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By Merle Rubin and Merle Rubin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | September 7, 1997
"some of the dharma," by Jack Kerouac. Viking. 416 pages. $29.95.One of the most trenchant commentaries on the phenomenothat was Jack Kerouac was contained in an episode of "The Rockford Files." The long-suffering private investigator meets up with Jack Skowran, the seedy, once-celebrated author of a best-seller called "Free Fall to Ecstasy" that neither Rockford -- nor anyone else he interviews in the course of his investigation -- was Never able to get through.If Jack Kerouac hadn't really existed, he would probably have been invented by whoever or whatever it is that manufactures cultural icons.
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NEWS
By Sam Fleischacker | October 13, 2011
A pastor supporting Rick Perry calls Mormonism a "cult. " Is that untrue? Well, what's the difference between a "cult" and a "religion"? Not easy to say. Many people think they know the difference when they see it. Scientology and the Rev. Sun Myung Moon's Unification Church are cults - aren't they? And Judaism and Christianity are surely religions. But in fact, early Christianity was considered just a cult by both Jews and Romans; Islam was long considered just a cult by medieval Christians; and, of course, many Protestant groups, from the Baptists to the Quakers, were considered cults by other Christians.
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NEWS
By Teresa Watanabe and Teresa Watanabe,Los Angeles Times | May 22, 1993
KYOTO, Japan -- In this ancient capital and cradle of Japan's religious heritage, the Buddhist priest faithfully chants his sutras. He honors the spirits of ancestors and presides over funerals. He maintains the temple grounds and attends to his flock's spiritual needs, just as every priest did before him in the Daiouji Temple's 300-year history.But Yasuo Sakakibara has a confession to make."I'm much more comfortable talking about economics than Buddhism," he says.In fact, to combat Japan's spiraling cost of living, the priest spends more of his time teaching economics at Doshisha University to make ends meet.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | December 16, 2010
It says a lot that rehearsals for Single Carrot Theatre 's latest production began back in August. "The Other Shore," by Gao Xingjian, winner of the 2000 Nobel Prize for Literature, presents formidable challenges. This is deep avant-garde territory, unconcerned with such niceties as plot or character, and it asks a lot of performers, who must find a way to connect with an audience while exploring complex issues of philosophy. Even at what seems to be its simplest, as when the actors play lighthearted games with rope, the play is burrowing into the questions of what makes us human, how humans make a society, how society can make humans conform or rebel.
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | February 15, 2003
The glowing Buddhist shrine with its scroll of Chinese calligraphy illuminates the room where Tamm E. Hunt talks of jazz. "I'm a Buddhist and a Mahayana Buddhist," she says. That's the Buddhism of the Greater Wheel, one of the mainstreams of Buddhist thought. She chants daily before the shrine. "We're about self-improvement and self development," she says. "There are millions of us." Singer Tina Turner and jazz musicians Herbie Hancock, the pianist, and Wayne Shorter, the tenor saxophone player, all practice Buddhism.
NEWS
By Jean Leslie and Jean Leslie,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 5, 2002
"In 1995, I was 41 years old and I thought I was living the way I wanted - no children, never married. I wondered, `Why wasn't I happy?' "Then a young, very sincere, dedicated teacher of Buddhism came to Hampden in Baltimore City. It was quite amazing, and I was very inspired. What inspired me was his integrity, the way that he had actualized Buddhist teaching into his own behavior. I fell in love with Buddhist teachings. "I had been raised a Catholic and attended parochial school. Although we didn't go to church every Sunday, we held certain values.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sandra Crockett and Sandra Crockett,Sun Staff | November 4, 1999
As many as 1.5 million non-Asian Americans practice some form of Buddhism today, thanks in part to celebrity adherents and popular films such as "Kundun" and "Seven Years in Tibet."There will be an opportunity to learn more about the Tibetan form of Buddhism this weekend during the Sacred Arts of Tibet Celebration at Towson University.The celebration, presented by the university's Asian Arts and Culture Center, includes an art exhibit, a lecture and a Tibetan music and dance performance."I wanted to do this because of my respect for the culture," says Suewhei Shieh, the director of the Asian Arts and Culture Center.
