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By Dorothy Fleetwood and Dorothy Fleetwood,Contributing Writer | May 7, 1995
Bucks County, Pa., has long been a haven for painters, sculptors, writers, actors and others in creative fields. "Bucks Fever '95," scheduled through July 4, celebrates the county's artistic heritage with original drama, new music, dance, concerts, sculpture, garden tours, architectural tours and many other activities.One event that draws national attention is the 22nd annual Mercer Folk Fest Saturday and May 14 on the grounds of the Mercer Museum in Doylestown, Pa. The festival features more than 100 artisans.
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NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | July 12, 2013
A fugitive wanted for murder in Pennsylvania was wrongly released from the Baltimore City Detention Center this week - and authorities are still trying to figure out how that happened. Dale Wakefield, 21, is being held in a Bucks County, Pa., jail after being recaptured on the campus of Coppin State University. The county's district attorney pinned the blame for Wakefield's errant release on city jail administrators, calling them “inept and completely uncooperative” and saying simple database checks would show he was wanted for murdering a homeless veteran.
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NEWS
By Zlati Meyer and Zlati Meyer,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | December 3, 2000
WEST ROCKHILL, Pa. - Thousands of miles from Alaska, in Bucks County, Pa., where the landscape is blanketed with colorful leaves, not several feet of snow, Rob Downey trains some of his 50 sled dogs. A champion sledder and president of the 1,000-member U.S. Sled Dog Sports Federation, the sport's governing body, he is as dedicated to the sport as are the four-legged teammates that pull at the leashes that keep them from dashing around his 13 acres. Though Downey, 46, lives in Bucks County, not the outskirts of Anchorage, he works hard to train his Alaskan huskies without snow, using, instead, sand and Rube Goldberg-esque exercise equipment.
ENTERTAINMENT
By JESSICA BERTHOLD | May 4, 2006
The photoblog A Walk Through Durham Township, Pennsylvania (durhamtownship.com) is a visual valentine to scenic southeastern Pennsylvania. An ever-expanding collection of landscape and slice-of-life photos, the blog lovingly documents rural life, from farmers framed by freshly plowed fields to rolling hills dotted with silos. Many of the shots are simple collages of clouds, earth, sky and an object (a tree, a tractor, a person) whose solitude renders it remarkable. The composition and coloring of the images are quietly, and consistently, stunning in their artistry.
TRAVEL
By Susan Reimer and Susan Reimer,Sun Staff | January 10, 1999
A weekend at a bed and breakfast is the common denominator daydream of all kinds of couples, from new lovers to weary parents or touristy retirees. It is an intimate retreat, a place of discovery or rediscovery, a jumping-off point for sightseeing.The same is true even if you're not a couple at all, but three women: forever friends from way-back-when who play an unspoken game of "Can You Top This?" when selecting the setting for a reunion.In that case, a bed and breakfast must be more than "delightful" or "charming."
TRAVEL
By Robin Tunnicliff Reid and By Robin Tunnicliff Reid,Special to the Sun | May 13, 2001
Of the many brilliant minds who settled in Bucks County, Pa., playwright George S. Kaufman was the one who came under a cloud. The lanky, bespectacled co-author of "You Can't Take It With You" and "The Man Who Came to Dinner" was making headlines in 1936, but not because of his work. Actress Mary Astor had documented her affair with Kaufman (among others) in her diary, and the lurid excerpts that wound up in the newspaper during her acrimonious divorce rivaled anything on stage or screen.
FEATURES
By Bruce Friedland and Bruce Friedland,Sun Staff | April 26, 1998
Is there any better relief from the demands of adulthood than a weekend getaway?Consider adulthood: You're battling traffic day and night, and never-ending deadlines at work. At home, the house is falling down around you, and the kids want to know for the 500th time why they can't get a horse.Consider a weekend getaway: All cares, responsibilities and children are left behind, money is thrown around as if you had it to spare and friendly people are at your beck and call - pouring that second glass of fresh-squeezed orange juice at breakfast, directing you to the best sights in town, preparing the fireplace in your bedroom at night so the flames will spring to life with a single match strike.
