number of formats: news, talk, big-band, adult contemporary, elevator music, '50s rock.They're all on display this month, as the venerable Baltimore station celebrates reaching the speed limit by bringing back to the local airwaves many of its more famous alumni and reviewing its continually changing role.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | May 12, 1996
The past is back at WITH-AM (1230). And we're not just talking about the music, either.Buddy Deane and Jack Gale, two prominent names from Baltimore's radio past, are back on the airwaves, thanks to the wonders of satellite technology and WITH's desire to tap into the memories of local baby boomers yearning to return to those rock and roll days of yesteryear.Few names stand out from Baltimore radio like Buddy Deane's. In 1951-'57 and again in 1963-'64, he was host of WITH's morning show. Between those stints, he was ringleader of the mythical (at least locally)
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,sun reporter | March 15, 2007
Arlene Kozak, who had been a key production assistant to television dance show host Buddy Deane and later helped operate a travel agency, died Tuesday of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. The Idlewylde resident was 72. Born Arlene Sarah DiDonato in Baltimore and raised in Highlandtown, she attended St. James the Less Parochial School and was a 1953 graduate of Seton High School. She went into the music business and worked at General Vending Sales, where she bought and recommended records for play on jukeboxes.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER | May 2, 2005
ON THE telephone from California, from the great carnival heart of the Michael Jackson trial, is Rigg Kennedy, who is suddenly loving life. Kennedy hasn't gotten this much attention since he danced on Baltimore's old Buddy Deane TV show and got fan letters all the way from Highlandtown. Now he's playing Jackson's lawyer on TV, and getting plaudits from the whole wide world. How do you like that? Forty years after he left his old Hampden neighborhood and headed for Hollywood, he's an overnight hit. Finally.
NEWS
By Matt Whittaker and Matt Whittaker,SUN STAFF | September 21, 2003
The writer-director of the movie Hairspray and dozens of former Buddy Deane Committee dancers attended a memorial service yesterday afternoon for Winston Joe "Buddy" Deane, whose rock 'n' roll television dance program inspired the musical and marked an era for a generation of Baltimore teen-agers. John Waters, whose 1988 film inspired this year's Tony Award-winning Broadway musical, was one of the friends, relatives and former co-workers who eulogized the city legend yesterday at Grace United Methodist Church.
NEWS
By MICHAEL OLESKER and MICHAEL OLESKER,SUN STAFF | September 19, 2003
FORTY YEARS after its famous heart attack over black and white teen-agers dancing together on the Buddy Deane television program, Baltimore gets a healing sense of humor about race, and wonders if life really can imitate art if it rearranges a few facts and lets you dance to them. In the orchestrated pandemonium on stage at the Mechanic Theatre on Wednesday night, the cues were lovely. There stood Mayor Martin O'Malley and former municipal bad-boy John Waters, with the cast of Hairspray scattered happily about and a cheering, howling (and unself-consciously integrated)
FEATURES
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,SUN ARTS WRITER | September 19, 2003
If Hairspray the musical is a success, it is because every single person in the audience, even the beauty queens, can remember a moment when they have felt like its heroine, Tracy Turnblad: Fat. Loud. Fatally frowsy. At a cast party held Wednesday after the opening night performance, members of the production took a moment to ponder how the musical reflects their own lives. The party itself remained true to its Charm City roots and the musical's spirit. Technically, it was by invitation only.
FEATURES
By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,SUN STAFF | September 18, 2003
The late Buddy Deane, godfather of Baltimore's television teendom, would have loved it: A group of his "kids," those achingly popular high schoolers who danced the cha-cha and Mashed Potato to fame 45 years ago, savoring the Broadway musical inspired by his television dance show. At least 10 "Deaners" - regulars on the Buddy Deane Show, a live dance program that captivated filmmaker John Waters and helped define the late '50s, early '60s in Baltimore - were at the Mechanic last night to welcome the award-winning Broadway show to its rightful home.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN STAFF | June 22, 1997
The castoffs left behind by WITH-AM's imminent changeover from oldies to Christian programming are beginning to find homes, thanks to the folks at WWLG-AM (1360).Beginning Saturday, the station will be making a change of its own, abandoning much of its weekend sports programming in favor of music. Included among their Saturday voices will be that grand old Baltimore tradition, Buddy Deane."Your Station of the Stars Hit Parade With Buddy Deane and Alan Field" will air Saturdays from 2 p.m. to 5 p.m., preceded by "The Ken Jackson Show" from 1 p.m. to 2 p.m. and followed by "Moonlight in Maryland With Wayne Gruen" from 5 p.m. to 7 p.m. and "Big Band Jump With Don Kennedy" from 7 p.m. to 9 p.m.For those who grew up in Baltimore during the '50s and early '60s, Buddy Deane needs no introduction.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,Sun Staff | July 20, 2003
"When you dance be sure to hold her, hold her tight. When you dance you'll squeeze her, yes, with all your might. Such a thrill, oh, when she's close to you. Well, hold her tight when you dance." -- "When You Dance," The Turbans Could life be any dreamier? There I was under the burning lights of the WJZ-TV studio, slow-dancing with a Buddy Deane Show committee member. She smelled like a garden of flowers and could crack her chewing gum discreetly. It was 1961 and I was on television, successfully building my teen-aged reputation.
NEWS
September 16, 2003
A memorial service for former Baltimore radio and teen dance show host Winston Joe "Buddy" Deane will be held at 3 p.m. Saturday at Grace United Methodist Church, 5407 N. Charles St. Mr. Deane, 78, died July 16 of stroke complications in his native Arkansas. His Baltimore television show, which aired on WJZ-TV from 1957 to 1964, was an inspiration for the John Waters movie and hit Broadway musical Hairspray.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | August 28, 2003
Lawyers and musical comedy might not seem to have much in common, but the University of Maryland School of Law is linking the two in a program that uses the Tony Award-winning musical Hairspray as a springboard to examine race relations in 1960s Baltimore. Titled Hairspray in Context: Race, Rock 'n' Roll and Baltimore, the program is envisioned as the first step in a broader, evolving relationship between the law school and especially the Mechanic and the Hippodrome theaters. (Hairspray launches its national tour at the Mechanic Sept.
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