NEWS
By Terence Neilan and Terence Neilan,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 22, 2001
LIVINGSTON MANOR, N.Y. - Until six years ago, James Frechter rose at 9 each morning, put on a dark suit and the mandatory tie and took the subway to Wall Street to begin another long day as an associate lawyer with Stroock & Stroock & Lavan. Nowadays, he is up by 4 a.m. in the Dai Bosatsu Zendo, an hour before a young monk wakes the rest of the monastery by walking through the corridors clanging a hand bell. Frechter, now a monk who answers to the name Kigen, has by that time already donned a kimono and a thin set of robes and headed to a hall in the predawn darkness to lead fellow monks and visitors in zazen, or sitting meditation.
NEWS
By Joshua Kurlantzick and Joshua Kurlantzick,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 5, 2000
BANGKOK, Thailand - Fearing that Buddhism is losing relevance as Thailand develops economically, maverick Thai monks and laymen have launched the religion into cyberspace, transforming Buddhist teachings and stirring controversy about whether the Internet is a suitable spiritual medium. In the past three years, the number of Buddhist Web sites in Thailand has more than quadrupled, Web masters say, and hits on the most popular sites have increased at a steady pace. Several Bangkok booksellers offering religious volumes report that sales have fallen drastically since 1997.
NEWS
By Alisa Samuels and Alisa Samuels,SUN STAFF | March 3, 1996
In his search for meaning in life, Woodstock violin-maker Michael Kosman turned to the ancient religion and moral philosophy of Buddhism."It gave me the tools to find those answers in myself," says Mr. Kosman, who was raised in a liberal Jewish family and became a Buddhist in 1974. "At that time in my life I was struggling to understand what's up and what's down what's right and what's wrong."It is a path that a number of Howard County converts have followed, joining immigrants from Myanmar (formerly Burma)
NEWS
July 12, 2008
JANWILLEM VAN DE WETERING, 77 Detective series author Janwillem van de Wetering, a Dutch-born author who penned a popular detective series set in his home country, died July 4 of complications from cancer in Surry, Maine. Born in Rotterdam, Netherlands, Mr. Van de Wetering moved to Maine in 1975 and enjoyed Zen Buddhism, motorcycles and jazz. He lived in a number of countries, including Japan, where he joined a Zen monastery, which he wrote about in The Empty Mirror: Experiences in a Japanese Zen Monastery.
NEWS
By MATTHEW HAY BROWN and MATTHEW HAY BROWN,SUN REPORTER | October 30, 2005
Huston Smith has devoted a lifetime to exploring how the peoples of the world worship - and sharing his findings with the rest of us. His Religions of Man, a clear-headed exposition not only of Judaism, Christianity and Islam but also Taoism, Confucianism, Hinduism and Buddhism, has been a staple of college curricula since it was published in 1958. Subsequently revised as The World's Religions, with a chapter added on the faith systems of indigenous peoples, it has sold more than 2 million copies, launching countless readers on wide-ranging faith journeys.
NEWS
February 21, 2003
Baha'is of Howard to sponsor forum on peace Sunday The Spiritual Assembly of the Baha'is of Howard County will sponsor a public peace talk forum from 3:30 p.m. to 5:30 p.m. Sunday in the meeting room of the Elkridge library branch, 6540 Washington Blvd., Elkridge. The discussion of peaceful and sustainable means to resolve conflicts will be nonpartisan and is open to people of all faiths. Information: Barbara Mobarak, 410-799-9323. Informal Buddhism classes scheduled in Owen Brown Buddhist nun Kelsang Osel of the Vikatadamshtri Buddhist Center of Baltimore will offer informal classes in Mahayana Buddhism from 7:30 p.m. to 9 p.m. Tuesdays at Owen Brown Interfaith Center, 7246 Cradlerock Way, Columbia.