ENTERTAINMENT
By JESSICA BERTHOLD | May 4, 2006
The photoblog A Walk Through Durham Township, Pennsylvania (durhamtownship.com) is a visual valentine to scenic southeastern Pennsylvania. An ever-expanding collection of landscape and slice-of-life photos, the blog lovingly documents rural life, from farmers framed by freshly plowed fields to rolling hills dotted with silos. Many of the shots are simple collages of clouds, earth, sky and an object (a tree, a tractor, a person) whose solitude renders it remarkable. The composition and coloring of the images are quietly, and consistently, stunning in their artistry.
FEATURES
By Knight-Ridder News Service | September 29, 1992
Songwriter Carole King made a rare singing appearance last weekend at the Bucks County (Pa.) Playhouse to boost the candidacy of Rep. Peter H. Kostmayer, D-Pa. Among the ditties the composer rendered before 325 listeners were her "I Feel the Earth Move," "Natural Woman" and "So Far Away." Ms. King said she supported the incumbent for his environmental record and because "his views and values coincide with what I believe to be the right thing."
NEWS
By Matthew P. Blanchard and Matthew P. Blanchard,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | March 18, 2001
PHILADELPHIA - Federal agents have started an effort to combat what they say is a regional environmental crisis: Hundreds of thousands of Canada geese excreting waste into area drinking-water reservoirs. Rumors about the device, also known as the "laser goose-dissuader," had been flying for weeks among bird-watchers near Lake Galena in central Bucks County. It sweeps the geese off a lake like a broom, they said. The harmless laser is perhaps the weirdest tool in the arsenal available to East Coast communities coping with an exploding Canada goose population crowding lakes, soccer fields and corporate lawns.
NEWS
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 23, 2003
The 11-room mansion known as Blandair was already more than 130 years old when Howard County was incorporated on July 4, 1851. The stately brick home, built in 1714, was named for one-time owner Theodorick Bland, who served as U.S. consul to Brazil in the early 1800s. It was also home to John C. Weems, an 18th-cen- tury congressman. But by the time the planned community of Columbia grew up around it in the 1960s, it was inhabited only by Elizabeth C. Smith, known as Nancy, an unmarried woman who lived there most of her 82 years.
NEWS
By Peter Sigal and Peter Sigal,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | August 4, 2002
PHLADELPHIA - Through revolutions political, industrial and social, the descendants of Johann Trauger have turned the same soil on the same windswept knoll. "This is the last of God's country left in Bucks County," said J. Howard Roth, looking across a valley to his white cluster of farm buildings amid a sea of tender young hay. With his two children in other lines of work, Roth, 65, is likely to be the last of the Trauger line to work the approximately 150 acres in Nockamixon. "I would have loved to see it go on for another generation," said Roth, a Trauger on his mother's side, with a touch of wistfulness.
NEWS
By Zlati Meyer and Zlati Meyer,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | July 3, 2002
BRISTOL BOROUGH, Pa. - Against a backdrop of quaint quad homes built on a once-rusting industrial site, Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Christine Todd Whitman recently announced $14.6 million in brownfield grants to help redevelop 80 such sites across the country, including one in the borough. "For every dollar of federal money invested, we leverage $2.50 in private-sector investment," she said. "For every acre of brownfield redeveloped, we save 4.5 acres of greenfield. That's the kind of investment we want."
BUSINESS
By Joe Nawrozki and Joe Nawrozki,SUN STAFF | February 8, 2002
Patti and Roger Zajdel remember that morning two summers ago on the banks of Middle River as if it were yesterday. That's when Baltimore County Executive C.A. Dutch Ruppersberger, flush with pride over the official unveiling of his waterfront destination plan, draped his arms over their shoulders and told them they could be millionaires one day. They're still waiting. "We haven't heard a word from him, or the county, since," said Patti Zajdel, co-owner with her husband of the Commodore Inn and social hall, a faded but beloved east-side watering hole that would be refurbished or torn down as part of Ruppersberger's ambitious east-side revitalization plan.