FEATURES
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,SUN STAFF | February 15, 2003
The glowing Buddhist shrine with its scroll of Chinese calligraphy illuminates the room where Tamm E. Hunt talks of jazz. "I'm a Buddhist and a Mahayana Buddhist," she says. That's the Buddhism of the Greater Wheel, one of the mainstreams of Buddhist thought. She chants daily before the shrine. "We're about self-improvement and self development," she says. "There are millions of us." Singer Tina Turner and jazz musicians Herbie Hancock, the pianist, and Wayne Shorter, the tenor saxophone player, all practice Buddhism.
NEWS
By Tricia Bishop and Tricia Bishop,SUN STAFF | August 13, 2002
Steven Albert Pope, a former Buddhist monk who planned to take up acupuncture when he retired as a computer engineer, died Aug. 6 of melanoma at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. He was 60. Mr. Pope last worked as a network engineer at Zurich U.S., a national insurance company with an office in Baltimore. He left the company in March to spend time with his family and friends after learning his cancer, which he thought was under control, had spread. Before that, he worked with computers in several area organizations and as a pipe fitter in a Wisconsin shipyard.
NEWS
By Jean Leslie and Jean Leslie,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 5, 2002
"In 1995, I was 41 years old and I thought I was living the way I wanted - no children, never married. I wondered, `Why wasn't I happy?' "Then a young, very sincere, dedicated teacher of Buddhism came to Hampden in Baltimore City. It was quite amazing, and I was very inspired. What inspired me was his integrity, the way that he had actualized Buddhist teaching into his own behavior. I fell in love with Buddhist teachings. "I had been raised a Catholic and attended parochial school. Although we didn't go to church every Sunday, we held certain values.
NEWS
By Thomas Easton and Thomas Easton,Tokyo Bureau of The Sun | March 17, 1995
FUNABASHI, JAPAN -- For nearly 50 years, ever since Emperor Hirohito renounced his divinity, the closest thing this country has had to a national religion has been work. For legions of managers, long hours in the workplace have been the best demonstration of faith.But now a small, albeit growing number of white-collar workers is seeking to become Buddhist monks.They come to a notably quiet institution in this Tokyo suburb. Their work at the Tokyo International Buddhism School revolves around chanting, the study of Buddhist ceremonies and reflections on nothingness -- how nothing is absolute and how nothing lasts.
NEWS
July 12, 2008
JANWILLEM VAN DE WETERING, 77 Detective series author Janwillem van de Wetering, a Dutch-born author who penned a popular detective series set in his home country, died July 4 of complications from cancer in Surry, Maine. Born in Rotterdam, Netherlands, Mr. Van de Wetering moved to Maine in 1975 and enjoyed Zen Buddhism, motorcycles and jazz. He lived in a number of countries, including Japan, where he joined a Zen monastery, which he wrote about in The Empty Mirror: Experiences in a Japanese Zen Monastery.
NEWS
By Barbara Crosette and Barbara Crosette,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | February 24, 2002
NEW YORK - In the war against terrorism, the Buddhists of New York are suffering collateral damage. Messages of peace and compassion that once seemed attractive to New Yorkers are now anathema, Buddhists are discovering. Six months ago, Buddhism - Tibetan and Zen - was on a phenomenal upsurge in the New York area, attracting eager students to rural monasteries and urban meditation centers. Then came the attacks on the United States and the U.S. war in Afghanistan. Nonviolence is no longer in fashion, particularly in New York, where the scars go deep and wounds are still fresh months after the destruction of the World Trade Center.
FEATURES
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,SUN ART CRITIC | October 20, 2001
The Western eye can easily become lost in the vast panorama of Indian art. We don't recognize the signposts, as it were, of the Buddhist and Hindu inner world views. In the art of the West, these signposts are familiar from daily experience, from books and pictures, and from our knowledge of history, especially the history of Western art. But in the Buddhist and Hindu art of South Asia there is no such easy familiarity. We have to learn anew all the personages represented in this art, their attributes and powers and the stories they embody.
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