NEWS
October 27, 2001
Douglas N. Brooks, 79, businessman, consultant Douglas N. Brooks, a businessman, consultant and former chief executive officer of Neptune Eastech, which makes meters used to measure liquid flow through pipelines, died Oct. 19 of a stroke at Maryland Shock Trauma Center. He was 79 and lived in Timonium. Mr. Brooks retired in 1979 from Neptune Eastech, an instrumentation company he had acquired earlier in the decade. Earlier, he had been CEO of Brooks Instrument in Hatfield, Pa., also an instrumentation manufacturer, which he sold in 1970.
TRAVEL
By Robin Tunnicliff Reid and By Robin Tunnicliff Reid,Special to the Sun | May 13, 2001
Of the many brilliant minds who settled in Bucks County, Pa., playwright George S. Kaufman was the one who came under a cloud. The lanky, bespectacled co-author of "You Can't Take It With You" and "The Man Who Came to Dinner" was making headlines in 1936, but not because of his work. Actress Mary Astor had documented her affair with Kaufman (among others) in her diary, and the lurid excerpts that wound up in the newspaper during her acrimonious divorce rivaled anything on stage or screen.
NEWS
By Justin Fenton, The Baltimore Sun | July 12, 2013
A fugitive wanted for murder in Pennsylvania was wrongly released from the Baltimore City Detention Center this week - and authorities are still trying to figure out how that happened. Dale Wakefield, 21, is being held in a Bucks County, Pa., jail after being recaptured on the campus of Coppin State University. The county's district attorney pinned the blame for Wakefield's errant release on city jail administrators, calling them “inept and completely uncooperative” and saying simple database checks would show he was wanted for murdering a homeless veteran.
NEWS
By Bruce Reid and Bruce Reid,Staff Writer | July 26, 1992
Joe Peller found his thrill -- maybe -- at the Bucks County Blues Festival.But he forget to get her phone number. Or her last name.So Mr. Peller, 36, of the Philadelphia suburb of Langhorne, did what any ambitious, creative young man would do.He took out a three-day, prominently placed advertisement in The Sun for $125. The ad, which ran Friday and yesterday and runs today, reads:"KAREN from Baltimore, I met you at the Bucks County Blues Festival. 7/18. Please call Joe from Langhorne. . . ."
NEWS
By Matthew P. Blanchard and Matthew P. Blanchard,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | March 18, 2001
PHILADELPHIA - Federal agents have started an effort to combat what they say is a regional environmental crisis: Hundreds of thousands of Canada geese excreting waste into area drinking-water reservoirs. Rumors about the device, also known as the "laser goose-dissuader," had been flying for weeks among bird-watchers near Lake Galena in central Bucks County. It sweeps the geese off a lake like a broom, they said. The harmless laser is perhaps the weirdest tool in the arsenal available to East Coast communities coping with an exploding Canada goose population crowding lakes, soccer fields and corporate lawns.
NEWS
By Zlati Meyer and Zlati Meyer,KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | December 3, 2000
WEST ROCKHILL, Pa. - Thousands of miles from Alaska, in Bucks County, Pa., where the landscape is blanketed with colorful leaves, not several feet of snow, Rob Downey trains some of his 50 sled dogs. A champion sledder and president of the 1,000-member U.S. Sled Dog Sports Federation, the sport's governing body, he is as dedicated to the sport as are the four-legged teammates that pull at the leashes that keep them from dashing around his 13 acres. Though Downey, 46, lives in Bucks County, not the outskirts of Anchorage, he works hard to train his Alaskan huskies without snow, using, instead, sand and Rube Goldberg-esque exercise equipment.
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